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    Spelling

    Despite being in SC3, C (10yo) is on Week 26 of SC Spelling Book One. It’s been slow going, we put it aside for awhile, it gets pushed to the back burner, etc.

    I’ve been trying to stay consistent with it since January but we have definite problems.

    1. He doesn’t like using letter tiles (takes too long) or wikki sticks (too sticky) or clay (feels weird). I know this is impacting his ability to remember the words. I could never find metal letters in lowercase so I wasn’t able to try the leather cord idea.

    2. He also doesn’t seem to hear sounds correctly. I’m attaching the oral test from the back of the book. Since we’re almost through the book, we did the first half of the test so I could gauge if we’re really making progress or not. I wrote down how he spelled the (many) words he got wrong. How can I help him hear the sounds accurately?

    It won’t let me upload the photo...here’s a transcription:

    bag - bage
    mend
    Rose
    has - hes
    went
    is - ise
    was - wuz
    his
    you - wu
    say - sey
    must
    cake
    like - luke
    yes
    ride - ried
    been - bene
    here - her
    lift
    jazz - jase
    buzz
    one - eon, noe
    call
    small - smol
    bell
    doll - dill
    Last edited by jen1134; 02-07-2019, 02:34 PM.
    Jennifer
    Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

    DS16
    MP: Lit 10, VideoText Algebra
    MPOA: High School Comp. II
    HSC: Spanish I, Conceptual Physics, Modern European History, and electives

    DS15
    MP: Biology, Lit 10, VideoText Algebra, Greek Tragedies
    MPOA: High School Comp. II, Fourth Form Latin
    HSC: Modern European History

    DS12
    7M with:
    Second Form Latin, EGR III, and HSC for US History

    DS11
    SC Level 4

    DD9
    3A, with First Form Latin (long story!)

    DD7/8
    Still in SC Level 2

    DD 4/5
    SC Level C

    #2
    I will have to let Cheryl speak about the “technical” side, but has, was, is, you, been, here, one really just need to be memorized. In SC3, Spelling book 2 Cheryl suggests writing the words on notecards and playing games. I had my daughter make them! She wrote one in print and one in cursive. It usually took her two weeks to “get” the words that were not the phonics target. We played go fish and then she did memory by herself. We added to her stack and just moved those words in and out as they tend to get forgotten!
    Christine

    (2019/2020)
    DD1 8/23/09 - SC5/6
    DS2 9/1/11 - SC3,4, 5/6 combo
    DD3 2/9/13 -SC2 to start, MP1 second semester

    Previous Years
    DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4’
    DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2)
    DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK)

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by howiecram View Post
      In SC3, Spelling book 2 Cheryl suggests writing the words on notecards and playing games. I had my daughter make them! She wrote one in print and one in cursive. It usually took her two weeks to “get” the words that were not the phonics target. We played go fish and then she did memory by herself. We added to her stack and just moved those words in and out as they tend to get forgotten!
      Ugh. With all the silent-e and vowel team cards I'm making/using with his sister I should have thought of adjusting the same idea for spelling! Do you just have her say-spell-say when she gets a match?

      Between the two of these kids, I think I need to get an entire ream of cardstock...
      Jennifer
      Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

      DS16
      MP: Lit 10, VideoText Algebra
      MPOA: High School Comp. II
      HSC: Spanish I, Conceptual Physics, Modern European History, and electives

      DS15
      MP: Biology, Lit 10, VideoText Algebra, Greek Tragedies
      MPOA: High School Comp. II, Fourth Form Latin
      HSC: Modern European History

      DS12
      7M with:
      Second Form Latin, EGR III, and HSC for US History

      DS11
      SC Level 4

      DD9
      3A, with First Form Latin (long story!)

      DD7/8
      Still in SC Level 2

      DD 4/5
      SC Level C

      Comment


        #4
        Do you have SC Spelling Book Two at home? If yes, turn to the Weekly Dictations to see how we break down dictation by sound. You can do this with Book One Key Words. Example:
        Before ever writing "bed", he writes in response to your oral directions /b/, /e/, /d/. He can do this on the board or on paper. You can do this with any or all of his words for a time.

        Take 1-2 weeks per lesson if needed to really isolate, cement, and review the various sounds before moving on.

        In general he might be a child who "hears" best while writing, rather than using manipulatives. I think Anita's oldest was like this. He actually preferred writing out the words in SC Spelling over receiving the lesson aurally. This is perfectly fine.

        You might also try phoneme boxes. Search "Elkonin boxes" images for examples. You can make these for the words he missed and for sounds he has a hard time hearing. It is visual, yet not quite so sensory and a little more fun than dictation.
        To help further in filling the various gaps in a way that is not quite so teacher-intensive, y
        ou might add

        Core Skills: Spelling 1
        to work on mastery in an independent and systematic way without requiring him to be messy or otherwise irritated by objects.
        Of course the obvious caveats also apply:


        Be sure his hearing acuity is normal, consider assessment for auditory processing, provide visual with auditory (MP phonograph cards or handmade cards can work), and spend more time on each sound before moving forward.

        And yes, everything howiecram said.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by jen1134 View Post

          Ugh. With all the silent-e and vowel team cards I'm making/using with his sister I should have thought of adjusting the same idea for spelling! Do you just have her say-spell-say when she gets a match?

          Between the two of these kids, I think I need to get an entire ream of cardstock...
          I bought a lot of plain notecards. She made all her Latin flascards too! We did the say spell say for go fish, but not memory.
          Christine

          (2019/2020)
          DD1 8/23/09 - SC5/6
          DS2 9/1/11 - SC3,4, 5/6 combo
          DD3 2/9/13 -SC2 to start, MP1 second semester

          Previous Years
          DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4’
          DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2)
          DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK)

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
            Do you have SC Spelling Book Two at home? If yes, turn to the Weekly Dictations to see how we break down dictation by sound. You can do this with Book One Key Words. Example:
            Before ever writing "bed", he writes in response to your oral directions /b/, /e/, /d/. He can do this on the board or on paper. You can do this with any or all of his words for a time.

            Take 1-2 weeks per lesson if needed to really isolate, cement, and review the various sounds before moving on.

            In general he might be a child who "hears" best while writing, rather than using manipulatives. I think Anita's oldest was like this. He actually preferred writing out the words in SC Spelling over receiving the lesson aurally. This is perfectly fine.

            You might also try phoneme boxes. Search "Elkonin boxes" images for examples. You can make these for the words he missed and for sounds he has a hard time hearing. It is visual, yet not quite so sensory and a little more fun than dictation.
            To help further in filling the various gaps in a way that is not quite so teacher-intensive, y
            ou might add

            Core Skills: Spelling 1
            to work on mastery in an independent and systematic way without requiring him to be messy or otherwise irritated by objects.
            Of course the obvious caveats also apply:


            Be sure his hearing acuity is normal, consider assessment for auditory processing, provide visual with auditory (MP phonograph cards or handmade cards can work), and spend more time on each sound before moving forward.

            And yes, everything howiecram said.
            I completely forgot that I went ahead and bought Book Two when I bought SC3. I just pulled it out after reading your post -- what a wealth of ideas!! Thank you!

            On the Elkonin boxes...will it confuse him spelling-wise if a word only has 3 phonemes but some of those phonemes are made up of a blend/team? Or maybe there's a different way to use them that I didn't see...?

            Now that his reading is going well, and he's grasping the grammar in MSTT, I think I'm going to hold off on starting Prima and do some intensive work on Spelling. If he keeps having trouble, how would I go about having his hearing/auditory processing tested?
            Jennifer
            Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

            DS16
            MP: Lit 10, VideoText Algebra
            MPOA: High School Comp. II
            HSC: Spanish I, Conceptual Physics, Modern European History, and electives

            DS15
            MP: Biology, Lit 10, VideoText Algebra, Greek Tragedies
            MPOA: High School Comp. II, Fourth Form Latin
            HSC: Modern European History

            DS12
            7M with:
            Second Form Latin, EGR III, and HSC for US History

            DS11
            SC Level 4

            DD9
            3A, with First Form Latin (long story!)

            DD7/8
            Still in SC Level 2

            DD 4/5
            SC Level C

            Comment


              #7
              A pediatric audiologist can test hearing acuity. When you're calling around to check prices and insurance coverage ask about auditory processing testing. Some do it and others don't.

              i had my son's hearing tested this fall. It showed low normal. I didn't suspect auditory processing issues, so I didn't ask about it ahead of time. When his test came back normal, I pushed back immediately with the tester. She was perplexed with his asynchronous hearing issues. She quickly did another test that indicated he tested high for auditory processing issues. She was able to refer me to another specialist.

              The acuity test was, "repeat the word I say...cat" etc. The auditory processing was "repeat the third word I say...dog ate cat house". Total fail...didn't get a single correct answer no matter how slowly she spoke. He couldnt distinguish between the words without a context to guess from. He got about half of them correct if the words were given in a sentence, "dog chased the cat".
              Married to DH for 14 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

              DS11- Simply Classical 5/6
              DD9- Simply Classical 5/6 (neurotypical, but schooling with big brother to save mom's sanity)
              DD 6- Classic Core First Grade

              We've completed:
              Classic Core Jr. kindergarten, kindergarten, first grade, and second grade.
              Simply Classical levels B, C, 1, 2, 3, and 4.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by jen1134 View Post

                I completely forgot that I went ahead and bought Book Two when I bought SC3. I just pulled it out after reading your post -- what a wealth of ideas!! Thank you!

                On the Elkonin boxes...will it confuse him spelling-wise if a word only has 3 phonemes but some of those phonemes are made up of a blend/team? Or maybe there's a different way to use them that I didn't see...?

                Now that his reading is going well, and he's grasping the grammar in MSTT, I think I'm going to hold off on starting Prima and do some intensive work on Spelling. If he keeps having trouble, how would I go about having his hearing/auditory processing tested?
                Yes, wait on Prima. We start Latin formally in SC 4 after the child shows strong phonics in both reading & spelling in English.

                You can wait on the Elkonin boxes or use them for simple phonemes. The dictation & phonogram cards may be sufficient to isolate sounds for now.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Those Elkonin boxes would drive me nuts. Pass.

                  My daughter doesn't have the same issues as my son in SC, but she's a terrible speller. First, I had her hearing tested, then I had her tested for auditory processing. Turns out she had better auditory processing than 80% of her peers....could have been 85%, but anyways, I was laughing that others The techniques Andrew Pudewa describes in his Spelling lectures (some are free on YouTube) really hit home for her. We have done the spelling houses with much suceess: you draw houses that have all the same vowel/vowel teams or consonant teams at the beginning or end. So, you would draw a rectangular house around the stacked words: bag, sag, rag. The roof gets the "-AG" for its title.

                  Another technique we used was to make up a story for the words (this doesn't always work for sight words). So, you might say, "The rag made the bag sag!" Then you draw your best picture of a rag making a bag sag. The funnier the better. DD just couldn't get those "air" sounds, so we made a drawing of "a bear eating a pear with a tear in his underwear." I wrote -EAR inside the bear. It was so funny that she still remembers this picture when I ask her to spell any of those words.

                  For sight words, we do a ton of chanting and auditory prompts. That's the say-spell-say method MP is so good at. Pudewa doesn't even think you need to do written work or tiles, Wikki Stix and playdoh for spelling. He had a son with severe dyslexia, and it is my understanding that that is the approach that he used with that son once he was reading at a much later stage.

                  Medically-speaking, my son benefited greatly from ear tubes. Sometimes palatal issues prevent proper drainage. That alone took one ear's 30% hearing to near 100%.
                  Mama to 2, Married 17 years

                  SY 19/20
                  DD 8-3A
                  DS 5-SC C

                  Comment

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