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Time & Money

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    Time & Money

    I love our math program, but it does not teach time or money. I am planning a unit for each topic. Can you suggest any books for these topics.

    #2
    Good morning!

    See The Coin Counting Book from SC 3 Arithmetic Read-Alouds, https://www.memoriapress.com/curricu...counting-book/.

    Simply Classical has a good demo clock if you need one, https://www.memoriapress.com/curricu...tration-clock/

    A few tips: Use real money to teach money. Use a real clock alongside your demo clock to teach time.


    To help with your planning, see our Simply Classical Arithmetic scope & sequence. Scroll to p. 16 for Time and Money to see what can be covered age by age.


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      #3
      Honestly, the Rod & Staff student workbooks are so cheap ($8 ea) that you could get one and it would almost be cheaper than printing off tens of copies. We have added a geared clock from Rainbow Resource and some large coin cutouts for my little guy. I keep the US coins (laminated with a magnetic sticker secured with packing tape on the back) on our magnetic whiteboard in order so that at the start of the lesson we run through our rhyme and he can reference it as he completes the activity sheet. Doing this with real money is ideal, so don't fret if you can't find the printable or magnetic kind. Oriental Trading company discontinued the set I bought (which has the older less-indentifiable nickels and quarters still in circulation).

      Here's the rhyme we use:

      A penny's worth one cent,
      a nickel's worth five,
      a dime is worth ten cents,
      a quarter's twenty-five.

      I point at each coin as we say it. I always have it in order of one with heads, one with tails. The K and MP1 recitations have good questions about how many of each coin is in a dollar, too.
      Mama of 2, teacher of 3

      SY 21/22
      5A w/ SFL & CC Narrative class
      MP1

      Completed MPK, MP1 Math & Enrichment, MP2, 3A, 4A
      SC B, SC C, SC1 (Phonics/Math), SC2's Writing Book 1

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        #4
        cherylswope enbateau Thank you!

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