Announcement

Collapse

Disclaimer - Read This First

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

The educational and medical information on this website is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Cheryl Swope, M.Ed. and Memoria Press make no representations or warranties in relation to the information on this website.

You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or individualized advice from any other professional healthcare or educational provider. If you think you or your child may be suffering from any medical condition you should seek immediate medical attention.

You should never delay seeking medical or educational advice, disregard medical or educational advice, or discontinue medical or educational treatment because of any information on this website.
See more
See less

Questions about parenting a delayed child

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Questions about parenting a delayed child

    This isn't specific to SC, but I hoped the other moms on here might have some useful input. We are fostering four children with the plan to adopt them. They came into foster care almost a year and a half ago, and joined our family about two months ago. There is a set of 3-year-old twins, and the boy is more delayed than the girl. Overall he seems to function at more of an 18-month-old level. A while ago, he was getting into mischief and to keep him out of trouble for a few minutes, I set him down in the playpen I had in the living room for my one-year-old. I was expecting him to get upset at being confined, but he immediately settled down happily to play with the toys in the playpen. Since then he has asked several times to sit in the playpen. Part of me is uncomfortable letting him play in it, because I feel like it's unnatural for a 3-year-old to do that, but on the other hand he's so content in there, I wonder if maybe it's okay to do it because it feels safe/secure for him. Has anyone else dealt with this sort of thing?
    Mom to 11:
    Biological - ages 7, 6, 3, 1
    Adopted - ages 8, 7, 5
    Fostering to adopt - ages 6, 5, 3, 3

    #2
    It reminds me of those pop up tents, or those kid kraft little houses. With a big family, maybe he likes the "enclosed" feel of it. When I set up this free-standing play area for my 1 year old, for some weird reason, all three boys wanted to hang out in it. And they were 4,5, and 6! Remember blanket forts? My kids still love those. It could also be that he may have been kept in one a long time and it is soothing. He's 3, so he may know how to get out when he wants to, and if he can, it's not really confinement...more like a barrier. You have a big family and maybe there's some comfort to having his own "space", even if just for a little while. I think they even make a pop up tent that can go over a bed if that would make you more comfortable about it. If he is in a bunkbed on the bottom, you might even hang blankets from underneath the top bunk to give him a sort of blanket fort of his own.
    Melissa

    DS (MP2) - 8
    DS (MP1) - 7
    DS (K) - 5
    DD (Adorable distraction) 2

    Comment


      #3
      Yes. A playpen is fine, especially when a child is overstimulated. The challenge with some kids is to get them to break out of their shell and get some 1) alone time with you or a primary caregiver on a lap or in arms-this is where language is learned and relationships and trust are formed, and 2) planned engagement with his household siblings where you are there to help him navigate sharing, turn-taking, and pretend play. My son has other issues running in the background that increase his desire to play alone and in tight spaces, but it has been the hip and lap time that has really coaxed him out of his shell verbally, socially and academically. I really like to bring my little guy over with me to help me cook dinner. There are so many things you can narrate and describe that provide a quieter, one-on-one, language-rich environment.
      Mama to 2, Married 17 years

      SY 19/20
      DD 8-3A
      DS 5-SC C

      Comment

      Working...
      X