Announcement

Collapse

Disclaimer - Read This First

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

The educational and medical information on this website is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Cheryl Swope, M.Ed. and Memoria Press make no representations or warranties in relation to the information on this website.

You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or individualized advice from any other professional healthcare or educational provider. If you think you or your child may be suffering from any medical condition you should seek immediate medical attention.

You should never delay seeking medical or educational advice, disregard medical or educational advice, or discontinue medical or educational treatment because of any information on this website.
See more
See less

Where to go from here?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Where to go from here?

    Hello All,

    I am not really sure where to start, but I will try to give you a quick run down of our current situation.

    We are brand new to MP - just started in January of this year. We had been doing a more eclectic approach with a Charlotte Mason twist, but through several different circumstances, I felt led by the Lord to move my youngest 2 children to Memoria Press, at least for Classical Studies, Christian Studies, Latin, and Science. We are finishing up week 5, and I am seeing progress and improvement in both of my children.

    My concern is for my 14 year old son who is in 8th grade. He and his younger sister, 11, are doing much of the content from Core 5. It seems to be a good level for both of them, even though my daughter still works faster and outperforms my son much of the time. He is starting to push himself a bit more, as he sees her working, remembering and testing better than him. Last week, all of his quiz grades were better than hers. I don't mean to sound like I am trying to compare them, but the competition has actually been good for him. I had noticed before we started MP that he wasn't trying to learn and didn't think he was capable of learning. That is starting to turn around, and that is a GOOD thing.

    I have never had my 14 yo son formally tested, but his older brother and sister have been tested. His older brother has ADD, ADHD, reading and math disabilities, and his older sister has ADD, as well. I am pretty sure my 14 yo has ADD and some language processing issues. Also, his reading comprehension is very low. He misses SOOO much when he is reading or being read to, even when he is listening and looking at the text at the same time.

    I have been looking at our options for next year: There's a Highlands Latin Cottage School about an hour away, and then there's the online classes with MPOA. I really don't think the Cottage School is the best option right now since we'd have to work through the summer to, hopefully, be ready for Second Form, Chreia/Maxim and Famous Men of Greece by the fall. Rushing through First Form, Fable/Narrative, and FMOR just to be ready to jump into the classes the cottage school has available doesn't feel right to me. I am considering MPOA for composition and/or literature.

    So, my big question is what is the best progression for a kid like my son? I know you all don't know him like I do, but based on what I've shared so far, what do you think of my thoughts below?

    First of all, since my son will technically by a 9th grader next year, should I to try to push him forward into high school level content or let him move through the cores the best that he can and get as far as he can. I can see both of my kids moving smoothly into core 6 next year once we've finished core 5, and then the following year I was thinking of having my son do a combo year of cores 7/8 for 10th grade, then doing years 9 and 10 for his junior and senior years. Does that sound like a viable plan for a kid who struggles with reading, processing and remembering?

    Secondly, we have not started Classical Composition, yet, because I am teaching Language Arts classes to my children and another family's children in my home every week. I am looking at starting Classical Composition this summer, if possible. Due to my son's struggles with self expression, I feel like he needs at least a little bit of Fable and a good bit of Narrative. I really do not want to rush him through these levels. I know they are not "fun", but if these levels can help remediate my son, I am willing to put in the time and effort necessary. I know at his age it is recommended that you skip Fable and do a bit of Narrative, but what about older kids with language receptive/expressive issues? What is a good progression for older students who also have learning struggles?

    I appreciate this forum, and I really appreciate the commitment MP has made to families and children who have to "think outside the box" like we have always had to do. Of course, I wish Simply Classical was there for my kiddos when they were younger, but I am thankful that MP makes the regular cores flexible enough that my 8th grader doesn't feel like he's doing "baby work".

    Thanks for any input or insight you all have to share.

    In His love,
    RuthAnn




    #2
    First, good for you! You are already seeing progress in both of your children. We found such healthy competition beneficial here too. Example: My daughter (with an uncanny memory) outpaced my son (with low processing) on Latin flashcards, so her presence in our drills pushed him to move faster, while his analytical mind translated more readily and nudged her to move more quickly with Latin translations.

    Second, testing: If it would help your planning, you might want to consider this. The family history is enough to warrant exploration. The results might assist your long-term planning and your son's understanding of himself. All of this can be very helpful at age 14/15.

    Third, rushing: Agreed. There will be little benefit to pushing him through content just to match a "grade" number. Your instincts sound spot on.
    - Classical Composition: Fable first -- yes, given his language & learning issues.
    - Homeschooling for tutorial instruction
    - MPOA for peer discussions (and not-mom teachers) -- yes, for only a few, manageable classes. Good call.
    - Long-term progression: MP 5 taught together this year, MP 6 taught together with continued healthy competition/combination next year, then re-evaluate. You might find you can progress with your idea of a MP 7/8 combo, concluding with MP 9 & 10. Yes. This is a strong plan. You will continue to work not only on his amassing content but also on reading well, writing well, and speaking well through these studies.

    You may be new to MP, but you're not new to homeschooling or to learning challenges. And you're not at all new to your son. It sounds like you need little more than permission to proceed with your own hunches. Even at MP 5 and 6, he is receiving a strong foundation because of the depth of content, vocabulary, and instruction.

    Comment


      #3
      RuthAnn,

      Hey amazing mama! Trust those instincts. You've made an amazing plan. Remember that school we were sitting in? They were doing many of those subjects 1-2 years behind, and they weren't accommodating for kids with special needs. They just knew what rigorous subjects the Latin, Language Arts, History and Classical Studies were. He is getting an amazing education, and rightly-paced, he's going to actually know it instead of feeling bewildered and overwhelmed. You're just going to have to come back and tell me the same thing in a few years when I feel the pressure of the world to push ahead.
      Mama to 2, Married 17 years

      SY 19/20
      DD 8-3A
      DS 5-SC C

      Comment


        #4
        Hi RuthAnn!

        Welcome to MP. I have found Classical Composition to be the perfect curriculum for teaching writing to my own son with special needs and difficulty with self-expression. With your son's struggles I would definitely not skip the Fable stage. You can spend a couple months on it and then reassess; you may not need to spend an entire year on Fable. It is very doable because every step is so neatly laid out, and the passages for rewriting are short. Narrative stage has longer passages to rewrite, so it could be overwhelming to start with if he struggles with writing. Many classical programs (even MPOA) offer the Progymnasmata as a high school composition class, so don't worry that the Fable or Narrative stages are not high school level at HLS.

        My son, who is in 9th grade this year, works a grade or two below the MP grade level in most subjects. It is fine. It is a fantastic education. He is doing so much better than he was when I was trying to keep him in a program's grade level and modify everything.

        I'd agree with you about the Cottage School probably being too much. You want to cement his skills now at home and also get clear about the challenges he has before adding in outside classes. We haven't used an MPOA class yet, mainly because I've been worried about spending the money and then finding out that my son would not be able to keep up the pace. I don't know if an individual teacher might modify expectations or not, but on the whole MPOA does not guarantee classes will be modified for special needs. I am considering it again for my son for next year, though, in a subject where he is usually able to keep up the ordinary MP lesson plan pace.

        Catherine

        2018-19
        DS15, 9th
        DS13, 6th
        DS11, 5th
        DD11, 5th
        DS6, K
        DD3
        DS 10 mos

        Homeschooling 3 with MP
        2 using First Form series in school

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
          First, good for you! You are already seeing progress in both of your children. We found such healthy competition beneficial here too. Example: My daughter (with an uncanny memory) outpaced my son (with low processing) on Latin flashcards, so her presence in our drills pushed him to move faster, while his analytical mind translated more readily and nudged her to move more quickly with Latin translations.

          Second, testing: If it would help your planning, you might want to consider this. The family history is enough to warrant exploration. The results might assist your long-term planning and your son's understanding of himself. All of this can be very helpful at age 14/15.

          Third, rushing: Agreed. There will be little benefit to pushing him through content just to match a "grade" number. Your instincts sound spot on.
          - Classical Composition: Fable first -- yes, given his language & learning issues.
          - Homeschooling for tutorial instruction
          - MPOA for peer discussions (and not-mom teachers) -- yes, for only a few, manageable classes. Good call.
          - Long-term progression: MP 5 taught together this year, MP 6 taught together with continued healthy competition/combination next year, then re-evaluate. You might find you can progress with your idea of a MP 7/8 combo, concluding with MP 9 & 10. Yes. This is a strong plan. You will continue to work not only on his amassing content but also on reading well, writing well, and speaking well through these studies.

          You may be new to MP, but you're not new to homeschooling or to learning challenges. And you're not at all new to your son. It sounds like you need little more than permission to proceed with your own hunches. Even at MP 5 and 6, he is receiving a strong foundation because of the depth of content, vocabulary, and instruction.
          Cheryl,

          Thank you so much for taking the time to respond. I appreciate the encouragement and the insight.

          As to the testing, I have started looking into that. We moved this past summer, so the testing center I used for my 2 other children is now much farther away. Thanks, though, for the reminder that this is a good time to get that done.

          Thank you for confirmation of what I was thinking for a long term plan for my son. Sometimes, you just need to hear that you're not crazy.

          I have no problem using lower cores for my son, but as far as assigning HS credit for lower cores, do I just give him the credit that I think he deserves for the content that he studies? That's the harder part for me.

          Thanks, again, for your thoughtful reply.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by enbateau View Post
            RuthAnn,

            Hey amazing mama! Trust those instincts. You've made an amazing plan. Remember that school we were sitting in? They were doing many of those subjects 1-2 years behind, and they weren't accommodating for kids with special needs. They just knew what rigorous subjects the Latin, Language Arts, History and Classical Studies were. He is getting an amazing education, and rightly-paced, he's going to actually know it instead of feeling bewildered and overwhelmed. You're just going to have to come back and tell me the same thing in a few years when I feel the pressure of the world to push ahead.
            Hey Lady!

            Sure wish you were closer so we could encourage each other in person, but I am thankful that you "show up" on this forum.

            I did not realize that they were doing subjects 1-2 years behind at that school. That DOES make me feel better. Overall, it really doesn't bother me too much that my struggling kids are doing lower level work . . . until they hit high school. Then I feel like a failure because I feel like I wasn't able to get them ready for high school level work. I know (in my head) that it's not my fault, but I still have that nagging sense that I should have done more so that they could be completing material that actually is "supposed" to be counted as high school credit. It's a vicious cycle that I hope you can avoid.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by CatherineS View Post
              Hi RuthAnn!

              Welcome to MP. I have found Classical Composition to be the perfect curriculum for teaching writing to my own son with special needs and difficulty with self-expression. With your son's struggles I would definitely not skip the Fable stage. You can spend a couple months on it and then reassess; you may not need to spend an entire year on Fable. It is very doable because every step is so neatly laid out, and the passages for rewriting are short. Narrative stage has longer passages to rewrite, so it could be overwhelming to start with if he struggles with writing. Many classical programs (even MPOA) offer the Progymnasmata as a high school composition class, so don't worry that the Fable or Narrative stages are not high school level at HLS.

              My son, who is in 9th grade this year, works a grade or two below the MP grade level in most subjects. It is fine. It is a fantastic education. He is doing so much better than he was when I was trying to keep him in a program's grade level and modify everything.

              I'd agree with you about the Cottage School probably being too much. You want to cement his skills now at home and also get clear about the challenges he has before adding in outside classes. We haven't used an MPOA class yet, mainly because I've been worried about spending the money and then finding out that my son would not be able to keep up the pace. I don't know if an individual teacher might modify expectations or not, but on the whole MPOA does not guarantee classes will be modified for special needs. I am considering it again for my son for next year, though, in a subject where he is usually able to keep up the ordinary MP lesson plan pace.
              Catherine,

              Thank you so much for chiming in. It's so helpful to hear from other parents who are walking in the same shoes I am. There aren't a lot of people walking in these shoes on this particular path, so it's nice to hear how it's working for someone who is dealing with similar issues.

              Thank you for the recommendation to NOT skip Fable. I know MP has to give recommendations that are applicable to the majority, but then it makes it confusing for those of us with unique situations.

              It was particularly helpful to hear, also, that it has worked better for your son to work a couple of levels lower in MP than to try and modify grade level material for him. I KNOW that, but it's good to be reminded.

              Thank you for mentioning the fact that MPOA is not set up to be able to modify their classes for special needs. I hadn't really thought about that, but that's a good thing to keep in mind. I may need to get through next year with MP at home, and then see what he could handle online the following year.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by RuthAnn View Post
                ...I have no problem using lower cores for my son, but as far as assigning HS credit for lower cores, do I just give him the credit that I think he deserves for the content that he studies? That's the harder part for me.
                You can do this several ways.

                1) Subject Transcript
                If he is college bound, you might want to create a transcript by subject, rather than by grade. Let's say eventually he studies Algebra I and Geometry, but not Trig or Calc. Simply place all of his high-school level math classes under Mathematics.

                High School
                2021-2025

                Mathematics
                Algebra I -- B
                Geometry -- A

                You can do the same with English, Science, Foreign Language (Latin), etc.

                Then anyone can see at a glance which high-school-level courses he studied over his four years.
                For specifics about assigning credits from MP courses, the MP 9-12 board is a good place to ask. I found this in a quick search:
                - Concise History of the American Republic -- book is divided over two years, 1 year of high school credit for each year




                2) Year-by-Year Transcript
                Simply indicate what he learned freshman, sophomore, junior, senior years. If some academics remain at the pre-high-school level his first years,
                you might create "electives" to reflect any passions studied in depth at high-school-equivalent levels.




                3) A Modified Diploma
                Indicate on the diploma that coursework was modified. Then you can list everything he studies on his transcript. This has pro's/con's, especially if he is college-bound, so do your homework there. If you anticipate that he will need supports at the college level, you might include his testing, IEP, accommodations in his records.




                Note: If you indicate anywhere that he studied at a lower level, just be careful not to penalize him too much given the truly higher level of MP coursework contrasted with what passes for high school work elsewhere.

                As always, check the laws where you live. HSLDA has a good list of requirements by state. You might search "Transcript Preparation" there for additional tips.

                Comment

                Working...
                X