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Drawing in SC-1

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    Drawing in SC-1

    My 6 year old gets upset whenever an art/craft/drawing project is assigned in SC-1. He says they don’t look right, is frustrated and says he can’t draw. Maybe the ambiguity of the task is frustrating because he is a concrete thinker? In general he has a low frustrational threshold, which I have been slowly pushing. Sc-1 is doing it with the increase in writing and length of time at the table. Depending on the subject, we may skip it or try it. Today it was the week 6 science/art project of painting a sunset. We read Hailstones and Halibut Bones, I gave a brief demonstration with simple lines of colors on my paper and set him to work. Within minutes he was in tears because it just wasn’t good. Is this one of the things we just keep trying? Other strategies?
    Heidi

    2018-19
    dd- 3m
    ds- SC 1
    dd- SC B

    #2
    Re: Drawing in SC-1

    We really like drawing, coloring, and painting not only for the fine-motor practice and neurological connections but also to aid comprehension.

    You can substitute any of these for now, but do not pass on the activity completely:

    1. Tracing
    Give him tracing paper, possibly anchored with clips or lightly adhesive tape, so he can trace the design from a book cover or favorite scene.

    2. Coloring
    You might draw the outline yourself. Let him color yours. Be free to be humble and note, "Mine is not very artistic, so if you want to make your own I won't be offended!"

    3. Teach drawing.
    He can learn to use the simplest tools: curves, lines, and dots. These can make his drawings more pleasing. It might be worth finding some teach-yourself-to draw books for young children at the library. (If he would melt at the very thought, save this for subtly laying the books on the coffee table for him -- or yourself -- to pick up and peruse.)

    4. Matching
    Maybe you could just draw three horizontal blocks. He finds the three dominant colors in the painting or picture and fills his blocks with those colors.

    5. Copying
    If you draw reasonably well, you can draw something simple for him to copy beneath yours.

    6. Lettering
    He might prefer copying or tracing the lettering or font of the book's title or a chapter title. Stencils might be fun for this.

    7. Relax
    If you do not draw well, you can help him by making your own feeble versions. Laugh at the awkwardness but also note where you captured something worthwhile. "Even though it is a stick figure, I gave him his hat and a big smile!" Watch your own drawing improve over time.

    8. Play music
    This is a good time for your classical selection. With any of the above, you can play the music for 15 minutes or so without talking.

    9. Note the good ones!
    As he grows, display his favorite pieces and toss the others. Few artists (no artists?) are satisfied with every work they create.


    Clearly he wants to do well. This is good! Just dial back the task without losing the purpose or benefit, and maybe have a smidge more fun so he can be successful.

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Drawing in SC-1

      Many people grow up thinking that artists come up with an idea, and then put pen to paper where their idea magically appears. I had a composition student who thought the same thing about writers. When I shared with him that I'm a professional writer, and how it can take days to get a single sentence to sound right, his eyes grew wide. It had never occurred to him that writers had to work hard to create.

      Maybe if you can find some in-progress or "fail" pictures from professional artists, he would be able to see the process involved. I used to get SO upset that my paintings never turned out the way I saw them in my head. Then I ended up with professional artists for in-laws and found out that every. single. fine artist. uses REFERENCES for their work. I had always thought artists painted from their heads. This was a huge eye-opener for me and helped cure my perfectionism.

      I also second Cheryl's tracing idea. That is how my boys started out -- and this is how far one of them has come: Click image for larger version

Name:	pen-ink.jpg
Views:	1
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ID:	104200 He did this as a free hand study from one of his favorite books; note the word study...another thing every artist does! Many people say that he is "gifted" or has "natural talent". What they never saw were the HOURS he spent each week, and sometimes each day, working on drawing. He's been voluntarily practicing like that since he was at least 7. That's another thing artists do: they practice constantly.
      Last edited by jen1134; 10-12-2018, 02:38 PM.
      Jennifer


      2018-2019
      DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
      DS-12 (6M)
      DS-10 (SC3)
      DD-8 (MP2)
      DD-6 (SC2)
      DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Drawing in SC-1

        Jen,

        That is a beautiful picture! Thank you for sharing. His older sister loves to draw and practices on everything (currently hermit crabs on her vocabulary drill box.)

        Cheryl, I’m printing your suggestions to keep handy with my curriculum guide.

        I think my personal struggle is that once he gets frustrated it’s difficult to continue with school. Sometimes he will choose to draw independently during his free time. I’m going to think about how to encourage some the skills then too.
        Heidi

        2018-19
        dd- 3m
        ds- SC 1
        dd- SC B

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Drawing in SC-1

          Originally posted by VAmom View Post
          Jen,

          That is a beautiful picture! Thank you for sharing. His older sister loves to draw and practices on everything (currently hermit crabs on her vocabulary drill box.)

          Cheryl, I’m printing your suggestions to keep handy with my curriculum guide.

          I think my personal struggle is that once he gets frustrated it’s difficult to continue with school. Sometimes he will choose to draw independently during his free time. I’m going to think about how to encourage some the skills then too.
          I wonder if he’s comparing his drawings to his sister’s??
          Jennifer


          2018-2019
          DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
          DS-12 (6M)
          DS-10 (SC3)
          DD-8 (MP2)
          DD-6 (SC2)
          DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Drawing in SC-1

            Also, boys draw differently than girls! As Andrew Pudewa says, “Boys draw adverbs, girls draw adjectives.” Boys want their rockets shooting (so to show movement their picture might look “messy”). Girls want flowers and rainbows, so their pictures are “pretty.”
            Christine

            (2018-2019)
            DD1 8/23/09 - SC4
            DS2 9/1/11 - SC2
            DD3 2/9/13 - MPK

            Previous Years
            DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3)
            DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK)
            DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others!)

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Drawing in SC-1

              I don’t think he’s trying to compete with his sister because he gets upset with her drawings too.

              Christine, that’s an interesting reminder. He does try to draw more action than his sister.

              A good example might be today he was supposed to illustrate Genesis 1:1, an abstract concept. He didn’t know what to draw, didn’t think drawing the earth made sense or looked good and generally was disgruntled. He did not want to trace the picture I had found. Once he gets frustrated, I can stop school, allow him to cool down and resume school later with a chance he’s feeling positive again or press on. Some days stopping school isn’t as much of an option because of time constraints or we would deviate too far from his routine, thus upsetting him further.

              I think I’m stuck on this particular issue because it seems solvable. It’s also a mountain I may not die on. He really enjoys coloring, so much so that I ordered him the Rod & Staff Bible coloring book to use alongside our Bible time. He also recently started drawing in the dry erase board. Maybe I need to take it back a few steps, then work forward again.
              Heidi

              2018-19
              dd- 3m
              ds- SC 1
              dd- SC B

              Comment

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