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Mixing concepts

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    Mixing concepts

    I'm currently using the phonemic awareness ideas in Phonics A to Z for my 8yo as we go back through SC1. She's retaining very well so far, but when I suggest reading at a slightly higher level (Runt Pig reader from AAR) since she does know the blends involved, she's obviously uncomfortable with it. So we've been sitting tight with CVC readers for now. My question is: how do I do the phonemic segmentation activities if she's uncomfortable reading blends? I think she's okay doing them orally. Is that enough for now, until we get to blends again in FSR?
    Jennifer
    Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

    DS16: MP, MPOA, HSC, Breaking the Barrier French
    DS15: MP, MPOA, HSC
    DS12: Mash-up of 6/7M
    DS11: SC 4
    DD9: 3A with First Form Latin (long story!)
    DD8: Mash-up of SC 1/2
    DD5: January birthday, using SC B and C as a two-year JrK

    #2
    Hi, Jen. This is tricky without seeing and hearing her read in person. I know you've thought about this from many angles.

    From here it seems you could stay the course with FSR A-C with the SC 1 plans and use only the Phonics from A to Z recommendations that accompany FSR A-C. This will avoid hitting premature roadblocks such as the ones you describe. You will want to avoid creating a scenario of guessing (or frustration). Try to keep her oral reading in line with the books recommended in Phonics from A to Z for each short vowel sound, if you have time to find them. If not, create a big list of nonsense CVC words for practice. Use the Silly Party invitations, as in the SC 1 plans, to make this a little more fun. Do not worry too much about fluency at this point; you're teaching decoding with the hope that this big push will prove successful. It may also prove diagnostic, but for now you're saving money by trying to teach what you have in front of you. Just don't move past that.

    Many of the thoughts in your previous thread may be good reminders or useful tips as you continue. Keep us posted. This has been a tough season for you!
    cherylswope I was going to email you about this, but figured I would post here in case it can help anyone else. My daughter just turned 8 on Monday. Between her struggles, scheduling challenges, and my health, she's in Week 22 of Level 2 — she started that level in September of 2018. I'm realizing more and more that most of

    Comment


      #3
      She can read the stories with the blends and such that she has learned, but they tend to take more work for her (but even that depends on the day) so I think they make her a bit nervous. She always has books in her hands though, trying to read them, and she told me last week that she wants to learn how to read the Book House books (we have the 1930's set from my mother-in-law). So she has a great outlook on reading despite all her struggles.

      Because of the season we're in right now, we do 30-45 minutes of phonics/reading on M, W, F followed by XtraMath for fact practice. T/Th are listening to classic literature on audiobook and using XtraMath. With all the health hiccups, we're currently on Week 6 of the SC1 plans. Our couch fell apart so if I'm having a bad day, I have to be in my room. I told the kids that, from now on, we'll do school in my room if needed so we don't miss it.

      Thank you for the reminder about the book lists in Phonics A to Z. I'll look at those again so we can expand our reading options.

      Here's what we've been aiming for during our lesson time. Does this line up with what you're thinking for her? Do I need to adjust anywhere?


      DAY ONE

      Letter Recognition
      (she struggled with lowercase letter recognition on her assessments; I'll show a sandpaper letter, she'll give the name; I'll point to a letter on a mixed-up chart and she'll give the name)

      Phonemic Oddity— Oral and Print
      Find the word with a different first sound
      Find the word with a different vowel sound
      Find the word with a different word family

      SC1 Lesson Plan Work (including FSR TM activities, multi-sensory activities, etc)

      Word Building: Blending
      Give word, change given sound to new given sound (alphabet tiles, marker board, etc)

      Reading

      __________________________________________________ ____

      DAY TWO

      Rhyme work (reading a poem and finding the rhyming words, or giving some words and then she gives words that rhyme)

      Phonemic Blending — ORAL AND PRINT
      Syllable (only for 2+ syllable words -- not there yet)
      Onset/rime
      Sound

      SC1 Lesson plan work

      Word Building: Awareness
      Give word, change to new given word (alphabet tiles, marker board, etc)

      Reading

      __________________________________________________ ____

      DAY THREE

      Sound recognition
      Point to letter for given sound
      Say sound for given letter

      Phonemic Oddity — ORAL AND PRINT
      Add a word with the same first sound
      Add a word with the same vowel sound
      Add a word with the same word family

      SC1 Lesson plan work

      Word Sort: Open (I give her some word cards and she sorts them in any way she likes, we then talk about how she sorted them -- by vowel, by first letter, by word family, whatever the case may be)

      Reading

      __________________________________________________ ____

      DAY FOUR

      Rhyme work (as above)

      Phonemic Segmentation — ORAL AND PRINT (using beads/elkonin boxes -- very limited right now since we're only in CVC)
      Syllable (only for 2+ syllable words, not there yet)
      Onset/rime
      Sound

      SC1 Lesson plan work

      Word Sort: Closed (I choose the category to sort by; we haven't gotten to this one as much)

      Reading

      __________________________________________________ ____

      DAY FIVE


      Dictation
      Words
      Sentences

      SC1 Lesson plan work

      Reading
      Jennifer
      Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

      DS16: MP, MPOA, HSC, Breaking the Barrier French
      DS15: MP, MPOA, HSC
      DS12: Mash-up of 6/7M
      DS11: SC 4
      DD9: 3A with First Form Latin (long story!)
      DD8: Mash-up of SC 1/2
      DD5: January birthday, using SC B and C as a two-year JrK

      Comment


        #4
        This looks good and thorough. How does she do with dictation on Day Five?

        I love that she has books in her hands and tries to read. So earnest!

        Comment


          #5
          As long as it's CVC and very basic common words, she does great with dictation. She's always enjoyed that part!
          Jennifer
          Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

          DS16: MP, MPOA, HSC, Breaking the Barrier French
          DS15: MP, MPOA, HSC
          DS12: Mash-up of 6/7M
          DS11: SC 4
          DD9: 3A with First Form Latin (long story!)
          DD8: Mash-up of SC 1/2
          DD5: January birthday, using SC B and C as a two-year JrK

          Comment


            #6
            I have no idea if this is the way to do things, but yesterday I read the little story I was trying to get my son to read first. Usually I make him sound everything out that I know he knows the sounds for. Instead of him complaining for 5 minutes and sounding out half the words, he read willingly and only sounded out a couple.

            Comment


              #7
              You didn't mention whether she struggles with initial blends or terminal blends. My youngest struggles with end sounds beyond plural -s. He is much more likely to hear a beginning sound than end sound. Even that could give you more pointed guidance for where to focus your energies. The terminal dt sound is very hard for many children to distinguish. I would think some of the word lists in Classical Phonics might set up patterns of words that have whatever blend you want to work on. Or, print some out, write them out, or type them out in large font on a laptop you have in bed with you. Recognition is easier than....what's the word....coming up with the answer. I'll frequently copy & paste pictures into Word and have my kids match letters or words. Do the Core Skills pages offer anything like this that would be fun, too? Even those Explode the Code workbooks offer an interesting ease into blends. It's very repetitive.
              Mama to 2, Married 18 years

              Summer:
              DS 6-MPK with SC1 Phonics & Math
              Fall 2020
              DD9-4A

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by enbateau View Post
                You didn't mention whether she struggles with initial blends or terminal blends. My youngest struggles with end sounds beyond plural -s. He is much more likely to hear a beginning sound than end sound. Even that could give you more pointed guidance for where to focus your energies. The terminal dt sound is very hard for many children to distinguish. I would think some of the word lists in Classical Phonics might set up patterns of words that have whatever blend you want to work on. Or, print some out, write them out, or type them out in large font on a laptop you have in bed with you. Recognition is easier than....what's the word....coming up with the answer. I'll frequently copy & paste pictures into Word and have my kids match letters or words. Do the Core Skills pages offer anything like this that would be fun, too? Even those Explode the Code workbooks offer an interesting ease into blends. It's very repetitive.
                Yes, we did some of the informal assessments from the Phonics A to Z resources and that, combined with other things we were observing, showed us that she has trouble in a wide range of areas related to phonemic awareness, both oral and print, despite "reading" books like Little Bear:

                1. Unable to tell which words rhyme in a set of three words unless she sees the words written down, and unable to add a rhyming word to two given, rhyming words; most children learn to distinguish rhyme orally first, she was relying on the spelling to determine rhyme. My sister (a Kindergarten teacher) helped me work with her on this and her rhyming is going much better now.
                2. Inconsistent identification of lowercase letters
                3. Inconsistent ability to apply short vowel sounds to a word despite being able to recite their sounds in order and mixed
                4. Consistent uncertainty about whether to use short or long vowel sounds despite two years of work in that area
                5. More likely to hear the beginning sound(s) of a word than the ending sound(s) regardless of the length of the word; she also tends to shorten the ends of words in speech, as if she's unsure what they should sound like.
                6. Tendency to mix the sounds in a word as if trying to process all of them at once; we verified that she is actually seeing them in order, but her brain seems to be processing them out of order. This is why she struggles with non-CVC words -- she knows the blends, but she doesn't process them separately from the other sounds in the word. Same as her vowels in #4.
                7. Reliance on memory of a story, pictures, and context clues ("what would make sense here") in order to read. This is why we have to avoid picture cards. I also have to cover the pictures in her readers and make sure she's not looking through them in advance, or listening to siblings read them; otherwise I have no way of knowing if she's actually reading the words or just remembering/inferring them.

                Interestingly, her writing-from-dictation abilities are quite good. We also found that if she's having trouble sounding out a word in a book, she's suddenly able to read it if she writes it down. I think it forces her to process each sound on its own.

                These may be signs of auditory processing issues, or they may be signs of dyslexia...or something completely unexpected. We won't know until we can have a full evaluation done. Obviously, the current situation put a hiccup in that.

                So all that to say...lots going on here and her compensation strengths actually tie my hands a bit when it comes to what I can/can't do to shore up her weaknesses.

                Jennifer
                Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

                DS16: MP, MPOA, HSC, Breaking the Barrier French
                DS15: MP, MPOA, HSC
                DS12: Mash-up of 6/7M
                DS11: SC 4
                DD9: 3A with First Form Latin (long story!)
                DD8: Mash-up of SC 1/2
                DD5: January birthday, using SC B and C as a two-year JrK

                Comment


                  #9
                  cherylswope I was looking at the book lists in Phonics A to Z, but they appear to be above her independent reading level. We have some of them (that she miraculously hasn't memorized) and she really wants to try reading our copy of Millions of Cats despite it being above her level. Do you think it's okay to team read through them as long as she's interested or would that set her back for her independent reading?
                  Jennifer
                  Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

                  DS16: MP, MPOA, HSC, Breaking the Barrier French
                  DS15: MP, MPOA, HSC
                  DS12: Mash-up of 6/7M
                  DS11: SC 4
                  DD9: 3A with First Form Latin (long story!)
                  DD8: Mash-up of SC 1/2
                  DD5: January birthday, using SC B and C as a two-year JrK

                  Comment


                    #10
                    jen1134 There may be pro's and con's either way. Follow your instinct here. If you want to wait, you can use the book as an incentive to keep plugging away at phonetic readiness or read the book as a read-aloud.

                    If you decide to have her read Millions of Cats or any other non-controlled readers, you might do a few things: 1) pre-read difficult words (millions) by pointing out phonetic components she knows, 2) pre-mark with a pencil any shorter sentence within her phonetic reading ability. Whenever she sees your checkmark or star, she may read. Otherwise, you read while she follows along, 3) take one or two words from the book that fall into categories you're teaching (e.g., "cat") and use these to spark a teaching activity on a whiteboard. Millions of Cats can become Millions of ... Mats, Hats, Bats, etc.

                    I love her eagerness!

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