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Transcripts or High School Aged Students Using Simply Classical

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  • Transcripts or High School Aged Students Using Simply Classical

    I am working on homeschool plans and had this moment (that I am sure I should have processed much earlier than now) that perhaps I should be doing something different this year with regards to record keeping with my 14 and 15 year old who use Simply Classical. They are still on level 3 about half way through it. I supplement with additional read alouds that they do with their siblings.

    There is no way I can imagine them officially "graduating" at age 18 and will be continuing to homeschool them (God willing) past that age.

    Does anyone have advice or insight?

    We live in Indiana where thankfully regulations are pretty laid back for homeschooling, by the way: https://www.cnn.com/2018/07/30/healt...udy/index.html

    Thank you,

    Heather Brandt

  • cherylswope
    replied
    Re: Transcripts or High School Aged Students Using Simply Classical

    Thank you, Heather!

    Leave a comment:


  • HeatherB
    replied
    Re: Transcripts or High School Aged Students Using Simply Classical

    I don't mind you talking about how many levels you're going to do because I had wondered the same thing. I just told the kids and they said, "Good!" ha! We all appreciate Simply Classical, Cheryl.

    Heather

    Leave a comment:


  • Cheryl in CA
    replied
    Re: Transcripts or High School Aged Students Using Simply Classical

    Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
    Yes, ma'am. That is the intent. Remaining levels 5-6, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12 can be taught as one-year accelerated courses (for our older or more advanced students) or taken one year at a time for two-year courses, as with SC 3 and 4.

    We hope for 5-6 to be available within the next few months. With conferences behind me, I'm "disappearing" again later this week to work more on 5-6. For those waiting for R&S 3 arithmetic plans, I intend to submit those first! We'll announce if anything becomes ready.

    We now have a complete, bound overview of SC A, B, C and SC 1-12. Our Sodalitas attendees received this. We might be able to make this available when MP has time.

    Pardon the excursion from your original question, Heather!
    Thank you, that is very interesting! Would the bound overview appear in the main SC area when/if it becomes available?

    Heather, please accept my apologies as well!

    Leave a comment:


  • cherylswope
    replied
    Re: Transcripts or High School Aged Students Using Simply Classical

    Yes, ma'am. That is the intent. Remaining levels 5-6, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12 can be taught as one-year accelerated courses (for our older or more advanced students) or taken one year at a time for two-year courses, as with SC 3 and 4.

    We hope for 5-6 to be available within the next few months. With conferences behind me, I'm "disappearing" again later this week to work more on 5-6. For those waiting for R&S 3 arithmetic plans, I intend to submit those first! We'll announce if anything becomes ready.

    We now have a complete, bound overview of SC A, B, C and SC 1-12. Our Sodalitas attendees received this. We might be able to make this available when MP has time.

    Pardon the excursion from your original question, Heather!

    Leave a comment:


  • Cheryl in CA
    replied
    Re: Transcripts or High School Aged Students Using Simply Classical

    Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
    You could contact HSLDA, yes.

    See also the Wrightslaw pages such as this one.
    Thank you :-)

    Out of curiosity, will SC go up to SC12?

    Leave a comment:


  • cherylswope
    replied
    Re: Transcripts or High School Aged Students Using Simply Classical

    You could contact HSLDA, yes.

    See also the Wrightslaw pages such as this one.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cheryl in CA
    replied
    Re: Transcripts or High School Aged Students Using Simply Classical

    Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
    Hi, Heather.

    Yes, these are the years to step back and consider the future! If you can combine the teen years with volunteer experience(s) in his/her favorite areas when he/she is ready, this can work well. Graduation may be extended up to 21, as sometimes occurs in public school special-needs programs. If you do this, you might consider dual enrollment in a community college with accommodations for your son when he is a little older.

    Of course for any modifications you will need to see your state's requirements.

    For a better and more complete answer, see this from my friend Kathy Kuhl: LearnDifferently.
    How would one find out if graduation can be extended to 21 in their state? Would they contact HSLDA?

    Leave a comment:


  • cherylswope
    replied
    Re: Transcripts or High School Aged Students Using Simply Classical

    Your children have come very far and are in good hands!

    My 23yo's are still learning, though not as formally as when we homeschooled full-time. Michael works 4 days a week and studies on his own. Michelle & I continue voice, piano, Latin, poetry and other literature. All of us attend the adult Bible class as a family every Sunday. College or not, we continue learning, so they do too!

    Eta: I should add that Michael is just now becoming a strong writer. You may have seen his first piece of public writing, a book review, on FB. He continues listens to good audio books, and this assists everything. Both M&M continue to write in nightly thankfulness journals, among other things. They both "study" singing through our church choir. As they have become adults, they enjoy contributing to the household and church through their work. It can all work out, Heather. Not perfectly, but quite well.
    Last edited by cherylswope; 07-30-2018, 02:26 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • HeatherB
    replied
    Re: Transcripts or High School Aged Students Using Simply Classical

    I admit I get teary eyed and overwhelmed because I feel like we still have so much father to go or at least attempt to go academically (particularly since we adopted them when they were older). I think I've told them before I will keep teaching them as long as they are willing to learn (I mean into adulthood). I know they have goals they want to reach (as in learning some Latin and more history and math skills and improved reading for Ligia).

    Heather

    Leave a comment:


  • cherylswope
    replied
    Re: Transcripts or High School Aged Students Using Simply Classical

    Hi, Heather.

    Yes, these are the years to step back and consider the future! If you can combine the teen years with volunteer experience(s) in his/her favorite areas when he/she is ready, this can work well. Graduation may be extended up to 21, as sometimes occurs in public school special-needs programs. If you do this, you might consider dual enrollment in a community college with accommodations for your son when he is a little older.

    Of course for any modifications you will need to see your state's requirements.

    For a better and more complete answer, see this from my friend Kathy Kuhl: LearnDifferently.

    Leave a comment:

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