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Incorporating Therapy and Outside Play into Your School Day

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    Incorporating Therapy and Outside Play into Your School Day

    As I start to map out our plans for the fall, I'm starting to panic justalittle.

    I'll have five students in our homeschool this fall, which is a big change for us already. In addition to that, one of my sons has some articulation issues and needs consistent speech therapy practice. His older brothers are going to need a sensory diet along with working on primative/retained reflexes. Lastly, I've learned that getting outside helps ALL of our demeanors.

    So, the advice I need from you all? How do you build this into an already busy school day? I'd love to hear how you make it work.
    Plans for 2019-20

    DD1 - 24 - College Grad and rocking her own bakery business
    DD2 - 13 - 8A Louisville HLS Cottage School and MPOA
    DS3 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
    DS4 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
    DD5 - 7 - MP2, Louisville HLS Cottage School
    DS6 - 5 - MP K

    [url]www.thekennedyadventures.com/all-about-our-memoria-press-homeschool[/url]

    #2
    Scheduling outside therapies for us generally takes priority because the therapist’s availability is limited and sometimes we have been on waitlists. I know what I absolutely cannot do, ask the scheduler for what is available and pick the best from my choices. I try to avoid mornings, especially Mondays because it allows me to get some schooling done. I’ve not been successful with much waiting room schooling but I have made use of the car time. Flash cards, audiobooks and recitation are fairly easy in the car. When we have had intensive therapy seasons, I aim for the essentials. I hope this helps and good luck this fall!
    Heidi

    2018-19
    dd- 3m
    ds- SC 1
    dd- SC B

    Comment


      #3
      In my hurry, I may have not been clear about what I trying to accomplish.

      My Daniel is in speech therapy once a week now. The schedule for outside therapy we have works well for us. What I'm struggling with is incorporating the daily work into our days. We're not making a lot of discernable progress, and I feel like it's likely due to the fact that we aren't consistent with practice at home. 😳

      At the moment, I'm not planning on scheduling my twins for OT outside of our home. We're going to work on retained reflex work and some sensory work (primarily proprioceptive) at home, not at the therapy office.

      The daily work is the thing I'm having trouble wrapping my brain around. How to fit it into a day that's already full of schoolwork , lots of children , and running a home. 🤯

      Plans for 2019-20

      DD1 - 24 - College Grad and rocking her own bakery business
      DD2 - 13 - 8A Louisville HLS Cottage School and MPOA
      DS3 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
      DS4 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
      DD5 - 7 - MP2, Louisville HLS Cottage School
      DS6 - 5 - MP K

      [url]www.thekennedyadventures.com/all-about-our-memoria-press-homeschool[/url]

      Comment


        #4
        Good morning, Dianna.

        Often we began the day with the speech therapy exercises immediately after our Bible readings. That was the most effective for us. When placed within the Opening when everyone was reasonably fresh, speech therapy exercises required only 10 minutes or so each day. As you know, short & daily is better than long-but-rarely.

        Sometimes we incorporated physical exercises (e.g., PT/OT) into our lessons, such as using the balance board during Latin recitations. Other times I held physical exercises until late afternoon, when everyone needed to stop mental work and take a physical break. At that time we accomplished the exercises and then took a soccer ball or jump rope outside for the remainder of the intentional exercise portion. Then we were all free. Keeping it short and scheduled worked well for us. I did not enjoy doing those prescribed physical exercises, so if I placed them immediately before a good break for myself, I seemed to be more motivated to accomplish them.

        Comment


          #5
          Ugh, no help here. We had to drop speech therapy because our copays skyrocketed. I find that a lot of the work on articulation was practiced during Recitation and reciting Bible memory verses and poems. My son used to like to be videotaped on my phone to see the progress he has made on certain Bible verses since the beginning of the year. He likes seeing how much better he has gotten through practice.

          As for the physical component, I was also bad at OT-related homework. You should try to reward yourself somehow for getting it done. I saved a lot of it in the younger years for when my husband came home. He loved the idea of stepping up to help my son, so he worked on eye-hand coordination by tossing a squishy softball at my son to bat. They kicked around a soccer ball. One of my favorite things to do in good weather is have the kids take a bike ride for their 10am break. My 5yo was practicing biking without training wheels while my 8yo answered Latin questions as she drove past me. We would run/bike over to the court so they could circle around me and hear me. Sometimes my son and I would throw ultrasoft bouncy balls at my eldest while she tried to dodge our throws on her bike. It was great OT for my son to judge where the ball would need to be trying to hit a moving target. Plus, we laughed hysterically. Another thing you can do is eat early and then take the kids out bike riding while you run next to them. I would call out, "the 23rd Psalm!" Then my little guy would say verses 1-3 for his recitation while biking. It never took more than 12 minutes to go a mile and a half around the neighborhood. When we got back inside, they were ready to sit down and work again. It's harder in the winter months that are windy, icy or wet. Sometimes we'd pull all of the cars out of the garage, set up a space heater, and turn the garage floor into a chalk art pad or obstacle course. There are lots of great crossing the midline floor activities (floor puzzles, large chalk art pictures). We did driveway math on sunny days. I would turn the entire driveway into a math drill with mixed addition/subtraction facts. We also did spelling word practice with chalk.
          Mama to 2, Married 17 years

          SY 19/20
          DD 8-3A
          DS 5-SC C

          Comment


            #6
            Dianna,

            So this has been a huge challenge for me for years. My son needs a LOT of therapy (speech, neurodevelopment, primitive reflex, OT, PT, cognitive skills, etc.) Every time I get really serious about the therapies (which I have had to become trained to do b/c of not having any insurance coverage for them) then academic time suffers. Whenever I get back super serious about academics, the therapy suffers.

            Picking the super important therapy (perhaps 1 or 2) and scheduling it (like Cheryl mentioned) appears to help. Squeezing it in between subjects, or attaching it to a longer 'recess' break. Here's an example of the type of approach I'm trying to suggest: My son appears to have benefitted from interactive metronome work, and especially done a few times a week. (In addition to all the other things I mentioned above! LOL!) So I realized if I just 'attached' it to our regular piano practice time then I'd be more consistent. We go into the living room on the big rug, pull out the metronome, and do approx. 15-20 minutes of interactive metronome, and then move right into piano practice. Sometimes I'll even throw a little extra in there, as well, while we'e on the big rug.... cross-marching (for crossing the midline), balance work, etc.

            Another thing I've had to do is enlist the help of my husband. So years ago he embraced the 15-20 minutes of primitive reflex exercises and he either does them with my son before my husband goes to work, or as soon as he gets home. So he's become part therapist/part PE coach. Many days, he 'attaches' the primitive reflex exercises onto the PE time he does with my son.

            With speech therapy, perhaps you could figure out your 'chunk' of time devoted to language each day, and it just becomes part of your Latin/Reading/Spelling/Writing time.

            I'm definitely no master on how to make this work and hope to glean new ideas myself for how to do this better and more efficiently. I know that, for us, next school year will need to be greatly modified in order to prioritize what's most important. So while I'm looking at doing Greek Myths/Astronomy/Christian Studies 1 at a 1-year pace ,I have to be okay with Greek Myths and Astronomy done to the best of our ability and mostly orally (and for exposure) .....and then prioritize the Christian Studies as a top priority for actual written work in a student workbook.

            I also do a lot of memory work in the car. And because we live a bit out and away from church and other things we do, I try to take advantage of time in the car for things that don't require sitting at a desk.

            I will write more if I think of other things and hope we can all continue to brainstorm with each other on strategies, best practices, etc.

            Susan P in VA


            Comment


              #7
              Diana,

              Susan’s post made me think of something I found helpful. Honestly, OT and PT homework always seems difficult to me. My son’s first OT really encouraged me to keep my husband doing their evening ‘rumble’ time. Even now they ‘rumble’ most evenings and it’s just so natural and easy for them. That’s how they connect. Some nights my husband has just picked J up and thrown him on our big bed. Then they do that again and again. Apparently this is really fun (great cause it’s not my thing!), and Js OT thought it was fantastic.

              All this to say, do enlist your husband to help where you can if this is the kind of thing that comes more easily to him!
              Sarah

              Aussies from Sydney, Australia
              Miriam 9yo Latina Christiana, R&S4, IEW Phonetic Zoo, IEW Grammar
              Jonny 7yo (Special Needs) SC1 Phonics, R&S1
              Elissa (almost) 4yo K phonics, R&S Preschool books

              Together this term (in Circle Time) we are doing Bible time with SC1 Story Bible and our own memorisation/songs, Myself and Others 2, Homer Price, Greek Myths, IEW Poetry Memorisation, speech therapy, The Body Book, Artventure and picture books from SCB/SC1 etc.

              Thomas 17 months

              Comment


                #8
                Just wanted to pop in and say

                THANK YOU.

                I'm sorry I dropped this post and ran, but we have had a BUSY few weeks. (Just got through with serving a tour of duty as Camp Nurse)

                I'll read through responses and notes but just know that I appreciate all of you, so much.


                SPearson ----- You're coming to Sodalitas, right?
                Plans for 2019-20

                DD1 - 24 - College Grad and rocking her own bakery business
                DD2 - 13 - 8A Louisville HLS Cottage School and MPOA
                DS3 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
                DS4 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
                DD5 - 7 - MP2, Louisville HLS Cottage School
                DS6 - 5 - MP K

                [url]www.thekennedyadventures.com/all-about-our-memoria-press-homeschool[/url]

                Comment


                  #9
                  Yes, Dianna! I'll be at Mimi's on Sunday night after a long drive from VA.....excited to see you!

                  Susan

                  Comment

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