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Teaching End Sounds

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    Teaching End Sounds

    Could I get some advice on teaching end sounds of CVC words? My 5yo in SC-C is still doing very well with the Alphabet Book and is reading 35+ CVC words each day with near 90% accuracy from the Classical Phonics book. He is struggling with his ability to hear and identify end sound consonants of CVC (or really any length) word auditorily. He can identify all letter sounds at the beginning of words. When I write the word on the board, he can read it and see which letter comes at the end and identify it by sight. He cannot at all hear the end sound if I ask, "What letter comes at the end of 'cat?' What sound do you hear at the end of the word 'caT?'" He is so used to identifying the beginning sound that he tries to repeat the first sound over and over, guessing that. Does it just take time?

    When we segment a word into its phonemes, he can instantly pick the end sound, but he often cannot organically segment a word outside of my help. So, for instance, with the word CAT, I'll ask what the first sound he hears is, and he'll give a "kuh," and then I'll ask what comes next, "/kuh/ and then..." and he can often do the middle vowel sound, but he'll scroll through a list of similar sounding final consonants (like T instead of G, M instead of N, T instead of K, etc). Does this betray his lack of full mastery of the letter sounds? Or are end sounds difficult for all kids?

    We have a great game from Melissa & Doug Called Sound Street where the student matches pictures to beginning, middle or end sounds, but while the beginning sound is very easy for him, the end sound is frustrating and difficult for him. He is healthy and just recently had new ear tubes put in, so there's no fluid on the ear. He can hear perfectly well.
    Mama to 2

    Summer:
    MPK with SC1 Phonics & Math
    SY 20/21
    4A

    #2
    Good morning. Since you are still in the Alphabet Book portion of the level you are fine. The skill of identifying that final consonant sound is a more challenging one. Give yourself until the end of First Start Reading Book A to have it mastered. I think a little more time is needed for this skill. Another reason not to worry yet is the fact that when you over enunciate individual sounds, he can identify the letter. Practice exactly what is meant by the ending or last sound. Again, that just takes some time but is not an indicator of lack of letter sound mastery. Keep us posted!

    Comment


      #3
      Agreed. Ending sounds are more difficult. Not only do we teach and practice these far less often than beginning sounds, but they are more difficult to distinguish! They were more challenging for my children too.




      Rather than asking him to identify the ending sound right now, you might simply teach the ending sound. c-a-t . "The last sound we hear is /t/." Exaggerate it. Then give him two cards, letter tiles, or paper plates with the letter representing two vastly different sounds, e.g., /t/ and /l/. With the word in front of him, say the word and have him hold up the sound he hears. Give him a point if he gets it correct. Then erase the word. Say the word again. Give him two points if he answers correctly without the word in front of him.

      In other words, make each lesson very successful for quite some time. (This will help break the "I can't do this" feeling.) Each day, keep teaching, just as Michelle T suggested.


      enbateau, the following is all very encouraging:
      1. My 5yo in SC-C is still doing very well with the Alphabet Book and is reading 35+ CVC words each day with near 90% accuracy from the Classical Phonics book.
      2. He can identify all letter sounds at the beginning of words.
      3. When we segment a word into its phonemes, he can instantly pick the end sound.
      When you think of how much time you have spent on beginning sounds by contrast, you can give yourself more time to teach this and let him practice, just as you did with beginning sounds.

      Comment


        #4
        Thanks for the expertise. I played a far less significant role in teaching my daughter to read, so this is all new to me. It's also surprising when a child can read basic words and still be caught up in the basics.

        As an aside, his handwriting is getting better each day. I'm a little torn as to how much letter-writing practice we should do. He still can't come up with any letters on his own, but he's down to limited dots as starting points for most of the letters he's been shown in SC C (A, D, C, F, G, H, B, P, and now N). At least due to practicing writing them, he's stellar at identifying them when he sees them. The type A in me wants mastery NOW, but I don't want to exhaust his actual ability.
        Mama to 2

        Summer:
        MPK with SC1 Phonics & Math
        SY 20/21
        4A

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by enbateau View Post
          As an aside, his handwriting is getting better each day. I'm a little torn as to how much letter-writing practice we should do. He still can't come up with any letters on his own, but he's down to limited dots as starting points for most of the letters he's been shown in SC C (A, D, C, F, G, H, B, P, and now N). At least due to practicing writing them, he's stellar at identifying them when he sees them. The type A in me wants mastery NOW, but I don't want to exhaust his actual ability.
          Yes, the dots sound like a good plan. He will have plenty of practice again in SC 1.

          I love this:
          "At least due to practicing writing them, he's stellar at identifying them when he sees them."

          Yes! That is the part people miss by omitting writing!



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