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Cursive Help

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    Cursive Help

    My son is 11 but developmentally more like 9. He is about halfway through SC 3. He's made a huge amount of progress over the last year when it comes to reading, so we're moving about double time through literature or it drags it on too long for him (I added books from More StoryTime Treasure SC doesn't cover between SC More StoryTime Treasure and Wagon Wheels). Writing is his bane. He's a boy, he's left handed, and he has special needs...I think you get the idea ;-) We tried cursive about a year ago, and he just wasn't ready for writing it. I'd had him tracing very large letters with his finger in therapy (printed out the NAC in StartWrite and laminated them), so he has what they look like down pat. He just couldn't write them with flow (would basically write each individual letter at a time, so even though they were connected he was really writing separate letters). So, I stopped and did modern manuscript (slanted, cursivish charactistics) as kind of an in-between. He must trace the letters or it's a disaster. I use StartWrite to create everything he must write so he can trace it. Today I printed out a sample of NAC 1, and he was able to trace the sample fluidly :-D So, even though he still must trace, I think we are to the point where we can begin to transition.

    Now to my question, how does SC handle the transition? Is the student writing in manuscript in all areas except penmanship while initially learning? I'm thinking of getting NAC 1 just as a refresher for letter formation (or creating my own sheets with NAC StartWrite), then starting to transition with literature, then writing, then etc. instead of the regular practice in NAC 1 (making my own sheets for him to trace with NAC StartWrite). Also, is there anything special about the SC Cursive individual lesson plans, or are they just assigning pages? Thanks!

    Here is the sample he did without any instruction (he remembered how to form the letters from the finger tracing). Not perfect, but so much better than even just 6 months ago!
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Cheryl in CA; 08-13-2019, 07:30 PM.
    Cheryl, mom to:

    ds 24, graduated
    ds 23, graduated
    dd 15, 9th Grade
    dd 12, 6th Grade
    ds 10, 4nd Grade

    #2
    Hi, Cheryl. In SC we begin with NAC 1, which is largely letter formation and practice for mastery of upper and lowercase letters.

    While NAC 1 includes some blending of letters into small, widely spaced words, such as cat, boy, vote, most of the program focuses on single letters. This would be an excellent refresher for your son. We teach NAC 1 in SC 2 and do not require any cursive writing outside of NAC 1 at that level. Requiring joined letters in all words would be placing the cart before the horse if the student has not yet completed NAC 1.

    Though we offer a cursive copybook in SC 2, this is for students with previous cursive experience. We do offer Cursive Practice Sheets, so you would not need to make your own.

    Based on everything you shared, for now I would do this:

    This Year -- NAC 1 PLUS either 1) Cursive Practice Sheets or 2) Copybook Two Cursive to accelerate his progress.
    Add both practice pieces simultaneously to NAC 1 ONLY if you know the combination will not overtire his hand or result in practiced sloppiness.
    And yes, the SC plans for NAC 1 are far more than mere scheduling. He will write to music, write with multi-modal impressions, and more.

    Next Summer -- Consider whichever you did not choose (Cursive Practice Sheets or Copybook Two Cursive) to keep his writing strong.

    Next Year -- Consider NAC 2, which will presume mastery of all letters and the readiness to join them fluently in closely spaced words within sentences. At this point, he can begin the Beginner My Thankfulness Journal which continues with tracing but also allows him to form his own words. At this point he may begin writing his assignments in cursive if ready.
    Simply Classical Copybook: Book Two, Cursive Sample Ages 5-8 (chronological age or skill level) Copybook is a time-honored activity in which students copy S

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
      Hi, Cheryl. In SC we begin with NAC 1, which is largely letter formation and practice for mastery of upper and lowercase letters.

      While NAC 1 includes some blending of letters into small, widely spaced words, such as cat, boy, vote, most of the program focuses on single letters. This would be an excellent refresher for your son. We teach NAC 1 in SC 2 and do not require any cursive writing outside of NAC 1 at that level. Requiring joined letters in all words would be placing the cart before the horse if the student has not yet completed NAC 1.

      Though we offer a cursive copybook in SC 2, this is for students with previous cursive experience. We do offer Cursive Practice Sheets, so you would not need to make your own.

      Based on everything you shared, for now I would do this:

      This Year -- NAC 1 PLUS either 1) Cursive Practice Sheets or 2) Copybook Two Cursive to accelerate his progress.
      Add both practice pieces simultaneously to NAC 1 ONLY if you know the combination will not overtire his hand or result in practiced sloppiness.
      And yes, the SC plans for NAC 1 are far more than mere scheduling. He will write to music, write with multi-modal impressions, and more.

      Next Summer -- Consider whichever you did not choose (Cursive Practice Sheets or Copybook Two Cursive) to keep his writing strong.

      Next Year -- Consider NAC 2, which will presume mastery of all letters and the readiness to join them fluently in closely spaced words within sentences. At this point, he can begin the Beginner My Thankfulness Journal which continues with tracing but also allows him to form his own words. At this point he may begin writing his assignments in cursive if ready.
      Thanks Cheryl! I forgot that he completed NAC 1 and had started on the cursive practice sheets (the first book). It was probably 2 or so years ago. At first it was encouraging because he was able to learn to make the individual letters pretty easily. But, when he was unable to join the letters, I switched to manuscript. He can still write the individual letters in cursive without difficulty (if he can trace, which is the same with manuscript). So, I'm pretty sure NAC 1 would be review.

      I need to make my own sheets with StartWrite because he needs to be able to trace the letters instead of copy them (cursive or manuscript). He almost certainly has dyspraxia (OT treats him as though he does because there really isn't any question that he has it), so he still needs to trace. All the copybooks and practice sheets move on to copying before he can copy. It also helps him if what he is writing has more meaning (what he is working on) instead of just something he has to write for the sake of writing, but the biggie is that he needs to be able to trace instead of copy. When he was in NAC 1 and the first book of cursive sheets, I had to use a colored pencil to give him something to trace where they wanted the student to copy. The only thing he does not trace is math, and if there was some way we could swing that he would trace.

      Strength is no longer an issue (yay!). His issues are fine motor control and mental stamina.

      Is it possible to use the lesson plans (for the more you describe) but make my own sheets with StartWrite? I can look for the books from when he did them the first time. I'd prefer to make my own sheets based on them so I don't have to use a colored pencil for him to trace where they expect him to copy.

      BTW, on the website in the Special Needs Section under Spelling, Penmanship, and Writing, the only SC Copybook listed is Book 3. To find the other SC Copybooks, I had to do a search.
      Cheryl, mom to:

      ds 24, graduated
      ds 23, graduated
      dd 15, 9th Grade
      dd 12, 6th Grade
      ds 10, 4nd Grade

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Cheryl in CA View Post

        Is it possible to use the lesson plans (for the more you describe) but make my own sheets with StartWrite? I can look for the books from when he did them the first time. I'd prefer to make my own sheets based on them so I don't have to use a colored pencil for him to trace where they expect him to copy.

        BTW, on the website in the Special Needs Section under Spelling, Penmanship, and Writing, the only SC Copybook listed is Book 3. To find the other SC Copybooks, I had to do a search.
        Certainly! Yes. You know what you are doing. Feel free to make tracing sheets to accompany the SC 2 lesson plans for NAC 1. Though NAC 1 will be review, your sheets and the copybook will help him transition to his own writing.

        Thanks for the website tip. We will see how we can make those copybooks easier to find!

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by cherylswope View Post

          Certainly! Yes. You know what you are doing. Feel free to make tracing sheets to accompany the SC 2 lesson plans for NAC 1. Though NAC 1 will be review, your sheets and the copybook will help him transition to his own writing.

          Thanks for the website tip. We will see how we can make those copybooks easier to find!
          Thanks so much, and sorry I left so much out of my initial post! I can't believe I forgot we had done NAC 1 and the practice sheets :-O I'm hopeful things will go well. I printed off the page I posted above mostly so I could see what size font it was using. I put it on his slant board to see if he could trace the first couple of words, and he traced the whole thing. When he kept going, I watched from a distance to see how he did and it took no more effort or time than when he traces manuscript. He also has no difficulty reading cursive.
          Cheryl, mom to:

          ds 24, graduated
          ds 23, graduated
          dd 15, 9th Grade
          dd 12, 6th Grade
          ds 10, 4nd Grade

          Comment


            #6
            Oh, and regarding the website, copybooks 1 and 2 need to be added to the graded sections. For some reason, SC Copybook 3 is the only one listed.
            Cheryl, mom to:

            ds 24, graduated
            ds 23, graduated
            dd 15, 9th Grade
            dd 12, 6th Grade
            ds 10, 4nd Grade

            Comment


              #7
              I found his NAC 1 and Cursive Pages. He needs a smaller font than NAC 1 uses, so I'd need to change the font size even if he could copy instead of trace. It is nice to see the difference!! His writing was so light, and he basically fell apart when he had to do this page before (legibility wasn't great, but it went way down when he had to try to write this many word and words this long).
              Attached Files
              Cheryl, mom to:

              ds 24, graduated
              ds 23, graduated
              dd 15, 9th Grade
              dd 12, 6th Grade
              ds 10, 4nd Grade

              Comment


                #8
                How gratifying! I love keeping portfolios just for this purpose: We often forget how far we have come.

                Comment

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