Announcement

Collapse

Disclaimer - Read This First

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

The educational and medical information on this website is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Cheryl Swope, M.Ed. and Memoria Press make no representations or warranties in relation to the information on this website.

You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or individualized advice from any other professional healthcare or educational provider. If you think you or your child may be suffering from any medical condition you should seek immediate medical attention.

You should never delay seeking medical or educational advice, disregard medical or educational advice, or discontinue medical or educational treatment because of any information on this website.
See more
See less

MP 2 & 3 vs. SC Level 4 Phonics and Reading

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    MP 2 & 3 vs. SC Level 4 Phonics and Reading

    This school year, my sweet 8 year old girl (2nd grade) worked through all of MP 1 Phonics and Reading and some of MP 2 reading. We finished up the year at the end of Animal Folk Tales. She also completed TS I with great success.

    I'm considering ordering SC Level 4 for her 3rd grade year. I feel like reading still hasn't really "clicked" with her. She still finds reading fairly hard and somewhat exhausting. She will sit and look at picture books (think the Little House early reader books), but doesn't often try to read them alone.

    My current plan for next school year: finish MP 2 starting with The Courage of Sarah Noble, and then move onto MP 3 at whatever pace she can steadily move along. While I don't push her, we do work on reading very consistently. We just move on to the next lesson/book as we complete the current one.

    Just as reference, I also have scheduled to do Mammals, Finish Cursive 2 and move onto 3, R&S Math 3 (she has no issues with math at all), Prima Latina, and CS II (we do this as our Bible time altogether).

    I'm debating between R&S English grade 2 or 3 for her. I think Grade 3 is going to be too hard, possibly. I also have Intro to Composition ready to roll. Lastly, I'm considering doing SC Enrichment 3 with the US History focus.

    In terms of big picture, I'd love for her to be able to 4NU during her 4th grade year. I'm not sure this is realistic based on where she is currently with reading.

    My question: Does SC Level 4 Phonics & Reading offer strategies other than what's presented in the "regular" MP curriculum, or does it help just with pacing?

    I feel like she might benefit from some bits and pieces of an SC curriculum, but I'm not exactly sure what might be the best fit for her.

    She's never had a formal evaluation for her reading difficulties. She does, however, have Woodcock-Johnson testing scheduled for June 20. I am eager to hear those results!

    Thank you for any guidance you can offer in choosing the best route for her.

    Lauren
    We're new to MP this year! :)
    Mama to 5 Sweet Ones:
    8th grade DS: HSed through 6th grade; at a University-Model School this year
    6th grade DD: Mix of 5M/6M Core and MPOA FFL
    4th grade DD: Mostly 4NU Core
    2nd Grade DD: MP 1st Grade Core & math from 2nd
    22-month old Pudding Pie

    #2
    After Level 2, there is less movement/hands-on as the kids are then fairly solid in their reading. Have you checked the placement assessments for SC? I would start there first. Many moms have been surprised recently to find that their children needed a different level than they originally thought: https://www.memoriapress.com/curricu...l-needs-about/

    You mentioned that she’s exhausted after reading...have you been able to rule out any vision issues (these are the ones that a normal eye exam will NOT catch: struggling to hold convergence, field of vision, tracking stamina, etc). Any of those will make reading exhausting.

    Let us know what the assessments show!
    Jennifer
    Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

    2019-2020 Plans:

    DS16
    MP10 Lit, MP-Holt Biology, Light to the Nations II, Spanish
    MPOA: Algebra I, High School Comp II

    DS15
    As above, plus:
    MP Greek Tragedies; no Spanish
    MPOA: Fourth Form Latin

    DS12: 7M subbing Sea to Shining Sea for American history

    DS11: Simply Classical Level 4

    DD9: 3A, with First Form Latin (long story!)

    DD7/8: Simply Classical Level 3

    DD 4/5: Simply Classical Level C (NT using SC for two-year PreK due to January birthday)

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks, Jennifer, for your ideas! I did do the placement test, and she scored around 90% for Level 4.

      Our pediatrician mentioned about convergence, etc causing her to be tired with reading. I DO feel like her stamina has increased by leaps and bounds from starting Little Bear last July! So that's a huge plus. She has an annual eye exam in July, so I'll mention this then. Our optician also has a Vision Therapy office attached.
      We're new to MP this year! :)
      Mama to 5 Sweet Ones:
      8th grade DS: HSed through 6th grade; at a University-Model School this year
      6th grade DD: Mix of 5M/6M Core and MPOA FFL
      4th grade DD: Mostly 4NU Core
      2nd Grade DD: MP 1st Grade Core & math from 2nd
      22-month old Pudding Pie

      Comment


        #4
        Good morning!

        Rather than attempt a blend of SC 4 and MP, I would spend time over the summer specifically on shoring up her phonics and reading.

        You might use the materials you have, such as Classical Phonics word lists, phonogram cards, and readers.

        Keys to remember:
        1. Do not push to fatigue. Stop when she is nearing the end of her stamina level but still successful.
        2. Create short oral reading lessons to be accomplished twice daily.
        Phonics Review -- The first lesson of the day includes 10-20 minutes of phonics review followed by brief oral reading.
        Oral Reading Practice -- The second lesson of the day could be 10-20 minutes of oral reading of a new book you read together.
        3. Note her baseline stamina. See if you can increase by just a few minutes each day.



        "Reading through the lines" of your post, it seems that as a mother your heart's desire is to see her reading books for pleasure outside of your lessons. If she truly has vision difficulties, this might be unrealistic at the moment. I would see if you can bump the vision appointment to an earlier date. If not, here is a tip for this: Consider conducting a brief interview with her. Lay out all of the novels you have read together. Ask her to name 2 favorite authors from that collection. Head to the library or, noting the number of children you have homeschooled, your own bookshelves! Find other books by those authors and read to her. If you have an older child who reads with inflection and fluency, you might give that child a summer job of oral reading. I would not insist that your 8yo follow along visually until you learn more about what might be going on with her eyes. Of course you can always opt for audio books, but reading aloud together is so much more of a shared experience. If you're trying to foster enjoyment of reading, shared read-alouds might be worth adding to your summer agenda prescribed above.

        If you want new materials for working on reading, see some of the options in SC 1, 2, and 3:
        https://www.memoriapress.com/curricu...onics-reading/

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
          Good morning!

          Rather than attempt a blend of SC 4 and MP, I would spend time over the summer specifically on shoring up her phonics and reading.

          You might use the materials you have, such as Classical Phonics word lists, phonogram cards, and readers.

          Keys to remember:
          1. Do not push to fatigue. Stop when she is nearing the end of her stamina level but still successful.
          2. Create short oral reading lessons to be accomplished twice daily.
          Phonics Review -- The first lesson of the day includes 10-20 minutes of phonics review followed by brief oral reading.
          Oral Reading Practice -- The second lesson of the day could be 10-20 minutes of oral reading of a new book you read together.
          3. Note her baseline stamina. See if you can increase by just a few minutes each day.



          "Reading through the lines" of your post, it seems that as a mother your heart's desire is to see her reading books for pleasure outside of your lessons. If she truly has vision difficulties, this might be unrealistic at the moment. I would see if you can bump the vision appointment to an earlier date. If not, here is a tip for this: Consider conducting a brief interview with her. Lay out all of the novels you have read together. Ask her to name 2 favorite authors from that collection. Head to the library or, noting the number of children you have homeschooled, your own bookshelves! Find other books by those authors and read to her. If you have an older child who reads with inflection and fluency, you might give that child a summer job of oral reading. I would not insist that your 8yo follow along visually until you learn more about what might be going on with her eyes. Of course you can always opt for audio books, but reading aloud together is so much more of a shared experience. If you're trying to foster enjoyment of reading, shared read-alouds might be worth adding to your summer agenda prescribed above.

          If you want new materials for working on reading, see some of the options in SC 1, 2, and 3:
          https://www.memoriapress.com/curricu...onics-reading/
          Cheryl, I can't thank you enough for taking the time to address my concerns. I love your ideas to shore up her phonics and reading through the summer. While this is what I wanted to do, I wasn't totally sure what the approach should be. I appreciate your practical ideas for daily review and reading.

          And your comment about shopping my own homeschool shelves made me laugh! Yes, we do have a mini library, which we all love and use faithfully! You are right in that I would really like for my 8 year old to enjoy this little library as well.

          ---------------------------------------------------

          A few more questions if anyone is available to answer:

          -- Would the SC 3 manual offer more ideas for phonics lessons that are oral?
          -- I see the extended lit options for SC 2 and 4. Is there an extended lit option for 3? I can't seem to find one.

          And this is totally unrelated to the aforementioned reading/phonics issues:
          - I would like to do the American History enrichment of SC 3 during this same child's 3rd grade year. In addition to the SC 3 Enrichment Guide, what else will I need to purchase? We already have 3/4 of those books on our shelves, and I'm looking forward to reading through them again this coming year. We also have the MP 1 Art Cards and Posters. I can't tell what else I need to order just for the Enrichment.

          Thank you, All!
          Lauren

          We're new to MP this year! :)
          Mama to 5 Sweet Ones:
          8th grade DS: HSed through 6th grade; at a University-Model School this year
          6th grade DD: Mix of 5M/6M Core and MPOA FFL
          4th grade DD: Mostly 4NU Core
          2nd Grade DD: MP 1st Grade Core & math from 2nd
          22-month old Pudding Pie

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by MamaHill View Post

            Cheryl, I can't thank you enough for taking the time to address my concerns. I love your ideas to shore up her phonics and reading through the summer. While this is what I wanted to do, I wasn't totally sure what the approach should be. I appreciate your practical ideas for daily review and reading.

            And your comment about shopping my own homeschool shelves made me laugh! Yes, we do have a mini library, which we all love and use faithfully! You are right in that I would really like for my 8 year old to enjoy this little library as well.

            ---------------------------------------------------

            A few more questions if anyone is available to answer:

            -- Would the SC 3 manual offer more ideas for phonics lessons that are oral?
            -- I see the extended lit options for SC 2 and 4. Is there an extended lit option for 3? I can't seem to find one.

            And this is totally unrelated to the aforementioned reading/phonics issues:
            - I would like to do the American History enrichment of SC 3 during this same child's 3rd grade year. In addition to the SC 3 Enrichment Guide, what else will I need to purchase? We already have 3/4 of those books on our shelves, and I'm looking forward to reading through them again this coming year. We also have the MP 1 Art Cards and Posters. I can't tell what else I need to order just for the Enrichment.

            Thank you, All!
            Lauren
            Answers in red below each question ...
            A few more questions if anyone is available to answer:
            -- Would the SC 3 manual offer more ideas for phonics lessons that are oral?
            Yes. In SC 3 Weeks 1-8 we teach with Classical Phonics, Phonics Flashcards, and FSR E and daily tips for teaching (or reviewing) these orally and in other ways. From Weeks 9-19 we teach from SC More Storytime Treasures which includes added phonics work for each lesson. In Weeks 20-34 students read Wagon Wheels & Prairie School.
            -- I see the extended lit options for SC 2 and 4. Is there an extended lit option for 3? I can't seem to find one.
            We give quite a bit of reading practice in SC 3. Strong readers can use the American history readers as extended literature.

            Others can use SC 2 extended lit selections and numerous books by the same authors in that set.

            Another option: the new Easy Reader Classics set from Memoria Press
            And this is totally unrelated to the aforementioned reading/phonics issues:
            - I would like to do the American History enrichment of SC 3 during this same child's 3rd grade year. In addition to the SC 3 Enrichment Guide, what else will I need to purchase? We already have 3/4 of those books on our shelves, and I'm looking forward to reading through them again this coming year. We also have the MP 1 Art Cards and Posters. I can't tell what else I need to order just for the Enrichment
            Go to the SC 3 section within the enrichment module:

            https://www.memoriapress.com/curricu...al-enrichment/

            You can order any of the American history books missing from your collection.

            You will also see an entire coordinating Science set of books. Order these or find them elsewhere to use these week by week.

            In SC 3 we also use MP K and MP 2 Art Cards and Posters, so you will find those there as well. (If you want to use only MP 1 Art Cards or Posters, this is fine.)

            I recommend the SC 3 Curriculum Manual, as this will give you an overview of all SC 3 Enrichment components each week: Music, Art, American History, and Science, Knowledge, & Culture.

            Comment


              #7
              If one of your main goals is to get her to enjoy reading, you might consider two reading sessions -- one with literature for school and another (even just 5-10 minutes at bedtime) with easier books that you are certain she can read pretty easily -- like easy reader books. This could boost her confidence and make her want to explore reading a bit more on her own. I've often underestimated the benefit of starting small. Little by little it adds up.
              Susan

              2018-2019
              A (10) - Barton, R&S math 3, SC 3
              C (9) - Barton, R&S math 2, SC 3
              G (5) - Simply Classical C

              Comment

              Working...
              X