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Farmer Boy

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    Farmer Boy

    I know I will need lots of help! I hope my questions help others! I am looking at Lesson 1, first quotation. Can you guide me in a conversation? I have discussion thoughts/questions for the second quote, but could use guidance on the first.

    Second, discussion question 3. I see the answer and know that 5/6 kids in my “class” will need led to this answer, What series of questions should I ask? Also, would you present these questions at the time they are presented in the student guide, or where it comes up in the reading?

    Thank you!
    Christine

    (2019/2020)
    DD1 8/23/09 - SC5/6
    DS2 9/1/11 - SC3,4, 5/6 combo
    DD3 2/9/13 -SC2 to start, MP1 second semester

    Previous Years
    DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4’
    DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2)
    DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK)

    #2
    First, remember that these are merely opportunities for discussions. Second, remember that some of our SC children's minds blur many words together into meaninglessness if we converse too quickly or lecture with too much detail. Because of this, discussions are best "short and sweet" for our SC students.

    Some things are best presented ahead of time, while others are best presented by pausing when they appear in the reading. This will vary a little bit. The key, given so many of our students' difficulties with working memory, is to make sure everyone understands what is happening.

    The first quotation pertains to a strict, orderly classroom with which our homeschooled students may not be familiar. You might show a picture of a strict schoolroom as you describe the setting. If you plan ahead, you could role play with cooperative students willing to demonstrate "no whispering and no fidgeting. Everyone must be perfectly still and keep his eyes fixed on his lesson." You could do this before you ever read the selection in which the quotation is found, then read the quotation, then read the entire passage and pause when you come to the quotation in the chapter. Recall the picture you showed or the acting the students witnessed.

    Regarding discussion question 3 about why Mr. Corse gives the boys another chance, you might bring this close to home by asking if anyone in the room was ever given a second chance. If this is too abstract, you can first give an example yourself and then ask for a second example. Discuss why people give each other second chances, how rigid things would be if we never forgave each other, or how teachers want their students to succeed. Then when you come to the passage, you might examine Mr. Corse's actions specifically.

    The key to all of this comes from Leigh Lowe & Tanya Charlton's excellent training video on building from what students already know. This is far more than looking something up on the internet or in a dictionary, but rather bringing the story "home" to students. Maybe someone else can add some help here.


    I love how you plan ahead, btw. You have a good ability to foresee where troubles might be so you can plan ways to sidestep them!

    Comment


      #3
      Hi, Christine.

      These two questions you are asking about are probably easier to relate to in the classroom than the homeschool, especially that quote. We would compare our classrooms to Almanzo's classroom, and I guess you could compare your homeschool classroom to the traditional one-room classroom that Almanzo is in every day. Does everyone have to sit perfectly still? Are there advantages to that? You could also try sitting your kids on chairs where their feet don't touch the floor and compare it to the comfort of sitting in a chair where they can rest their feet.

      For the discussion question, you don't have to ask the students the question. You can just discuss it quickly (or skip it if it's not a question you want to talk about). "Do you think Mr. Corse is really afraid of the boys? That seems to be what Almanzo thinks. Or could he just be giving them the benefit of the doubt because he is a new teacher and doesn't know them yet? Maybe he is giving them a chance to recognize the rules and follow them - a chance to get to know his standards for the classroom. If you do something wrong, isn't it nice if you are given a warning not to do it again? Then it becomes your decision whether to behave or not. Anyway, we really don't know the answer to this question yet. But I bet if we keep reading, we will find out what happens in a later chapter."

      These questions can be interesting to discuss, but they shouldn't take up much time and they shouldn't make you have to work too hard! You also will be amazed at the answers kids come up with if you ask the questions - things you or I maybe haven't even thought about. But always feel free to say, " We really don't have the answer to this question, do we? Maybe we'll get it later, but it is certainly fun to think about. Sometimes the author doesn't explain things right away. And sometimes the author keeps you guessing, and you just have to do the best you can to figure things out."

      As long as the questions aren't on the test (And this one isn't!), feel free to skip the discussion questions you don't want to talk about. Teacher privilege!

      Tanya

      Comment


        #4
        If you're an Amazon Prime member, all seasons of Little House on the Prairie are available right now. A clip from one of those episodes might provide some concrete understanding of education in the late 1800s. Mrs. Beadle is a lovely school mistress. If you're interested, I could try to pick through a few to suggest.

        For my little guy in SC, he often requests videos of pioneer life to help understand the books we read. He begs his older sister to read him Farmer Boy. When he doesn't understand something, we all go to YouTube to watch a video. We have found Townsend a great channel (although he skews more 1700s than 1800s). I feel like I should create a master list of all the videos we've watched in Farmer Boy so far. We found good ones on yoking oxen, milking cows, weaving cloth, ice cutting, etc.

        We also used the ABC Book of Early Americana by Eric Sloane (MP2 book) for excellent drawings of vintage tools, craftsmanship and early machinery.
        Mama to 2, Married 17 years

        SY 19/20
        DD 8-3A
        DS 5-SC C

        Comment


          #5
          Thank you, very much! This was all very helpful! I am sure I will be back again asking more questions!!
          Christine

          (2019/2020)
          DD1 8/23/09 - SC5/6
          DS2 9/1/11 - SC3,4, 5/6 combo
          DD3 2/9/13 -SC2 to start, MP1 second semester

          Previous Years
          DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4’
          DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2)
          DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK)

          Comment

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