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High school classical studies

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    High school classical studies

    Hello! We are plugging along here, doing pretty well since I cut our 9th grade plan practically in half. I realized the literature books I bought for my son to read this year could quite possibly last us for the rest of high school! Now that we are into a good routine I can see that 5 subjects is our limit at this time. Right now those are Composition, Latin, Algebra, Biology, and 1/2 literature, 1/2 religion. For literature, we have read Shakespeare's As You Like It and are now reading Pride & Prejudice. He's also just finished The Lord of the Rings on his own. All three are wonderful (of course). He is not a big fiction reader, but he has absolutely loved reading these books, and they have been the occasion for many conversations where he has been able to deepen his understanding of human nature, social interaction, Christian morality...so good!

    One of the subjects we dropped to have time for this was Classical Studies (Homer). Compared to Austen, Tolkien, and Shakespeare, with their Christian outlook, the Iliad felt very dark to my son. He could follow the story, and he found the MP video lectures interesting, but he was not enjoying it very much at all. For any of my other children, I would say, this is Western culture, we just have to read it even you don't love it. But with this child, I don't know if that is going to work. To be honest, my other children are already primed to love Homer because they've read D'Aulaire's and all the children's versions of Homer many times, whereas this child has always disliked mythology and viewed it with suspicion. I think that to do Homer he will need to work hard at it and it will take the entire year, and then it will be overwhelming for him not to have any uplifting literature to study. I'm working on his plan for 10th grade, and I think we should do some history since we didn't do that this year. He would much rather study the history of the Christian west, or American history, and read English literature. What would you recommend?

    Thank you!
    Catherine
    Catherine

    2019-20
    DS16, 10th
    DS13, 7th
    DS11, 6th
    DD11, 6th
    DS7, 1st
    DD4, JrK
    DS 17 mos

    Homeschooling 4 with MP
    2 in classical school

    #2
    Interesting! You might need to create your own Classical Studies course from the MP options.

    Has he studied Famous Men of Rome and Famous Men of Greece? If not, these books and the Book of the Ancient Romans and Book of the Ancient Greeks might be more appealing to him than the epic literature. The material is presented in a non-fiction historical manner, rather than fictional, and they make good/evil clear, which is important to your son; yet they will give him good background knowledge. You could pair those with others in the collection to create high school classes. Ancient Rome one year; ancient Greece the next with the ancient wall maps as his backdrop.
    Adding Horatius poetry memorization/recitation will inspire in a form with which he is already comfortable.

    Then "reward" him by moving directly to American history the following year with both of the above as the foundation.

    You might require retellings of Homer & Virgil to accompany the courses you create, but you can choose the "tame" versions rendered for children or youth. If only to converse with the others in your family, but certainly for reading all of the great works he wants to read (Milton, Shakespeare) he will benefit from familiarity with all of the references.

    If he balks, you can assure him that his understanding and appreciation of both American history and English literature will be far greater with Classical Studies than without them. Maybe he can help you create the course outline, syllabus, and books to study. When my son entered 9th grade, this tactic worked well. He loved helping to form his own coursework, plan his own classes, and see how various works fit together. This has served him well. Even today when he embarks on a course of study at home in his leisure time, he assembles a stack of books, reference and otherwise, and then maps a plan for study. It seems you have a similar opportunity in front of you.

    You might also post this on the 9-12 forum, as those families will have more familiarity with creating such a compilation of study.

    More than anything, I would not push him into feelings of darkness. As you know, such heaviness for our children is greater to bear than we can comprehend. Just appeal to his love of history and literature to secure foundations of knowledge and insight, and he will be fine.
    Last edited by cherylswope; 02-05-2019, 07:30 AM.

    Comment


      #3
      Hi Cheryl!

      Yes, he studied the three Famous Men books and Horatius in middle school. I could use the Dorothy Mills books and the retellings, and then possibly some memorization from the originals.

      I will need to bite the bullet and combine Composition, Logic, and Literature in our 1-hour English slot in order to make time for a Classical Studies class. It really is all so valuable. I need to make my peace with our snail’s pace.
      Catherine

      2019-20
      DS16, 10th
      DS13, 7th
      DS11, 6th
      DD11, 6th
      DS7, 1st
      DD4, JrK
      DS 17 mos

      Homeschooling 4 with MP
      2 in classical school

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by CatherineS View Post
        Hi Cheryl!

        Yes, he studied the three Famous Men books and Horatius in middle school. I could use the Dorothy Mills books and the retellings, and then possibly some memorization from the originals.

        I will need to bite the bullet and combine Composition, Logic, and Literature in our 1-hour English slot in order to make time for a Classical Studies class. It really is all so valuable. I need to make my peace with our snail’s pace.
        Remember that you can cycle through those each week. So Comp two days, Literature two days, Logic one. Some families use a block schedule where that time slot is entirely devoted to literature until Lit is done, then you use it for Composition until done, etc. Sonce composition is a skills course, you might not want a long gap between levels, but I’m sure there would be a way to use block scheduling for other content subjects as well which would allow a regular flow of work for skills.
        Jennifer
        Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

        2019-2020 Plans:

        DS16
        MP10 Lit, MP-Holt Biology, Light to the Nations II, Spanish
        MPOA: Algebra I, High School Comp II

        DS15
        As above, plus:
        MP Greek Tragedies; no Spanish
        MPOA: Fourth Form Latin

        DS12: 7M subbing Sea to Shining Sea for American history

        DS11: Simply Classical Level 4

        DD9: 3A, with First Form Latin (long story!)

        DD7/8: Simply Classical Level 3

        DD 4/5: Simply Classical Level C (NT using SC for two-year PreK due to January birthday)

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by jen1134 View Post

          Remember that you can cycle through those each week. So Comp two days, Literature two days, Logic one. Some families use a block schedule where that time slot is entirely devoted to literature until Lit is done, then you use it for Composition until done, etc. Sonce composition is a skills course, you might not want a long gap between levels, but I’m sure there would be a way to use block scheduling for other content subjects as well which would allow a regular flow of work for skills.
          Yes, thank you Jen, this definitely works. We have done this before and are doing it now for a religion/literature slot. Hence the snail's pace. :-)
          Catherine

          2019-20
          DS16, 10th
          DS13, 7th
          DS11, 6th
          DD11, 6th
          DS7, 1st
          DD4, JrK
          DS 17 mos

          Homeschooling 4 with MP
          2 in classical school

          Comment

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