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Delaying Graduation

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    Delaying Graduation

    What are your thoughts about delaying graduation to 20 or 21? Advantages? Disadvantages? If I keep my son in the track he's on, he will graduate at 19 (already had him "red shirted"). Regardless of how he progresses, I'm sure I could graduate him at 19, but I'm not sure it would be in his best interest. There is a lot to think about, and the ISP we homeschool through basically sets grade level in stone once they start 9th grade. He will be 7th grade next school year, so we still have some time...but, as we all know, things can change in a heartbeat and I'm not thrilled with the idea of having to make that decision in just 2 years. If you extended high school, did you do any of the extending while in high school or all before starting high school?
    Cheryl, mom to:

    ds 26, graduated
    ds 25, graduated
    dd 11th Grade
    dd 8th Grade
    ds 6th Grade

    #2
    Hi Cheryl,

    I'm writing as one "in the boat with you", not a veteran. We have decided to do high-school level work with our two oldest DD together; they are happy to work their courses and graduate together. My oldest isn't quite doing high-school level work yet, even nearing 16 years of age, and she needs lots of coaching socially. My husband and I hope that with the extra time she may start a cottage business (she aspires to become an illustrator) to promote her artistic talents. The biggest hurdle right now is dealing with things like piano competitions that she participates in. Will they accept a 20-year-old "senior"? But that is small potatoes when she still needs a great deal of support with executive functioning of daily tasks and really mastering skills like arithmetic well enough for a college classroom.

    There's a current trend in our neck of the woods for many just-graduated high schoolers (not special-needs) to take a year off before beginning college. I know that she won't necessarily be the "oldest" in the class by default and believe the advantages will outweigh themselves.

    Looking forward to insights others will share!

    Laura
    Laura H.

    DD: 16, special-needs: language processing issues (modified 7/8M Core), aspiring illustrator, our "Meg"
    DD: 13 (8M with FFL Fall 2021), aspiring pediatric nurse, our "Jo"
    DD: 9 (SC4 Fall 2021) our "Beth"
    DD: 9 (SC4 Fall 2021) our "Amy"

    Comment


      #3
      I look at it as, “They finish when they finish.” Lots of adults go back and get their GED or their associate/bachelor’s/masters/PhD. It’s all arbitrary. They finish when they finish. I’m not at all aware of age differences among my “peers” who are five years younger or ten years older. As we age most of that differentiation just falls off. I think it’s odd that kids are grouped together by age and nothing else, honestly. My oldest two will probably not graduate “on time” and that’s just fine with me (although I do anticipate them to “want” to graduate at 18 — and that might be good impetus for them to move it along academically through their own initiative).

      Are they skilled and mature enough to handle the life they are “graduating” into? That’s the big question. And if that answer is “no”, then they can wait a year or two until it is “yes”.
      “If I should fall even a thousand times a day, a thousand times, with peaceful repentance, I will say immediately, Nunc Coepi, ‘Now, I begin.’.”

      ~Venerable Bruno Lanteri
      ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
      Wonder Boy 14 ... MP5 + R&S Math 6
      Joy Bubble 12 ... MP5 full core
      Cowboy 10 ... MP5 + R&S Math 4
      Sassafras 6 ... MP1
      All … SSPX Catechesis

      Comment


        #4
        We extended graduation for a variety of reasons but did so within the high school years. Your situation is a little more challenging because it sounds as if you may need to determine his ultimate graduation date before he enters 9th grade.

        If you and he decide on 19, 20, or 21, the good news is that the decision need not be all-or-nothing.

        Examples:
        During high school, he might ...
        - attempt dual enrollment with a community college. This could save $$ and allow you to assist with his community college courses.
        - qualify for a technical training program in the afternoons, if this aligns with his abilities and interests.
        - volunteer, intern, or begin working in the afternoons when he is finished with his classes.
        - access services for transitions, vocational assistance, or other funded opportunities available in your state.

        To help with all of the above, you might begin administering some interest inventories in his 8th grade year.

        Another thought:
        Even if he were not ready for any of the above, you would have the freedom to teach him beyond graduation! This is something I did not consider when I felt locked in to a transcript and graduation date. We can "graduate" our children formally, but then we can extend the education another year (or beyond) to include all of the studies he desires or needs. In other words, we can (and likely will) continue to be academically and vocationally supportive beyond the graduation party.


        You have time to decide, so you can weigh all of the options as you research and explore them over the next 1-2 years. I find all of this fascinating for our families, as we see where our children "land." We will follow and be very interested to learn what you decide!

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by MarmeeLaura View Post
          Hi Cheryl,

          I'm writing as one "in the boat with you", not a veteran. We have decided to do high-school level work with our two oldest DD together; they are happy to work their courses and graduate together. My oldest isn't quite doing high-school level work yet, even nearing 16 years of age, and she needs lots of coaching socially. My husband and I hope that with the extra time she may start a cottage business (she aspires to become an illustrator) to promote her artistic talents. The biggest hurdle right now is dealing with things like piano competitions that she participates in. Will they accept a 20-year-old "senior"? But that is small potatoes when she still needs a great deal of support with executive functioning of daily tasks and really mastering skills like arithmetic well enough for a college classroom.

          There's a current trend in our neck of the woods for many just-graduated high schoolers (not special-needs) to take a year off before beginning college. I know that she won't necessarily be the "oldest" in the class by default and believe the advantages will outweigh themselves.

          Looking forward to insights others will share!

          Laura
          MarmeeLaura Thank you, sometimes it helps just to know you aren't alone :-) You make some very good points. My son is small, so he already looks younger than he is (more like his developmental age) and likely wouldn't make anyone think twice about him age wise if he was to take classes anywhere. My 2nd son (almost 26) took a year off and goes to college part time to avoid debt, so he is still in college. He looks his age or older, and nobody has said anything to him.
          Cheryl, mom to:

          ds 26, graduated
          ds 25, graduated
          dd 11th Grade
          dd 8th Grade
          ds 6th Grade

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Anita View Post
            I look at it as, “They finish when they finish.” Lots of adults go back and get their GED or their associate/bachelor’s/masters/PhD. It’s all arbitrary. They finish when they finish. I’m not at all aware of age differences among my “peers” who are five years younger or ten years older. As we age most of that differentiation just falls off. I think it’s odd that kids are grouped together by age and nothing else, honestly. My oldest two will probably not graduate “on time” and that’s just fine with me (although I do anticipate them to “want” to graduate at 18 — and that might be good impetus for them to move it along academically through their own initiative).

            Are they skilled and mature enough to handle the life they are “graduating” into? That’s the big question. And if that answer is “no”, then they can wait a year or two until it is “yes”.
            Anita That is basically how I feel...about everything you said. Maturity (or lack thereof) is a huge factor, so we're very much leaning towards graduating at 21. I feel like it would serve him better to have the opportunity to advance more in his studies too. Thank you :-)
            Cheryl, mom to:

            ds 26, graduated
            ds 25, graduated
            dd 11th Grade
            dd 8th Grade
            ds 6th Grade

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
              We extended graduation for a variety of reasons but did so within the high school years. Your situation is a little more challenging because it sounds as if you may need to determine his ultimate graduation date before he enters 9th grade.

              If you and he decide on 19, 20, or 21, the good news is that the decision need not be all-or-nothing.

              Examples:
              During high school, he might ...
              - attempt dual enrollment with a community college. This could save $$ and allow you to assist with his community college courses.
              - qualify for a technical training program in the afternoons, if this aligns with his abilities and interests.
              - volunteer, intern, or begin working in the afternoons when he is finished with his classes.
              - access services for transitions, vocational assistance, or other funded opportunities available in your state.

              To help with all of the above, you might begin administering some interest inventories in his 8th grade year.

              Another thought:
              Even if he were not ready for any of the above, you would have the freedom to teach him beyond graduation! This is something I did not consider when I felt locked in to a transcript and graduation date. We can "graduate" our children formally, but then we can extend the education another year (or beyond) to include all of the studies he desires or needs. In other words, we can (and likely will) continue to be academically and vocationally supportive beyond the graduation party.


              You have time to decide, so you can weigh all of the options as you research and explore them over the next 1-2 years. I find all of this fascinating for our families, as we see where our children "land." We will follow and be very interested to learn what you decide!
              cherylswope Yes, having to determine his graduation date before he enters high school is really stressing me out and the reason I'm even thinking about it now. I really hope my ISP will work with me on this. I can understand them not wanting people to go back and forth between grades arbitrarily, but I think they need to make allowances for special circumstances.

              While I could teach him beyond graduation, nothing he studied after graduation would be included on his transcript. We are very much leading towards graduating him at 21. At present we are only seeing positives (more time to mature, more time to get higher level classes on his transcript, etc). We don't currently use any services and don't plan to, but I don't want to shut the door on that possibility if it will be useful in the future).

              If we add 2 additional years to his school plan, do you have any suggestion to how to do it? Should I advance him this year to 7th and then do 2 years of 7th and 2 years of 8th? Or, would it be better to have him repeat 8th twice, or maybe even to retain him in 6th and 7th (before he realizes that he isn't advancing in grade level)? I guess leaving it until after 8th grade will give us the most time to decide, but I also don't want him really realizing that he was in 8th grade for 3 years.

              Thank you for your help <3
              Cheryl, mom to:

              ds 26, graduated
              ds 25, graduated
              dd 11th Grade
              dd 8th Grade
              ds 6th Grade

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Cheryl in CA View Post

                MarmeeLaura Thank you, sometimes it helps just to know you aren't alone :-) You make some very good points. My son is small, so he already looks younger than he is (more like his developmental age) and likely wouldn't make anyone think twice about him age wise if he was to take classes anywhere. My 2nd son (almost 26) took a year off and goes to college part time to avoid debt, so he is still in college. He looks his age or older, and nobody has said anything to him.
                Cheryl in CA My husband is a community college professor and his classes (he teaches public speaking) have students from high-school age to middle-age adults with full-time jobs who are returning to school. He's helped me to re-frame the mindset about starting college later. My father is also a retired professor who always said his favorite students where the older ones because, "They took it much more seriously and did far better work."
                Laura H.

                DD: 16, special-needs: language processing issues (modified 7/8M Core), aspiring illustrator, our "Meg"
                DD: 13 (8M with FFL Fall 2021), aspiring pediatric nurse, our "Jo"
                DD: 9 (SC4 Fall 2021) our "Beth"
                DD: 9 (SC4 Fall 2021) our "Amy"

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Cheryl in CA View Post

                  cherylswope Yes, having to determine his graduation date before he enters high school is really stressing me out and the reason I'm even thinking about it now. I really hope my ISP will work with me on this. I can understand them not wanting people to go back and forth between grades arbitrarily, but I think they need to make allowances for special circumstances.

                  While I could teach him beyond graduation, nothing he studied after graduation would be included on his transcript. We are very much leading towards graduating him at 21. At present we are only seeing positives (more time to mature, more time to get higher level classes on his transcript, etc). We don't currently use any services and don't plan to, but I don't want to shut the door on that possibility if it will be useful in the future).

                  If we add 2 additional years to his school plan, do you have any suggestion to how to do it? Should I advance him this year to 7th and then do 2 years of 7th and 2 years of 8th? Or, would it be better to have him repeat 8th twice, or maybe even to retain him in 6th and 7th (before he realizes that he isn't advancing in grade level)? I guess leaving it until after 8th grade will give us the most time to decide, but I also don't want him really realizing that he was in 8th grade for 3 years.

                  Thank you for your help <3

                  I think I would consider retaining in 6th and 7th if this would benefit him. He could mature and strengthen foundations in any weaker academic areas prior to beginning high school work. This might keep his transcript as strong as possible.

                  Rather than repeat his stronger subjects, you could customize upward wherever possible to avoid holding him back in any area(s) of strength.

                  Along with the initial plans for SC 11&12, we created a chart indicating all needed MP resources for additional years of study after SC 11&12. This might be useful as a reference for your planning. I can email it to you if you would like.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by MarmeeLaura View Post

                    Cheryl in CA My husband is a community college professor and his classes (he teaches public speaking) have students from high-school age to middle-age adults with full-time jobs who are returning to school. He's helped me to re-frame the mindset about starting college later. My father is also a retired professor who always said his favorite students where the older ones because, "They took it much more seriously and did far better work."
                    Anita Thank you <3
                    Cheryl, mom to:

                    ds 26, graduated
                    ds 25, graduated
                    dd 11th Grade
                    dd 8th Grade
                    ds 6th Grade

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by cherylswope View Post


                      I think I would consider retaining in 6th and 7th if this would benefit him. He could mature and strengthen foundations in any weaker academic areas prior to beginning high school work. This might keep his transcript as strong as possible.

                      Rather than repeat his stronger subjects, you could customize upward wherever possible to avoid holding him back in any area(s) of strength.

                      Along with the initial plans for SC 11&12, we created a chart indicating all needed MP resources for additional years of study after SC 11&12. This might be useful as a reference for your planning. I can email it to you if you would like.
                      cherylswope Thank you, that is very helpful!

                      Oh yes, I move my students forward based on mastery (and appropriateness of material for non-mastery subjects), so I wouldn't be repeating anything...just giving him more time for further advancement.

                      I would LOVE the chart! My email is [email protected]

                      Thank you so much!!!
                      Cheryl, mom to:

                      ds 26, graduated
                      ds 25, graduated
                      dd 11th Grade
                      dd 8th Grade
                      ds 6th Grade

                      Comment

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