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Newly diagnosed Dyslexia for incoming first grader

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    Newly diagnosed Dyslexia for incoming first grader

    Hi!

    After spending a few months on phonics earlier this year and noticing some significant difficulties, we decided to have our 6.5 year old son assessed for Dyslexia.

    We got the results back yesterday and yes je is Dyslexic, Moderate.

    Here are some of his strengths: he is highly proficient in comprehension (95th percentile), vocabulary, memory, and math. He is currently thriving in Rod and Staff 1st grade math. He loves it.

    His weaknesses are mostly all in phonological awareness and anything related to distinguishing letters and words from each other.

    For example, at the moment, he cant distinguish between M and R. I think he knows A and S though.

    He memorizes things easily so he was able to compensate quite a bit before.

    So, phonics. Where do I start and what do I get?

    He is not reading at all independently yet. He can get through a phonics lesson but anything outside of that he cant read.

    He also is not writing on his own but rather, asks us to write things down for him.

    Help...


    Betty Wicks


    Married mom to 4 kids and 1 one on the way. We have been a homeschool family since 2015.

    I have two kids with Special Needs: 10 year old with Autism and a 6 year old with Dyslexia.

    #2
    Good for you to obtain the testing. I'm sorry about the results, but at least this confirms what you suspected. The good news is that you are learning this while he is young. The equally good news is that he is very strong in comprehension, vocabulary, memory, and math. This will help you tremendously when teaching him.

    Please remind us what you have been teaching so far.
    - Has he progressed all the way through SC Level C, in which we attack letter i.d., sounds, and other elements of phonological awareness?
    - Have you taught from SC Level 1?

    Comment


      #3
      We did not know that he had any special needs, so I had him at Kindergarten level, and was doin a regular phonics program for him for grade K. It was not a memoria press program though. Obviously, it was not working, and now I know why!

      He was doing MP Copywork, and doing the K readings. I noticed he was not writing at all or even attempting so I was doing all lessons orally.

      I pretty much need to start from scratch with him because he needs help with letter recognition and he is not an independent reader at all yet.

      Betty Wicks


      Married mom to 4 kids and 1 one on the way. We have been a homeschool family since 2015.

      I have two kids with Special Needs: 10 year old with Autism and a 6 year old with Dyslexia.

      Comment


        #4
        You might teach from Simply Classical Level C for letter recognition, sounds, and writing. Customize math by moving upward through the Customize Tab to select the math at his level. In SC C we target each letter and sound, we work on fine-motor skills with the letter and sound as the focus, and by the end of Level C the child begins to blend sounds into words. From there he may progress directly to SC 1 in which he will learn to read. Continue to customize his math upward; otherwise, leave all as is. In Level C we build in "asychronous" studies, such as Aesop's Fables and more advanced animal studies that will appeal to his higher vocabulary and comprehension. Similarly, in Level 1 we include science, art studies, and more. From Levels C and 1, he will progress to Levels 2 and 3, in which we build reading fluency.

        After Levels C, 1, 2, 3, he may be able to transfer to the MP Classical Core, or he may prefer studying from Simply Classical. Either way, continue customizing his math upward.

        If he has developed any undue discouragement or behavioral issues, you might consider adding Myself & Others Book One Core Set & Read-Alouds this year. This is a 14-week course.

        Feel free to follow up if you have any questions or concerns.

        Comment


          #5
          Okay that sounds like a great start
          Yes, he needs the basics for letters and decoding and reading overall right now.

          I have been meaning to get the Myself and Others Set for my oldest. My cup feels a little full right now! But, being as how I have two kiddos now with special needs, I should probably just jump in.


          Thank you VERY much!
          Betty Wicks


          Married mom to 4 kids and 1 one on the way. We have been a homeschool family since 2015.

          I have two kids with Special Needs: 10 year old with Autism and a 6 year old with Dyslexia.

          Comment


            #6
            Can he distinguish sounds by ear? Like if you say /m/ and /r/, can he tell that they are different sounds? Unless he can both hear and see the difference, reading will be terribly difficult.

            A program like Barton is a gold standard for dyslexia but it is very expensive (like $200-$300 per level). It is worth it if less intense programs don't work, but I would be inclined to take a year to a year to two to work through SC C and SC 1 first, since somethings an explicit phonics program like FSR can be enough. MP does teach phonics very well with FSR and Traditional Spelling. But I digress, I would probably try to do SC C a bit quicker than written. "As slow as you need but as fast as you can" is how I would approach it. SC C does do a good job at teaching letter recognition, sound awareness, and phonological awareness. The Phonics from A to Z is great. If you go through SC C and SC 1 and he still struggles a lot, then I would suggest Barton. No one here is going to push you to stay with SC or MP products if they aren't working.

            I have used Barton levels 1-part of 4 and parts of SC A-C and 1-4.
            sfhargett
            Senior Member
            Last edited by sfhargett; 08-12-2020, 05:21 PM. Reason: Edited because I hit enter too soon.
            Susan

            2021-2022
            A (13) - Simply Classical 7/8
            C (12) - Simply Classical 7/8
            G (8) - Simply Classical 1

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by sfhargett View Post
              Can he distinguish sounds by ear? Like if you say /m/ and /r/, can he tell that they are different sounds? Unless he can both hear and see the difference, reading will be terribly difficult.

              A program like Barton is a gold standard for dyslexia but it is very expensive (like $200-$300 per level). It is worth it if less intense programs don't work, but I would be inclined to take a year to a year to two to work through SC C and SC 1 first, since somethings an explicit phonics program like FSR can be enough. MP does teach phonics very well with FSR and Traditional Spelling. But I digress, I would probably try to do SC C a bit quicker than written. "As slow as you need but as fast as you can" is how I would approach it. SC C does do a good job at teaching letter recognition, sound awareness, and phonological awareness. The Phonics from A to Z is great. If you go through SC C and SC 1 and he still struggles a lot, then I would suggest Barton. No one here is going to push you to stay with SC or MP products if they aren't working.

              I have used Barton levels 1-part of 4 and parts of SC A-C and 1-4.
              Another vote for Barton here. Levels are expensive, but the resale value is also very high, so you end up with a net cost of about $50- $100 per level in my experience. We went through MP K, using FSR, had my son diagnosed, and then used Barton levels 1-2, and moved over to SImply Classical Storytime Treasures.

              If he can't distinguish sounds by ear, you may need to have him evaluated by an audiologist. He may have some hearing issues that are contributing to his inability to distinguish between the sounds.

              Also, was he diagnosed with dysgraphia as well? You may have to spend some time helping him with fine motor practice, etc.
              Plans for 2021-22

              Year 11 of homeschooling with MP

              DD1 - 26 - Small Business owner with 2 locations
              DD2 - 15 - 10th grade - HLS Cottage School/MPOA/True North Academy/Vita Beata - equestrian
              DS3 - 13 -6A Cottage School - soccer/tennis -dyslexia and dysgraphia
              DS4 - 13 - 6A Cottage School -soccer -auditory processing disorder
              DD5 - 9 - 4A, Cottage School/MPOA -equestrian
              DS6 - 7 - MPK - first time at the Cottage School this fall!

              Comment

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