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Help With Cursive?

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    Help With Cursive?

    I have a kiddo that does very well with composition and vocabulary, but still struggles with forming letters. We are working on cursive, and having more luck with NAC than we did with manuscript, but she is still struggling to remember stroke sequences. I hear Mr. Pudewa mention that having kids look at the letter and write it on a separate line works better than having them continually trace the letter. Is this true? Does anyone know where I can get some more tips? My daughter likes cursive, we just need to see more progress with remembering stroke sequence. Help? TIA!

    #2
    Do you know about these Cursive Practice Sheets? She might do well with Book One. https://www.memoriapress.com/curricu...actice-sheets/

    Our Simply Classical Copybook series gives more practice with both manuscript and cursive. We use the same method you describe, as the model is above the line where the child copies the letters or words. https://www.memoriapress.com/curricu...pybook-series/

    To lengthen each lesson, you might also try vertical writing on the board. Model the letter formation, provide space beneath your letter for her to copy.

    You might post this handy alphabet chart near her desk: https://www.memoriapress.com/curricu...t-wall-poster/

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      #3
      Thank you, Cheryl. We have all of those books except the SC copybooks. I will have to order those. Thank you for the tips!

      Comment


        #4
        There are incredible data on this. If you teach your child the motion with the arm (from the shoulder, from the elbow, from the wrist, or from the finger tips), it is all the same and translates to the page. Whenever my children and I are working on teaching handwriting for the first time, we begin with drawing the letter in the air. I do it backwards facing the student, and they follow my motion as I read out the main stroke sequences. I might draw three lines (top, middle and base line) with my hand in the air, then I will have my child memorize the names of the lines. Tell them where the letter begins. Read the instructions NAC uses for teaching the letters. Draw it together in the air. Do it together on a walk. Do it in dry white rice in a shoe box. Do it with chalk on a driveway, side walk, or concrete garage or basement floor. Call out letters and have your daughter draw the letter. Have her spell some simple words in the air if you have learned those letters. The fine motor skills will come with time, but it sounds like remember how to form the letter is the pressing issue, so start there. Use the cursive practice sheets for showing her best seat work once the letter is down from memory.
        Mama of 2, teacher of 3
        Summer: First Start French I
        SY 22/23
        6A, teaching TFL & CC Chreia/Maxim in group, and Koine Greek
        MP2 w/ R&S Arithmetic 3


        Completed MPK, MP1, MP2, 3A, 4A, 5A
        SC B, SC C, SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

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          #5
          enbateau Perfect! Thank you! Would you wait on using the book until all letters are learned? or just begin teaching a letter as stated above, and follow up that specific letter with the workbook/practice sheets?

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            #6
            I think you will like the book Cursive Practice Sheets (CPS) because it works on connections for only the letters the students have learned in NAC 1's order (with the exception of t being added by letter i, but it's so similar to manuscript t, it shouldn't be an issue). CPS usually has space for copying next to or below text if you would rather do that than trace. The space to copy is not as deliberate nor in as large a font as SC Copybook 2. Also, copying in the CPS would be from dashed lines, which are a little less clear to see if copying alone is your goal.

            While the SC Cursive Copybook Two is definitely something beautiful I would want my cursive-learning child to complete, it does not limit letters that have not been learned if you're going through NAC 1 at the same time. It will be a great option in a few more months when those letters are in the vault. You could get it now and use the reproducible letter practice pages.

            Another option if you have a compatible computer and printer is the NAC StartWrite software from MP. You could make unlimited copy pages in whatever combo of letters she has mastered. Look at the tab under Product Description to see all the sizes and iterations you can do!
            Mama of 2, teacher of 3
            Summer: First Start French I
            SY 22/23
            6A, teaching TFL & CC Chreia/Maxim in group, and Koine Greek
            MP2 w/ R&S Arithmetic 3


            Completed MPK, MP1, MP2, 3A, 4A, 5A
            SC B, SC C, SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

            Comment


              #7
              enbateau Thank you.

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