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    Age Requirement for MPOA entrance?

    I am looking ahead toward the diploma program and wondering if a child could enter the program in 7th or 8th? Course wise, it looks likes my daughter could enter as she will be in Algebra I in 7th. I like the idea of her taking college courses 11-12 grade but I also like the idea of her completing the diploma program. My thought process is she could enter in 7th and finish after 10th with a MPOA diploma and then go into to community college for grades 11th-12th. Thank you in advance for your input.
    2020-2021
    7th year Homeschooling
    4th year MP
    Home + MPOA
    5th, 2nd, 2nd, K

    #2
    I’ll let Paul discuss MPOA policy. I just want to point out a few things to keep in mind. By doing as you say, you are graduating your student at the age of a typical sophomore- 15/16 and then sending them to community college as a full time college student. There are often advantages to not graduating early. One is that in many states, dual enrollment is free or reduced in cost. You can’t dual enroll if you have already earned a diploma. The other is earning scholarships to four year universities. Often the best scholarships are for incoming freshmen. There are scholarships for transfer students, but they often aren’t as big. Many colleges will count a graduating senior as a freshmen even if they have some dual enroll credits, but if a student graduated with a diploma at age 15/16 and then did two full years of community as an already graduated student then they would be considered a transfer student. Now, all this varies by state and college so just keep it in mind. It may or may not apply to you.
    i have had three of my six (so far) take algebra 1 in 7th. Two took AP calculus in 11th (the other is only in 8th) and then one dual enrolled in CC in 12th to take calculus 3. That son also took Classical 1-2 in 7th and 8th. There are still plenty more high school classes to take to fill up 11-12th. In our case, our state doesn’t offer free dual enrollment so I had no incentive to dual enroll. I placed more value on getting in two more years of Christian classical education before I threw them to the wolves of public university. In my area, community college is just glorified public school. All the reasons we choose to homeschool rather than go to public school applied to grades 13-14 (as I think of community college). True- they do get actual college credit which can reduce time and costs at university. But often students can get an almost full ride to a state school so money may not be a big deal. For us the value of getting two years of an advanced Christian education was more valuable than going to a public community college those two years.
    consider classical studies- if you do CS 1 and 2 in 7th and 8th, you then have four more years to do CS 3,4,5 and (shout out to Paul! Hopefully 6!!!) in the next four years. You wouldn’t have time for all that in just two years. Same with literature and history- you’d miss out in half of the good things that MPOA offers.
    For sure consider taking MPOA classes starting in 7th, just think about all the nuances of actually getting that diploma four years later (after grade 10) verses staying in high school, dual enrolling in the advanced math and science you need and maybe a comp or history class while not actually graduating till 12th and then entering university as an incoming freshmen rather than a transfer student.
    Last edited by momgineer; 02-23-2021, 10:17 AM.
    Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
    DD, 26, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
    DS, 24, BS '18 mechanical engineering
    DS, 22, BS '20 Chemsitry, pursuing phd at Wash U
    (DDIL married #3 in 2020, MPOA grad, BA '20 philosophy, pusrsing phd at SLU)
    DS, 20, Physics major
    DD, 17, dyslexic, 11th grade customizednMP plus co-op
    DS, 13, future engineer/scientist/ world conquerer 8A
    DD, 7 , 1ST Future astronaut, robot building space artist

    Comment


      #3
      I’ll let Paul discuss MPOA policy. I just want to point out a few things to keep in mind. By doing as you say, you are graduating your student at the age of a typical sophomore- 15/16 and then sending them to community college as a full time college student. There are often advantages to not graduating early. One is that in many states, dual enrollment is free or reduced in cost. You can’t dual enroll if you have already earned a diploma. The other is earning scholarships to four year universities. Often the best scholarships are for incoming freshmen. There are scholarships for transfer students, but they often aren’t as big. Many colleges will count a graduating senior as a freshmen even if they have some dual enroll credits, but if a student graduated with a diploma at age 15/16 and then did two full years of community as an already graduated student then they would be considered a transfer student. Now, all this varies by state and college so just keep it in mind. It may or may not apply to you.
      i have had three of my six (so far) take algebra 1 in 7th. Two took AP calculus in 11th (the other is only in 8th) and then one dual enrolled in CC in 12th to take calculus 3. That son also took Classical 1-2 in 7th and 8th. There are still plenty more high school classes to take to fill up 11-12th. In our case, our state doesn’t offer free dual enrollment so I had no incentive to dual enroll. I placed more value on getting in two more years of Christian classical education before I threw them to the wolves of public university. In my area, community college is just glorified public school. All the reasons we choose to homeschool rather than go to public school applied to grades 13-14 (as I think of community college). True- they do get actual college credit which can reduce time and costs at university. But often students can get an almost full ride to a state school so money may not be a big deal. For us the value of getting two years of an advanced Christian education was more valuable than going to a public community college those two years.
      consider classical studies- if you do CS 1 and 2 in 7th and 8th, you then have four more years to do CS 3,4,5 and (shout out to Paul! Hopefully 6!!!) in the next four years. You wouldn’t have time for all that in just two years. Same with literature and history- you’d miss out in half of the good things that MPOA offers.
      For sure consider taking MPOA classes starting in 7th, just think about all the nuances of actually getting that diploma four years later (after grade 10) verses staying in high school, dual enrolling in the advanced math and science you need and maybe a comp or history class while not actually graduating till 12th and then entering university as an incoming freshmen rather than a transfer student.
      Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
      DD, 26, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
      DS, 24, BS '18 mechanical engineering
      DS, 22, BS '20 Chemsitry, pursuing phd at Wash U
      (DDIL married #3 in 2020, MPOA grad, BA '20 philosophy, pusrsing phd at SLU)
      DS, 20, Physics major
      DD, 17, dyslexic, 11th grade customizednMP plus co-op
      DS, 13, future engineer/scientist/ world conquerer 8A
      DD, 7 , 1ST Future astronaut, robot building space artist

      Comment


        #4
        Thanks for your input, Debbie. Those are definitely things to think about. I came to the forum looking for answers to a similar question. I have two boys only a year apart. Currently they are finishing 6th and 7th grades, so will be in 7th and 8th next year. I have a year to think about it, but considering the diploma program. It could work nicely for the older one. The problem I have is with the younger one. Since we started out homeschooling and doing many classes together, they are on the same level in nearly everything except composition and math! Actually, the younger boy often excels over the older one even though he is not "supposed" to be doing that level of work. So, it is looking like I will also have to make the choice as to whether the younger one could graduate a year early from HS or wait. As I map out the MPOA classes, though, looking at the diploma program, we "run out" of options for that 12th grade year if I keep him from graduating early. That is, if he continues on his current trajectory, he may not be able to take 5 MPOA classes that year and also dual enroll at a local college. In that case, could MPOA issue a diploma based on his grades 8-11, but just issue it after he is finished with grade 12 even though he may not enroll in 5 online classes that year? Does any of this make sense?

        Second question - I have heard that the diploma program students get "priority registration." Is this the case? I am worried that if we don't enroll in the diploma program that we will end up not being able to get the classes we need if they are full of kids that did enroll.

        Hopefully Paul can reply to some of these questions. I have a year to consider, but just thinking ahead!

        Thanks!

        Nicole - mom - Doctor of Pharmacy, UMKC 2002, M.S. Bioethics, 2020, Univ. of Mary.
        2020/2021 - 4th year homeschooling and with MP
        DS - 7th
        DS - 6th

        Comment


          #5
          Nikkirxd I've often asked myself, what is the meaning of "grade" for a homeschooled student? We can be in quite a gray area there. Our situation is basically the same: I have two children barely a year apart, and in time we reached the point when they started doing the exact same things. So basically the younger is already in high school, and like you I wonder what her graduation date should be - lots of things to consider. With her MPOA classes I simply go by skill: if she were in our local public school she would be in 8th grade, but she's taking Introductory Physics right now (she did Algebra I in "7th grade" at home) which should technically be out of her reach. But why should I consider her in 8th grade simply because that's what our public school system would say? Different places have different criteria, and private schools aren't even bound by public schools criteria, so in the end it's all quite relative. For me it's easy because I am not compelled to specify a grade in my state (Virginia). So I just kick the can down the road I did conclude that the Diploma program was not going to be the solution for us... even though it would have saved us a ton of money!
          DS (15)
          DD (14)
          DS (7)

          Comment


            #6
            Mrs Bee Thanks. Sounds like a very familiar situation! Yeah, I'm in that process of trying to determine whether the diploma program will work for us or not. I "could" squeeze into it without too many changes, but it would sure be "easier" if I kept them in the same classes for history / Logic / literature / science. Even if the classes are online, Mom still has to keep up, so the fewer to keep up with each year the better! Ha! Thanks for all your help!
            Nicole - mom - Doctor of Pharmacy, UMKC 2002, M.S. Bioethics, 2020, Univ. of Mary.
            2020/2021 - 4th year homeschooling and with MP
            DS - 7th
            DS - 6th

            Comment


              #7
              Lots of questions here for me to answer! I'm going to try to synthesize the questions below and include answers:
              1. Can students younger than 14 enter the diploma program? Yes, but we often suggest waiting. Debbie has laid out a lot of good reasons why but we would also include that maturity is a big factor. Our high school courses can deal with adult themes (think "The Scarlet Letter" et al.) and a high level of personal responsibility is required of the students. Those are both additional good reasons to wait.
              2. What about graduating early, dual credit, AP classes, etc? I'm hoping to move to dual enrollment courses at MPOA where we will partner with a university that allows us to dictate and teach the class but students will get college credit for them. I'm hoping to make progress in that direction for 2022.
              3. What if we run out of courses to take in 12th grade? If it genuinely happens (as it was happening before we had Calculus and other high level courses), we will work with you to do 3 or 4 classes with us in that senior year. However, we are continuing to roll out more advanced classes so this issue should disappear.
              4. Do diploma registrants get advanced registration? This year I did email diploma students that registration was open before anyone else. Next year how we give them priority registration will probably change but as we are requiring them to make 5+ classes with us work, they need their pick of a schedule.

              Peace,
              Paul
              Paul Schaeffer
              --
              Academy Director
              Memoria Press Online Academy

              Comment


                #8
                Thanks pschaeffer . That clears some thing up.
                Nicole - mom - Doctor of Pharmacy, UMKC 2002, M.S. Bioethics, 2020, Univ. of Mary.
                2020/2021 - 4th year homeschooling and with MP
                DS - 7th
                DS - 6th

                Comment

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