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In between level 1 and level 2

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  • AnneGG
    replied
    [QUOTE=enbateau;n128831]Something that gave us a lot of traction was getting a piece of Hot Wheels track from our local dollar store. It had a short piece and a long piece. I stuck the short a (a-a-apple) flashcard above the short track horizontally placed on the floor and the long a (a-like-cake ) flashcard above the long track next to it on the floor. I took a few Hot Wheels cars and lined them up to listen for a word that I read off a flashcard, mixing short and long vowel words in random order (don't do every-other). I had him drive the car on the short track if he heard the short a sound and on the long track if he heard the long a sound. After he drove the car on the correct track, I showed him the word I said aloud and asked him why the word said the short or long sound. He had to say that the vowel was not at the end of the syllable or that it had a silent e at the end. We repeated this with all of the short vs long vowels. You could do the same thing with a Thomas the Train engine and a short track vs. long stretch of track. It is visually symbolic to have one be short (like the vowel sound--and on the left, as it's the vowel's first sound) and the other track be long.



    What a great idea! Thank you!


    Leave a comment:


  • enbateau
    replied
    Something that gave us a lot of traction was getting a piece of Hot Wheels track from our local dollar store. It had a short piece and a long piece. I stuck the short a (a-a-apple) flashcard above the short track horizontally placed on the floor and the long a (a-like-cake ) flashcard above the long track next to it on the floor. I took a few Hot Wheels cars and lined them up to listen for a word that I read off a flashcard, mixing short and long vowel words in random order (don't do every-other). I had him drive the car on the short track if he heard the short a sound and on the long track if he heard the long a sound. After he drove the car on the correct track, I showed him the word I said aloud and asked him why the word said the short or long sound. He had to say that the vowel was not at the end of the syllable or that it had a silent e at the end. We repeated this with all of the short vs long vowels. You could do the same thing with a Thomas the Train engine and a short track vs. long stretch of track. It is visually symbolic to have one be short (like the vowel sound--and on the left, as it's the vowel's first sound) and the other track be long.

    Another game we played was to write short and long vowel words on strips of paper and get out a game board (like Candy Land or Chutes and Ladders) and have him read each word, going two spaces with a pawn if he read it correctly the first time, one space if he read it correctly the second time, and drawing again if he missed it (while I read the word and explained the rule, putting it in the back of the pile). For each word he read, he had to explain WHY the vowel said the long or short sound (silent e vs. no silent e/not at the end of the syllable). I found that the analysis of each word's spelling made the biggest difference in future reading success.

    For the Book D three-sentence stories, I had my little guy underline any silent e's at the end of a word in aqua. It was just enough to help him look to the end of the word before decoding the vowel sound. We read and re-read those Book D stories.

    The final activity we added was to use a whiteboard and write a word and change it by erasing or adding a silent e. I would write "pine," have him read it, erase the e, and make sure he knew it was "pin." Toggling back and forth between seeing the word as a CVC/CVCC word with a short vowel vs. silent e word over and over helped cement the rule. You could also dictate CVC words, ask her to write a silent e at the end and read it again. Ask how the silent e changes the vowel before it. Some kids like the first sound being short, second sound a vowel makes being long, and some kids just memorize the short sounds and long sounds. My little guy appreciated the 1st/2nd distinction, even though we had been doing short and long vowel recitation since the beginning of the year.

    Above, Classical Phonics was mentioned. Word families have been so helpful to my little guy. Don't underestimate those word lists.

    If your sweet girl has any vision issues, consider retyping the word lists in MS Word. You can go into fonts and adjust the spacing between letters (it's called "expanded" in the manual font settings). More space around each letter can be a nice bridge to seeing each letter or phonogram in isolation. By the way, I don't consider sounding out each letter a bag thing. The fluency and speed will come with time. Each child has his/her own time table.

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  • sfhargett
    replied
    I think your gut feeling on pausing is right on the money. Many kids need extra time when you add long vowels. Cheryl's suggestions are great. Also, you might look online for free printable activities and games for magic e words. I think "thisreadingmama" and "themeasuredmom" have some. It's been a while since I had a child at that stage (although, I'll be there again soon hopefully).

    For math, this could be a good time to pull out blackline pages from R&S 1. I remember my daughter hitting a bit of a plateau with fact family 6 or 7. One thing I saw on the teacher training (for a higher grade, but I think it would work) was to write the family out on the board with the answers. Recite it, then erase the answers, then go through them in a random fashion. It takes a little extra time, but seems a bit more interactive than flash cards.

    Make some copybook pages with an online program or the Startwrite program. Read some good books that include a few science or social studies topics and you have a full curriculum.

    But I think that anytime you have a gut feeling as a mama teacher that you need to pause and master something, it's probably a good idea.

    Leave a comment:


  • cherylswope
    replied
    Welcome!

    What if you go back to FSR Book D? Some of those skills are presented quickly for SC students. Use the companion Classical Phonics word lists, pull the silent e phonogram cards (which you now have from Level 2), and play her favorite SC 1 phonics games with words and patterns from FSR Book D.

    Do the same with the concepts or math facts she needs to review from SC 1 Arithmetic. If you missed anything in SC 1, such as Science Read-Alouds for general knowledge or biblical literacy & copybook, teach from all of this for only a month or two as structured review. You can refer to the 8-week review schedule at the back of your SC 1 CM for additional ideas if days seem too short.

    Then proceed to Level 2!

    We're happy to have you here.

    Leave a comment:


  • tmitchellrn
    started a topic In between level 1 and level 2

    In between level 1 and level 2

    Hello! 1st time posting here.
    I have a dd that is 10. She has a complex medical diagnosis
    which includes academic delays. She has completed level 1 SC and we are/ were moving in to level 2. But I have noticed she is struggling with the some of the math review and she really struggles with magic e concept. ( she is very literal so she wants to sound out every letter).

    My thoughts are : stop on level 2 and wait for the fall
    focus on mastering the silent e rule and math facts

    Struggling with what to do.. any advice would be appreciated.
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