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OT/ID bracelet

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    OT/ID bracelet

    My 6 year-old middle son, who has ASD and ADHD, just had a traumatic visit to the ER last week. He ended up having a 2-hour surgery stitching up his face and all that entails. I had thought about an ID bracelet in the past and it was on my "list" of things to look into....However, after that experience (I was there the entire time), I thought how helpful an ID bracelet stating his ASD diagnosis would be that gave some quick info to medical personnel without me having to explain it repeatedly. For instance, his sensitivity to lights, sounds, etc. Have any of you purchased this type of bracelet and where did you find one?

    In other news, even in the midst of the ER, bandages and family crisis-mode it's put us in, I've been able to continue to school the children through the SC materials. I think it's a big credit to the curriculum!
    Last edited by GraceEllen; 10-23-2018, 08:46 AM. Reason: Clarify title
    expat mama south of the border
    DD MP8
    DS SC 2
    DS2 SC C
    DS3 SC A

    #2
    Re: OT/ID bracelet

    No ER visits, thankfully, but when my kids were little, I bought dog tags for both my oldest two kids. I considered ID bracelets, but worried a child predator would have it too easy if they wanted to pick off one of my kiddies. (Paranoid or realistic?)

    I landed on dog tags because you can imprint a TON of information on them, and the nature of the “locking mechanism” on the necklace means they won’t break off, get lost, or be easy for a stranger to read (if stored under a shirt or coat). And each set is traditionally two tags. My sons’s tag had all his information on one tag (name, address, pertinent info) and the second tag was a series of prayers for protection. He wore them from the time he was about 4 until he was sufficiently verbal — about age 7.

    I found them on Etsy.
    Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
    Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
    Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
    Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

    “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
    ~Pope St John Paul II

    Comment


      #3
      Re: OT/ID bracelet

      My favorite place to buy them is https://www.laurenshope.com/ They have a HUGE selection, and they are really cute! I can still fit quite a bit on them, and the side with the information is on the inside part of the bracelets. I don't put the children's names, just diagnosis and phone numbers for both parents. Bracelets are easier for us to manage, and I worried about something being around my son's neck (he is not careful). All my kids have a bracelet, because you can't talk if rendered unconscious. It's especially important for my daughter with eye issues because her pupils are fixed (due to eye surgeries), which is not a good thing if you also happen to be unconscious, LOL!

      I will say that when my son broke his arm very badly, his wearing a bracelet didn't matter. We still had to explain everything to everyone. It would only have helped if he had arrived at the hospital unattended.

      ETA that apparently I lied, at least one of them has their name (probably all if one does), LOL. But, they curve towards the arm, so you have to flip it out to see the name and the writing isn't easy to see from any distance. So, I'm not worried. But, if you are, you can leave off the name. Sorry for accidentally lying!
      Last edited by Cheryl in CA; 10-24-2018, 12:11 PM.
      Cheryl, mom to:

      ds 24, graduated
      ds 23, graduated
      dd 15, 9th Grade
      dd 12, 6th Grade
      ds 10, 4nd Grade

      Comment


        #4
        Re: OT: ID Bracelet for ASD

        Originally posted by GraceEllen View Post
        My 6 year-old middle son, who has ASD and ADHD, just had a traumatic visit to the ER last week. He ended up having a 2-hour surgery stitching up his face and all that entails. I had thought about an ID bracelet in the past and it was on my "list" of things to look into....However, after that experience (I was there the entire time), I thought how helpful an ID bracelet stating his ASD diagnosis would be that gave some quick info to medical personnel without me having to explain it repeatedly. For instance, his sensitivity to lights, sounds, etc. Have any of you purchased this type of bracelet and where did you find one?

        In other news, even in the midst of the ER, bandages and family crisis-mode it's put us in, I've been able to continue to school the children through the SC materials. I think it's a big credit to the curriculum!
        Thank you, Grace, and I'm so sorry about the ER. I've found that even with bracelets, the ER staff will benefit from your quick, calm instructions. "He will do better if you keep noise low, lights low, voices low, with minimal touch. Autism. Sensory issues."

        We once used AmericanMedical-ID.com, but we had trouble with smeared lettering and the engraving is expensive. Moreover, the metal bracelets need to be removed for MRIs. They do have other options.

        Our new favorite is the idbandco.com. We have used them for several years and really like their inexpensive, brightly colored silicone bracelets. Unlike some of the "fashionable" options, they still look like medical bracelets and get the attention of medical personnel, yet they are durable and can be worn in the shower, in MRIs, etc. Attached is a photo in which you can see my son's red band. And our pet cat.

        Like Anita's, our Michael wears a dog tag too. We're more concerned about him because of his height and the way he might appear intimidating, rather than ill, when he is having difficulties.

        Michelle wears only the wrist band.
        Attached Files

        Comment


          #5
          Re: OT/ID bracelet

          Cheryl makes an excellent point! You definitely want them to look like a medical bracelet! We picked ones that are cute but still obviously medical bracelets. Medical personal will check what you are wearing, but we wanted to be sure it was obvious.
          Cheryl, mom to:

          ds 24, graduated
          ds 23, graduated
          dd 15, 9th Grade
          dd 12, 6th Grade
          ds 10, 4nd Grade

          Comment


            #6
            Re: OT/ID bracelet

            Thank you all for sharing what has worked for you. This is such an encouraging space.

            I am looking into these bracelets & tags, as we are traveling soon and I think it might be helpful.
            Though, as Cheryl wrote, there is no replacement for a calm, succinct explanation of the child’s needs.

            ~Blessings
            Grace
            expat mama south of the border
            DD MP8
            DS SC 2
            DS2 SC C
            DS3 SC A

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