Announcement

Collapse

Disclaimer - Read This First

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

The educational and medical information on this website is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Cheryl Swope, M.Ed. and Memoria Press make no representations or warranties in relation to the information on this website.

You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or individualized advice from any other professional healthcare or educational provider. If you think you or your child may be suffering from any medical condition you should seek immediate medical attention.

You should never delay seeking medical or educational advice, disregard medical or educational advice, or discontinue medical or educational treatment because of any information on this website.
See more
See less

My SC Students' Catch Up Post

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    My SC Students' Catch Up Post

    Hi!
    I know it has been a while. I hope everyone is doing well. A little update on my two SC guys:

    G is FINALLY going to have testing through the school district even though he is not enrolled! I'm happy but very nervous. I'm not sure I trust these people but free ASD testing is free.

    He finished ALL his books in July, even his MP things (except lit guides. I cannot get him to do those even orally.) My biggest issue was his absolute refusal to memorize the States and Capitals. He loved filling in the book and maps and can correctly label a blank USA map so I am thinking to call that 'nuff done. He eventually made his own schedule with more work than I would have asigned for his MP subjects, too! Now after a break, we are having the usual dig in his heels thing. I hate this part of the year. Thankfully, I know as soon as he 'gets with the program', it will be over.

    He is going to be using MP for:
    -FMOR orally answering comp. questions and only filling in Drill questions
    -Geog 1 and USA Review
    -Tiner Hist. of Med and Biology using the book chapter quizzes only

    His other things are not MP so I am not sure if it is ok to post.

    M is making leaps and bounds with his speech. Some days he is even using the occasional 3 word sentence! He 'reads' to himself from his Jesus storybook and other books. He is doing much better with scissors since I bought him a child-sized pair of loop scissors. Daily, I have lots of confetti being made. He is recognizing lots of the letters and their sounds, counting to 20, and all the other goodies EXCEPT having enough control to write/draw or cut in a line. I am thinking he might be ready to move to SC B soon. I am a bit wary of that, though, because he is not even 3 yet! I'm supplementing SC A with Kumon books and other things I have laying around plus things F comes up with. She considers M her first homeschool student!

    So that is my 2 SC students catch up.
    Last edited by Enigma; 09-03-2019, 09:44 PM.
    The Homeschool Grads:
    J- 6/96
    S- 11/98

    Still Homeschooling:
    G- 4/04
    D- 5/05
    F- 7/08 (my only girl)

    Future Homeschooler:
    M- 9/16

    #2
    Hi, Enigma. Thanks for the updates!

    Your Map Studier will transition back to work and settle into his routine. I love that he made his own schedule with additional assignments.

    Your Language Learner will do well to stay with SC A until age 3. If you have a newer SC A Curriculum Manual, you will find on page 93 a suggested 8-week extension. This allows you to continue teaching without moving to B too early.

    Congratulations on all of the blossoming abilities in both students!

    Comment


      #3
      Hi Enigma,

      I just wanted to say thanks for sharing what your kids are up to, I find it so encouraging to hear where everyone else out there is at. Keep up the good work and I hope the testing is well done and helpful.

      Sarah

      Sarah

      Aussies from Sydney, Australia
      Miriam 9yo Latina Christiana, R&S4, IEW Phonetic Zoo, IEW Grammar
      Jonny 7yo (Special Needs) SC1 Phonics, R&S1
      Elissa (almost) 4yo K phonics, R&S Preschool books

      Together this term (in Circle Time) we are doing Bible time with SC1 Story Bible and our own memorisation/songs, Myself and Others 2, Homer Price, Greek Myths, IEW Poetry Memorisation, speech therapy, The Body Book, Artventure and picture books from SCB/SC1 etc.

      Thomas 17 months

      Comment


        #4
        Another little update:

        G's testing came through as Mild to Moderate Autism. Not surprising to us in the least, but it is nice to have something 'official'. What does that mean for daily life? Nothing changes. We keep doing what we are doing. We are not enrolling him. Hubby and I agree on that for sure. Should anything change?

        I'm worried about him turning 18. What, if anything, should be done legally? Anyone know? My guess is one school testing won't be enough for a court thing, will it?
        Last edited by Enigma; 11-26-2019, 11:06 PM.
        The Homeschool Grads:
        J- 6/96
        S- 11/98

        Still Homeschooling:
        G- 4/04
        D- 5/05
        F- 7/08 (my only girl)

        Future Homeschooler:
        M- 9/16

        Comment


          #5
          Good morning, Enigma.

          Re daily life -- The only thing that might change for your 15yo is a shift to thinking more intentionally about having him volunteer with a view to working outside the home one or two days a week. If you can pair him with a capable and compassionate adult in an area that interests him, this might be something to consider if you're not already doing this.

          Re 18 -- Yes, there are quite a few things to do. Some may depend on your location and on his future goals, but this was the progression for us:

          1. Consult with a financial planner who is abreast of matters such as special-needs trusts. Set up a trust, if the person so advises, to secure his assets and plan for his future financial stability without impacting any potential services he might obtain.
          2. Consider the "look back" period for assets and begin (asap) to distribute or otherwise utilize these accordingly.
          3. Amass your records. Anything that shows the long-term nature of his condition will be helpful for guardianship (full or partial), conservatorship, SSI, Medicaid, etc. Reports from physicians, PT/OT/Speech, school, other services need to be organized and ready to share.
          4. Consider consulting an attorney at age 17 for guardianship (full or partial) and/or conservatorship. All must be accomplished by the 18th birthday. This process can take time and may require an additional, appointed evaluator to determine the nature (severity, anticipated duration) of his disability, so 17 is not too early to begin.
          5. If you obtain guardianship, plan to carry those papers with you everywhere you go for the first few years after he turns 18. Every doctor's office will want to see these. This will allow you to be present in the exam, discuss any meds, etc.
          6. For us, guardianship (and the surrounding activities leading to guardianship) became the clear gateway to SSI, covered medical care, participation in our local board for developmental delay, and self-directed services. Others may access these without securing guardianship.
          7. Involve your son in the process along the way. Ask him about his own goals. Explain that you are partnering with those goals to give him the greatest success and personal freedom while respecting and caring for his needs. Having guardianship or conservatorship will not translate to "depriving him" of his individuality, his dreams, or his ambition, nor will SSI or any other form of assistance. Rather, these are safety nets under which he can soar more confidently with any level of support he needs along the way.

          Big disclaimers: Every case is evaluated individually. I am not an attorney; I am only married to one. This was our path. Both of our adult children require 24/7 supervision and will always require this. Your situation may be quite different.


          It is good to hear that you have the official diagnosis now. Allow time to assimilate this. "He has autism," may ring through your mind for quite some time. Though expected, the words of a report take time to accept. How wonderful that you and your husband are on the same page regarding his schooling and life moving forward. Blessings to you and to your son!



          Comment


            #6
            This is Enigma's husband. Thank you for your advice. I've looked up a bit about it and will give it more thought and figure out where to start. These are quite unfamilar terms. I am much more knowledgable about this sort of thing works in the UK since my oldest brother was also special needs.
            The Homeschool Grads:
            J- 6/96
            S- 11/98

            Still Homeschooling:
            G- 4/04
            D- 5/05
            F- 7/08 (my only girl)

            Future Homeschooler:
            M- 9/16

            Comment

            Working...
            X