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Simply Classical for Reluctant Writer?

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    #16
    Re: Simply Classical for Reluctant Writer?

    Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
    Yes, as Christine describes, MP writing is intended to be incremental over time, clearly taught, and modeled. SC Writing breaks the steps down even further. Whether you choose SC Writing: Step-by-Step Sentences or create your own step-by-step approach, you will want to teach writing and spelling. Sometimes we become so adept at accommodating that we avoid teaching!

    If you want to start adding SC Spelling and/or SC Writing, you can do this. We recommend SC Writing's Bible edition for add-on intervention with students familiar with Bible stories. This saves time because it does not require the read-alouds connected to the read-aloud editions. It can be added to his Christian Studies.

    Whether you add a writing curriculum or not, you may continue with oral work for much of his day. Just be sure to teach writing and spelling systematically at some point each day. Explain that he WILL be expected to write daily. My Thankfulness Journal can be a useful too for this if he knows cursive and needs little more than practice. Small daily doses of writing combine with reflections of gratitude that can be important to cultivate at this age. If he needs more instruction in mechanics, consider SC Writing or CS: LA 1, 2.


    Regarding an assessment, if you can find a good clinician specializing in dyslexia and dysgraphia, an evaluation might be worth pursuing, if only to have diagnostic evidence of a continued need for accommodations as he grows older. Some clinicians appreciate homeschoolers and their willingness to do what is necessary at home. "If I could just clone you!" To find someone worth the time and expense, you might poll a local group or doctors you trust. It is possible that he is simply a preteen boy who prefers accommodations to the hard work of writing, but an evaluation might help you rule out something more.

    In the meantime, some of these tips may help. Just remember that with MP/SC we do not mind accommodating, but we also want to teach. Whenever you create your "game plan," be sure to include both for best results.
    Hello again, I'm reviving this query I had earlier in September about my son's reluctance to write. I have a couple more questions - I hope you don't mind. Cheryl and Christine, you both gave me good direction, already. As an update, I purchased TS II and I feel confident it will be a better fit right now than the Spelling Workout, and I am willing to drop back again to TSI or SC if this doesn't work, but I think TS II will be appropriate.

    Questions I am still pondering regarding writing:

    1) As copied above, Cheryl suggested SC Writing Book II - Bible stories (which I am sure my son would like), and in another reply to my questions, she also said that ATFF would be fine since I already purchased it. Perhaps, I am just fishing around with different products unnecessarily, but ATFF isn't as intuitive to me as the MP products. I trust ATFF is an excellent product, but does anyone have experience they can reflect on to help me understand the difference between ATFF and SC Writing, and if SC Writing would be a better fit? There is something about the straightforward presentation of material in MP products that is like a healing balm for me and I think it makes it easier for me to work with my children with these materials. But maybe I am making an issue of this unnecessarily.

    2) What is the next step after SC Writing? Is it CC Fable? Or ATFF?

    3) Just to clarify, SC Writing has incremental lessons with direct instruction in the writing process, i.e. choosing descriptive words, recognizing parts of speech. And this is what sets it apart from the study guides for Literature, Classical Studies, and Christian Studies. Otherwise, it would seem that simply writing answers in complete sentences would be enough. But the SC Writing walks the student through the process. Am I understanding that correctly?

    I hope my questions make sense.

    And - I've been watching this year's and previous year's Sodalitas presentations and reading Simply Classical. I could weep, I am so grateful to have found this way of homeschooling!

    Thank you!
    Monica

    Comment


      #17
      Re: Simply Classical for Reluctant Writer?

      Originally posted by KikaMarie View Post
      Hello again, I'm reviving this query I had earlier in September about my son's reluctance to write. I have a couple more questions - I hope you don't mind. Cheryl and Christine, you both gave me good direction, already. As an update, I purchased TS II and I feel confident it will be a better fit right now than the Spelling Workout, and I am willing to drop back again to TSI or SC if this doesn't work, but I think TS II will be appropriate.

      Questions I am still pondering regarding writing:

      1) As copied above, Cheryl suggested SC Writing Book II - Bible stories (which I am sure my son would like), and in another reply to my questions, she also said that ATFF would be fine since I already purchased it. Perhaps, I am just fishing around with different products unnecessarily, but ATFF isn't as intuitive to me as the MP products. I trust ATFF is an excellent product, but does anyone have experience they can reflect on to help me understand the difference between ATFF and SC Writing, and if SC Writing would be a better fit? There is something about the straightforward presentation of material in MP products that is like a healing balm for me and I think it makes it easier for me to work with my children with these materials. But maybe I am making an issue of this unnecessarily.

      ----in Simply Classical 5&6, Intro to Composition will be used, instead of ATFF. If you are using SC Writing Book 2, this might be a good transition. If your child needs more help after SC Writing Book 2, in SC4, Core Skills Language Arts 1& 2 are being used for the writing, along with the literature guides.

      2) What is the next step after SC Writing? Is it CC Fable? Or ATFF? --- SEE ABOVE

      3) Just to clarify, SC Writing has incremental lessons with direct instruction in the writing process, i.e. choosing descriptive words, recognizing parts of speech. And this is what sets it apart from the study guides for Literature, Classical Studies, and Christian Studies. Otherwise, it would seem that simply writing answers in complete sentences would be enough. But the SC Writing walks the student through the process. Am I understanding that correctly? - YES!

      I hope my questions make sense.

      And - I've been watching this year's and previous year's Sodalitas presentations and reading Simply Classical. I could weep, I am so grateful to have found this way of homeschooling!

      Thank you!
      Monica

      I answered in bold above. I know Cheryl will offer a more complete answer, but you are on the right track! I think at the end of the year, you will know more which direction to go. The SC5&6 booklist is a sticky here and has some conversation with it.

      There was also some discussion comparing ATFF with Intro to Comp on the K-8 board. Let me post it here: https://forum.memoriapress.com/showt...-Grade-writing
      Last edited by howiecram; 09-30-2018, 07:46 AM.
      Christine

      (2018-2019)
      DD1 8/23/09 - SC4
      DS2 9/1/11 - SC2
      DD3 2/9/13 - MPK

      Previous Years
      DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3)
      DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK)
      DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others!)

      Comment


        #18
        Re: Simply Classical for Reluctant Writer?

        Answers in bold below:

        Originally posted by KikaMarie View Post
        Hello again, I'm reviving this query I had earlier in September about my son's reluctance to write. I have a couple more questions - I hope you don't mind. Cheryl and Christine, you both gave me good direction, already. As an update, I purchased TS II and I feel confident it will be a better fit right now than the Spelling Workout, and I am willing to drop back again to TSI or SC if this doesn't work, but I think TS II will be appropriate.

        Questions I am still pondering regarding writing:

        1) As copied above, Cheryl suggested SC Writing Book II - Bible stories (which I am sure my son would like), and in another reply to my questions, she also said that ATFF would be fine since I already purchased it. Perhaps, I am just fishing around with different products unnecessarily, but ATFF isn't as intuitive to me as the MP products. I trust ATFF is an excellent product, but does anyone have experience they can reflect on to help me understand the difference between ATFF and SC Writing, and if SC Writing would be a better fit? There is something about the straightforward presentation of material in MP products that is like a healing balm for me and I think it makes it easier for me to work with my children with these materials. But maybe I am making an issue of this unnecessarily.

        SC Writing One & Two walk the SC student through the basic mechanics that other students seem to "get" without being walked through them so incrementally! This includes capitalizing the first letter of every sentence, knowing where your sentence needs to end, and placing an end mark there every time. SC Writing I makes these automatic by the end when the student composes his own sentence(s). SC Writing II continues with more advanced writing, such as the use of adjectives & adverbs, the identification of main idea & detail, and the writing of a paragraph to convey a main idea.


        You're most certainly not making an issue of this unnecessarily. When teaching my own children (reluctant writers, specific learning disabilities, ADHD, autism, OT/fine-motor issues, weak working memory, & more), I learned very clearly the need for practice, practice, practice of the basic writing mechanics AND the need to make it seem as if we were not practicing so much! SC Writing came about because I could find nothing that integrated real, substantive academic content into inherently remedial exercises.


        2) What is the next step after SC Writing? Is it CC Fable? Or ATFF?

        After SC Writing One (SC Level 2) and SC Writing Two (SC Level 3), we spend a year practicing the basic composition skills through academic content in SC 4. Students do all of these in SC 4:
        a) learn to answer questions about literature in good sentences via the Literature Guides,
        b) practice cursive with longer lessons in New American Cursive,
        c) practice writing in academics such as with Prima Latina,
        d) review the SC Writing basics in Core Skills: Language Arts 1 and 2.

        Honestly this is plenty of writing for our SC students, so we did not add a writing book for this level.



        Just fyi, in SC 5-6 we do not use ATFF, nor do we embark on CC Fable. We're still honing those emerging writing abilities. We use MP's new Intro to Composition version linked to our SC 5-6 children's literature.


        3) Just to clarify, SC Writing has incremental lessons with direct instruction in the writing process, i.e. choosing descriptive words, recognizing parts of speech. And this is what sets it apart from the study guides for Literature, Classical Studies, and Christian Studies.


        Yes! Consider SC Writing "pre-study guides" writing instruction.

        Otherwise, it would seem that simply writing answers in complete sentences would be enough. But the SC Writing walks the student through the process. Am I understanding that correctly?


        Yes, you are correct.

        I hope my questions make sense.


        They do!

        And - I've been watching this year's and previous year's Sodalitas presentations and reading Simply Classical. I could weep, I am so grateful to have found this way of homeschooling!

        Thank you!
        Monica

        You are very welcome. We are thankful you found us!
        Last edited by cherylswope; 10-01-2018, 09:36 AM.

        Comment


          #19
          Re: Simply Classical for Reluctant Writer?

          Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
          Answers in bold below:
          Thank you so much, Christine and Cheryl. As I try to locate the most appropriate materials for my sons, I really benefit from these details you provided regarding the MP materials and the objectives.

          Comment


            #20
            Re: Simply Classical for Reluctant Writer?

            Hello, I have another question about the writing/spelling work with my 11.5-year-old.

            Here is where we are now: I have started TSII and CSLA2 with him, and I ordered Simply Classical Writing II (Bible stories) and some cursive materials for lessons (NAC2) and copy work (Cursive Copybook II).

            Regarding the Grammar Recitation and the CSLA4 book that I ordered and had begun with him and his brother as part of grade 4 core, should I just let the CSLA4 go? I had planned to keep up with the English Grammar Recitation I since he is already familiar with capitalization rules, sentences, parts of speech, end punctuation, and some of the other punctuation in the latter part of the book. But perhaps this isn't necessary or it's just not appropriate while we do the other components? Or should I just continue with it orally? I don't have him do the copy work in EGRI yet, because this is still too much writing for him, but I get him to do the short exercises which are often circling and drawing lines to identify words. Much of EGRI we covered last year with another program, so he has familiarity with the concepts.

            As always, I send this query with a grateful heart!

            Monica

            Comment


              #21
              Re: Simply Classical for Reluctant Writer?

              Yes, continue EGR I with exercises in writing, on the board, or orally.

              Drop CSLA 4 and save it for summer review or for another year. He is doing well with everything you are already doing! And we are thankful for your thankful heart. ❤

              Comment


                #22
                Re: Simply Classical for Reluctant Writer?

                Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
                Yes, continue EGR I with exercises in writing, on the board, or orally.

                Drop CSLA 4 and save it for summer review or for another year. He is doing well with everything you are already doing! And we are thankful for your thankful heart. ❤
                Thank you!

                Comment

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