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Where to place dd?

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    Where to place dd?

    I’m trying to decide what course of action to take with my 6-year-old. I’m hesitant to even label her as “special needs” because I don’t know that is even the case. She excels at math, I wouldn’t say she has any issues with fine motor skills or anything except reading. We have worked our way through Logic of English Foundations A this year and she finally has a grip on the sound of each letter (short vowel sounds, at least). She can say the sound of each letter in a CVC or CCVC word but when it comes to blending it together she just doesn’t get it. So if she sees “box”, she can say /b/ /o/ /ks/ but then guesses “bot”! Sometimes it’s the last sound she guesses, sometimes the middle. I have taught two older kids to read and they seemed to pick it up easier, but I just feel stuck with this one! Looking at the SC placement tests, I would probably say she needs to start at Level 1 (didn’t actually give her the “test” yet) but I hate to start what technically looks like Kindergarten all over again.

    #2
    Good morning. A few thoughts:

    1. She is otherwise bright and doing well. Can you think of any factors that might indicate or predispose her to being at risk for learning disabilities (e.g., difficult birth, early speech/language difficulties, a parent or extended family member(s) with learning disabilities)?

    2. You mention two other children who learned to read with relative ease. This is your "control group." As you suspect, this child may be more challenging to teach, but you are catching this early. You might consider formal testing to determine what, if anything, is hindering her progress.

    3. Even if you begin at the beginning of Simply Classical Level 1, you do not need to feel as if you are starting over! We pack many riches into SC 1 to keep a child delighted and challenged. This includes art studies, history, music, and culture. After 7 weeks or so, you may find that you can accelerate the pace.

    4. You can customize math upward to match her stronger math abilities.

    5. Plan on teaching not only from SC 1 but also SC 2. She will likely need intensive and explicit support in learning to read well. SC 1 & 2 will give this to her. After these levels, she may be able to transition to MP or you may want her to proceed to SC 3 in which she studies American history all year while working on reading, phonics, spelling, and writing. In every level we include more advanced studies so she need never feel "behind."

    6. Do not feel as if SC 1 is kindergarten, but rather the level in which she begins to read! This is an enormous accomplishment for any child at any age and, if we can help make this happen, we will be thrilled. The books are not marked by "grade," and her siblings did not use these resources, so there is no need to worry about how it will look or feel to her. The key is masking your own frustration and replacing it with eagerness to watch her embark on reading.

    7. You mentioned her not quite knowing sounds/letters, so we do want to be sure we are not placing the cart before the horse. She might benefit from an accelerated C in only phonics & reading as a quick prereading precursor to SC 1. If you have time, take the placement assessments for SC C, SC 1, and SC 2. We want her to be perfectly placed and can customize to make this happen. ClassicalSpecialNeeds.com, Where Do I Start? Let us know the scores and we can craft a streamlined plan for your daughter.

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks so much for your response! I had a chance to actually sit down and go through the placement assessments and I definitely think SC 1 is the perfect fit. Just looking at the first few questions on Level 2 I could easily say, no that would be too hard, and looking at SC C it would be easy. I only put her in "emerging" on 2 categories (those under the hearing/ auditory processing category) on SC1 and the rest would be "yes".

      She has had some hearing issues, and concurrently speech issues, although minor. She had tubes in her ears several years ago, and I think prior to that she wasn't hearing things half as well as we thought she was. Next week she is actually scheduled to have her tonsils & adenoids removed, as she still occasionally fails hearing tests. I do feel some of her learning abilities stem from a lack of good quality sleep, which is a result of allergies/ enlarged tonsils/ etc., which will soon hopefully be a problem that will be eliminated. I have wondered on occasion about dyslexia, but I really do want to see how things start to go after the tonsils are out and she hopefully gets better sleep. I also think she just is the type of kid that has an extremely low frustration tolerance and if she *thinks* she can't read, she gives up easily and doesn't want to try. I have mentioned my concern about dyslexia to her pediatrician, and she seems to think she's a little young to consider that yet, and also doesn't know how we would go about getting her tested as we are not in the public school system. I have put that aside at least for now.

      You have encouraged me to focus on her needs regardless of "grade level" and concentrate mainly on what it will take to get her reading well. Thankfully, she has no idea where she fits in with her peers and doesn't feel as if everyone else is doing something she's not, and she doesn't feel that early reading materials are too babyish. So I will keep pressing on with what she needs no matter where I think she is "supposed" to fit.






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        #4
        It sounds like SC1 is going to be a great fit.

        My kids were in private school when we sought psychoeducational testing for my eldest at the nearest university. She was an early reader, highly gifted in the arts with excellent visual-spacial abilities. Her problem was reversals in writing and floating/transposed letters between lines (but not within words). I bought all the books and was sure it was what she had. The testing revealed she didn't have dyslexia. Reading just takes longer for some kids, especially when they have executive functioning issues. My child's eyes were all over the page, yet her eyesight was very good (we also had my son's eye surgeon work her up and got an audiogram from ENT). She relied on the pictures to use context to predict the words bu looking at the first and last letters of each word. Apparently this is also pretty normal in a mixed look-see method of teaching reading. We used white paper to block out pictures so her eyes could track left to right decoding through phonics alone. Anyway, call your local university with a child Psychology department and see if they offer psychoeducational testing (like WISC, Woodcock-Johnson, BASC3, auditory processing tests, basic academic achievement, etc). We saved hundreds of dollars this way. It was really helpful to know that MP was perfect at addressing our eldest's needs with a systematic, mastery-based approach to learning. And my son, who has far more issues is thriving with SC. We will use this the whole way up for him because his challenges are perfectly addressed by SC's methodical approach to overteaching and explicit teaching of concepts other gain more naturally.
        Mama to 2

        Summer:
        MPK with SC1 Phonics & Math
        SY 20/21
        4A

        Comment


          #5
          You might also look into seeing a developmental optometrist to test for visual tracking issues. This is not the same as the eye test your usual eye/glasses doctor gives. These doctors test for convergence issues or tracking issues, and such. I have no experience with this area but it is worth a look.
          The Homeschool Grads:
          J- 6/96
          S- 11/98

          Still Homeschooling:
          G- 4/04
          D- 5/05
          F- 7/08 (my only girl)

          Future Homeschooler:
          M- 9/16

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by sabrina_cody View Post
            Thanks so much for your response! I had a chance to actually sit down and go through the placement assessments and I definitely think SC 1 is the perfect fit. Just looking at the first few questions on Level 2 I could easily say, no that would be too hard, and looking at SC C it would be easy. I only put her in "emerging" on 2 categories (those under the hearing/ auditory processing category) on SC1 and the rest would be "yes".

            She has had some hearing issues, and concurrently speech issues, although minor. She had tubes in her ears several years ago, and I think prior to that she wasn't hearing things half as well as we thought she was. Next week she is actually scheduled to have her tonsils & adenoids removed, as she still occasionally fails hearing tests. I do feel some of her learning abilities stem from a lack of good quality sleep, which is a result of allergies/ enlarged tonsils/ etc., which will soon hopefully be a problem that will be eliminated. I have wondered on occasion about dyslexia, but I really do want to see how things start to go after the tonsils are out and she hopefully gets better sleep. I also think she just is the type of kid that has an extremely low frustration tolerance and if she *thinks* she can't read, she gives up easily and doesn't want to try. I have mentioned my concern about dyslexia to her pediatrician, and she seems to think she's a little young to consider that yet, and also doesn't know how we would go about getting her tested as we are not in the public school system. I have put that aside at least for now.

            You have encouraged me to focus on her needs regardless of "grade level" and concentrate mainly on what it will take to get her reading well. Thankfully, she has no idea where she fits in with her peers and doesn't feel as if everyone else is doing something she's not, and she doesn't feel that early reading materials are too babyish. So I will keep pressing on with what she needs no matter where I think she is "supposed" to fit.





            Yes, just echoing the others that testing can occur, even this young and even outside the public school, if you are interested. You might search in your area for centers specializing in learning disabilities such as dyslexia, university diagnostic clinics, or see what your insurance might cover. You can request a full neuropsychological assessment or simply an initial dyslexia screening. All of the factors you mentioned may still be contributing factors, but it can be helpful to identify anything more that might be underlying her learning difficulties.

            For now, yes, SC 1 will serve her well. Be sure to use all of the multisensory tools in the lesson plans, even if they do not seem necessary. They can help by lifting the letters from 2D to 3D in her eyes and in her mind, as she begins to "crack the code" of reading. From SC 1, SC 2 will reinforce everything you teach now and work also on reading fluency. We look forward to hearing about her progress!

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