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    #16
    Originally posted by Mom2mthj View Post

    Could you post the name of the book? I can’t currently find my notes from Sodalitas.
    Here you go! Grammar by Design, 2nd edition, by Cindy L. Vitto.

    The section in the back on usage and commonly mistaken words is worth the price alone for a high-school student to have in the home. Check used sites as well. I'm on Chapter 10, and among the examples, exercises that act like quizzes and the answer key, I have found it an incredibly useful course. I feel even more confident in my ability to grade and shape good writing, and I feel like I have a complete grasp of the grammar concepts presented in FFL.

    Did you catch the use of among? Prior to the book, I would have used "between."
    Mama to 2

    Summer:
    MPK with SC1 Phonics & Math
    SY 20/21
    4A

    Comment


      #17
      I finally have a quiet moment to recap the appointment and the week. It went well. As well as could be expected.

      The backstory is that dad doesn't believe in our son's diagnosis. As such, he hijacked this update to demand a full re-evaluation. Fine. Fine. We did an initial tele-health conference earlier in the month so that this new doc could get a grasp on whether we were in the ballpark or shopping around for a diagnosis. We made it past the first gate keeper and she requested an in-person follow-up. After multiple covid screenings to be allowed entry to the hospital, to registration, to outpatient care area....we were in.

      Even after his telehealth introduction, the son was non-plussed with the in person chat. Really had no interest in her or answering her questions. We were quickly separated, as I expected. The son went to another room for written testing. His dad and I were left in an empty patient room in silence with nothing to do. After 2 hours they were back. We were allowed a quick break to wander the hospital a bit and take bathroom breaks. Upon return, she gave his dad and I two questionaires each, an ASQ for teenagers and a social-emotional battery. The son went back to the other room for more hands-on testing; role playing and games. After about an hour we switched rooms. Now, it was parents turn with the doc. Took about an hour.

      She concluded our conversation with outright dismissing two possible concerns we had, bi-polar and oppositional defiant disorder. Whew. Then she clearly stated that she didn't need to review any documentation, notes, or tests to concur that our son does in fact have autism. She said she would review the notes and tests to determine a specific level. Right now, his standing diagnosis is level 2. We'll see what she determines. She expressed concern over organizational skills and that she may add to his diagnoses, but probably wouldn't eliminate any of his current ones. This was rather upsetting to his dad, as I guess he was aiming for total elimination of all diagnoses.

      We have our follow-up telehealth appointment middle of this week to discuss final results. I'm impressed with her quick turn around.

      Seems like a great doc. Said her goal was to figure out the best way to support us and her patient. She would come to the table with ideas of how to use his strengths to shore up his weaknesses. Her underlying idea is that no kid wants to act inappropriately or in unexpected ways and we need to find ways to encourage him along life's path.

      One thing I learned was more compassion. At the end of the day I was exhausted. I was in bed by 7:30. I realized this must be how he feels every single day. Trying so hard to keep it together that it's literally exhausting.

      Thank you for your prayers. I think it was Anita that posted a prayer or a quote by a Pope. I re-read it several times while sitting in my silent patient room. It was very reassuring to know that God has us in His hands and His will would be done.
      Married to DH for 14 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

      DS11- Simply Classical 5/6
      DD9- Simply Classical 5/6 (neurotypical, but schooling with big brother to save mom's sanity)
      DD 6- Classic Core First Grade

      We've completed:
      Classic Core Jr. kindergarten, kindergarten, first grade, and second grade.
      Simply Classical levels B, C, 1, 2, 3, and 4.

      Comment


        #18
        This....


        “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
        ~Pope St John Paul II

        It has kept my focus on Him through this and was incredibly reassuring. Thanks Anita!
        Married to DH for 14 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

        DS11- Simply Classical 5/6
        DD9- Simply Classical 5/6 (neurotypical, but schooling with big brother to save mom's sanity)
        DD 6- Classic Core First Grade

        We've completed:
        Classic Core Jr. kindergarten, kindergarten, first grade, and second grade.
        Simply Classical levels B, C, 1, 2, 3, and 4.

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by Colomama View Post
          This....


          “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
          ~Pope St John Paul II

          It has kept my focus on Him through this and was incredibly reassuring. Thanks Anita!
          Aw, honey — you are so welcome ❤️ It spoke to *me*, which is why I quoted it.
          I’m out of town right now so I can’t spend much time responding, but I just wanted to reiterate that I’m here for the news and the prayers and the, “My husband doesn’t get it,” part. W has autism as well (not even a tiny surprise) and my hubby just... let’s say, “Deals with it in his own way.” He understands but then he doesn’t. It varies by behavior and mood. We don’t talk a lot about it. But, honestly, that’s okay. My son is a PERSON, not a diagnosis. And we take him as he is.
          Boy Wonder: 12, Seton and MP Electives (Special Needs)
          Joy Bubble: 10, Seton and MP Electives (Special Needs)
          Snuggly Cowboy: 8, Seton and MP Electives
          The Comedian: 4, Seton/MP Pre-K, though she’ll probably zoom through that in a week.

          “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
          ~Pope St John Paul II

          Comment


            #20
            So, the down and dirty answer after our follow-up. Nothing changed. She adjusted his level for autism from 2 to 1, but upon questioning said he was really in both and so she just went with the the lower level. If there was a 1.5, she would've chose that.

            His IQ was unchanged, sitting at 81, but his score was drug down by a very low processing speed (66) and a low short term memory (82). Same as three years ago. So the idea of throwing out those scores and sticking with his other averages puts him at an IQ of 91. I asked if she was willing to throw lower scores if she would do the same with his too two scores. She didn't like that at all.

            His father was disappointed/ shocked, I don't know, that his diagnosis stuck. He has no new diagnoses, but she recommended a thorough learning disability screening.

            That's the reader's digest answer.
            Married to DH for 14 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

            DS11- Simply Classical 5/6
            DD9- Simply Classical 5/6 (neurotypical, but schooling with big brother to save mom's sanity)
            DD 6- Classic Core First Grade

            We've completed:
            Classic Core Jr. kindergarten, kindergarten, first grade, and second grade.
            Simply Classical levels B, C, 1, 2, 3, and 4.

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by Colomama View Post
              I finally have a quiet moment to recap the appointment and the week. It went well. As well as could be expected.

              The backstory is that dad doesn't believe in our son's diagnosis. As such, he hijacked this update to demand a full re-evaluation. Fine. Fine. We did an initial tele-health conference earlier in the month so that this new doc could get a grasp on whether we were in the ballpark or shopping around for a diagnosis. We made it past the first gate keeper and she requested an in-person follow-up. After multiple covid screenings to be allowed entry to the hospital, to registration, to outpatient care area....we were in.

              Even after his telehealth introduction, the son was non-plussed with the in person chat. Really had no interest in her or answering her questions. We were quickly separated, as I expected. The son went to another room for written testing. His dad and I were left in an empty patient room in silence with nothing to do. After 2 hours they were back. We were allowed a quick break to wander the hospital a bit and take bathroom breaks. Upon return, she gave his dad and I two questionaires each, an ASQ for teenagers and a social-emotional battery. The son went back to the other room for more hands-on testing; role playing and games. After about an hour we switched rooms. Now, it was parents turn with the doc. Took about an hour.

              She concluded our conversation with outright dismissing two possible concerns we had, bi-polar and oppositional defiant disorder. Whew. Then she clearly stated that she didn't need to review any documentation, notes, or tests to concur that our son does in fact have autism. She said she would review the notes and tests to determine a specific level. Right now, his standing diagnosis is level 2. We'll see what she determines. She expressed concern over organizational skills and that she may add to his diagnoses, but probably wouldn't eliminate any of his current ones. This was rather upsetting to his dad, as I guess he was aiming for total elimination of all diagnoses.

              We have our follow-up telehealth appointment middle of this week to discuss final results. I'm impressed with her quick turn around.

              Seems like a great doc. Said her goal was to figure out the best way to support us and her patient. She would come to the table with ideas of how to use his strengths to shore up his weaknesses. Her underlying idea is that no kid wants to act inappropriately or in unexpected ways and we need to find ways to encourage him along life's path.

              One thing I learned was more compassion. At the end of the day I was exhausted. I was in bed by 7:30. I realized this must be how he feels every single day. Trying so hard to keep it together that it's literally exhausting.

              Thank you for your prayers. I think it was Anita that posted a prayer or a quote by a Pope. I re-read it several times while sitting in my silent patient room. It was very reassuring to know that God has us in His hands and His will would be done.
              This is beautiful.

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by Colomama View Post
                So, the down and dirty answer after our follow-up. Nothing changed. She adjusted his level for autism from 2 to 1, but upon questioning said he was really in both and so she just went with the the lower level. If there was a 1.5, she would've chose that.

                His IQ was unchanged, sitting at 81, but his score was drug down by a very low processing speed (66) and a low short term memory (82). Same as three years ago. So the idea of throwing out those scores and sticking with his other averages puts him at an IQ of 91. I asked if she was willing to throw lower scores if she would do the same with his too two scores. She didn't like that at all.

                His father was disappointed/ shocked, I don't know, that his diagnosis stuck. He has no new diagnoses, but she recommended a thorough learning disability screening.

                That's the reader's digest answer.
                It sounds as if your husband was disappointed/shocked because the diagnoses of autism was confirmed, rather than dismissed. Perhaps he had been certain that autism had gone away or, better yet, was never there in the first place!

                With the persistent evidence of autism (as you already knew), now you will help your husband understand the present and long-term implications of this. Your son has complex needs. Does the evaluator have at-a-glance fact sheets on autism you and your husband could read together? Does she have suggestions for supplements, medications, alternative approaches to behavior? At 11-12, the impact of your husband on your son will only increase, so you have the important task of helping both of your men right now.

                Did he have any high subtests within the overall test? Did she give you any indication of your son's strengths? The learning disability evaluation may reveal more to you in this area and give you more guidance not only for everyday teaching but also for guiding him toward volunteering and eventual work opportunities.


                Regarding the overall IQ measure, if is any comfort my daughter Michelle's overall IQ places her even lower. With the new measures on the WISC-V, she scored in the 70s or "borderline intellectual disability" range. Like your son, her processing and memory scores pull everything downward. I would not worry too much about this except for the undeniable implication that expectations need to be realistic. This is especially true as our children approach teen and adult years with corresponding expectations of masterful executive function, social skills, and independent daily living. These are all greatly impacted by low processing and working memory. Your son will need a tremendous amount of support in areas taken for granted by many children and parents.

                When you're ready to boost those processing and memory abilities, tackle all of these with increased fervor:
                - Oral recitations to start each day
                - Memory work, including Scripture verses, math facts, poetry
                - His favorite individual brain games: crossword puzzles, mazes, dot-to-dots
                - Mentally active leisure: board games, card games, Dominoes. Let him be the scorekeeper. The other night when keeping score during our 1000-point tournament, my son said as if he could feel it, "This is helping my brain!"
                - Learn to type or learn to play an instrument. Unlike isolated brain exercises, this can strengthen the mind while teaching transferable skills.

                Don't give up. Your son is still young. The most important takeaway from the evaluation is that your son still needs your steady, strong help!

                Thank you for the updates. Hearing that you were in bed at 7:30 that night tells the story of what you are carrying -- and of what we all carry. But we are not alone. You and your family remain in our prayers.

                Comment


                  #23
                  I will be praying for both of you Colomama and Anita. We need to do update evaluations soon too. I've also dealt with dealing with declining parents also. It's so tough!

                  Colomama Thanks for the reminder about how hard they work to keep it together. I need that reminder for dealing with all three of my children.
                  Susan

                  2020-21
                  A (12) - Simply Classical 5/6
                  C (11) - Simply Classical 5/6
                  G (7) - Simply Classical 1

                  Comment

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