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    Book Recommendations

    What are your favorite books on classical education?
    DS, 13, 8th grade
    DS, 10, 5th grade

    #2
    Re: Book Recommendations

    This is going to be an oversimplification because I have a teetering nightstand full of books that fit this description, but I'm rereading Climbing Parnassus and cannot recommend it enough. What a journey through history! What an inspiring vision! What a needed kick in the pants! Ha!

    I'm sure I'll add more titles later, but this one is a great place to start to get the vision of "Why Latin and Greek?"
    Festina lentē,
    Jessica P

    SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
    @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
    S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
    D · 8th
    D · 5th
    S · 2nd

    Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Book Recommendations

      Originally posted by pickandgrin View Post
      This is going to be an oversimplification because I have a teetering nightstand full of books that fit this description, but I'm rereading Climbing Parnassus and cannot recommend it enough. What a journey through history! What an inspiring vision! What a needed kick in the pants! Ha!

      I'm sure I'll add more titles later, but this one is a great place to start to get the vision of "Why Latin and Greek?"
      Oh yes, that is a great one, one of the few on the subject I've actually read. Every time I contemplate quitting teaching Latin, I have to think about that book. It keeps me going!
      DS, 13, 8th grade
      DS, 10, 5th grade

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Book Recommendations

        Sugarbelle,
        Maybe you should kick us off with your favorites as well! My copy of CP I bought used in 2013 and I wrote in the front cover that I had already read it twice from our public library (because I write weird things like that in the front of my books). However, there's no chance I recognized the majority of names and books references in it way back then. I'm only just now putting some of the dots together. All these years later I actually own some of the books he quotes! Now, to get those read, too.
        Festina lentē,
        Jessica P

        SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
        @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
        S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
        D · 8th
        D · 5th
        S · 2nd

        Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Book Recommendations

          Originally posted by pickandgrin View Post
          Sugarbelle,
          Maybe you should kick us off with your favorites as well! My copy of CP I bought used in 2013 and I wrote in the front cover that I had already read it twice from our public library (because I write weird things like that in the front of my books). However, there's no chance I recognized the majority of names and books references in it way back then. I'm only just now putting some of the dots together. All these years later I actually own some of the books he quotes! Now, to get those read, too.
          Sure. Here's my short list, literally. Consider This is my favorite.

          Climbing Parnassus
          Consider This
          For the Children's Sake
          The Well-Trained Mind

          I've also read Teaching from Rest, which I detested. I'm probably an oddball with my opinion of that book since most people seem to love it, but I really hated it, so much so that I reviewed it on amazon, which is something I never bother doing.
          Last edited by Sugarbelle; 04-24-2018, 09:13 PM.
          DS, 13, 8th grade
          DS, 10, 5th grade

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Book Recommendations

            Sugarbelle,

            Since you were comfortable sharing that you detested Teaching from Rest (kudos to you for being honest), I will share that I 'detested' Climbing Parnassus. There are 2 times in my adult Christian life I have thrown a book across the room:

            1) The Shack (I had to read it to understand what all the hype was about, and found myself so offended and grieving for my Lord that this book would sell millions of copies. And to think it was made into a movie! Lord have mercy!)
            2) Climbing Parnassus (Why? It's secular! I slugged my way through it and, thankfully, was content to let it settle at the bottom of my list of recommended books on classical education because I would never separate a defense for a classical education from the LOGOS, the Christ, the unifying principle of all things. Nor would I recommend a book on classical education that admits a classical education is for above average students.) Sorry, Jessica, to be a contrarian.

            So my recommendations would be these:

            1) The Bible
            2) After that, a deep understanding of a Genesis 3 vs. Genesis 2 view of man (with a diversion upon a path of reading/understanding Pope John Paul II's 'Theology of the Body' for an enhancement of one's understanding of Imago Dei and personhood.)
            3) After the above two, a reading on the life, especially the education, of Helen Keller (she received a classical education in spite of being deaf and blind BECAUSE a woman believed she saw the Imago Dei in Helen.)
            4) Then, after the above 3, read Cheryl Swope's book Simply Classical - Why? To understand classical education is for ALL students regardless of aptitude. Why? Because all persons are made in the image of God and we teach to that image in faith.[I]
            5) Then, if you have the time for more meat, I'd dig into Stratford Caldecott's works (Beauty in the Word, Beauty for Truth's Sake)
            6) Finally, if you plan to ever mix and mingle with Circe types, or attend any of their conferences and hope all doesn't completely go over your head.....then go ahead and read Norms and Nobility.

            A classical (Christian) education ought to be pursued with this goal in mind: "A cultivation of wisdom and virtue by nourishing the soul on the true, good and beautiful by means of the seven liberating arts." There's no way to do this without starting with Christ as the 'wisdom' and 'virtue'. (1 Corinthians)

            SusanP in VA
            Last edited by SPearson; 04-24-2018, 09:44 PM.

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Book Recommendations

              You guys have already mentioned my favorites (and a couple that I am not crazy about, but keeping that to myself) but I will also add just about anything by Mortimer Adler is great too. His Paideia Proposal is short, and includes a great rundown on content styles/teaching approaches. I have his Great Ideas our from the library right now, and unfortunately am not going to get to renew it enough to finish it! Guess it’s off to abebooks to look for it...

              In addition to books specifically about classical ed, I would also recommend simply digging in and reading some classical works! Even if your kids are not there yet, get the Iliad set, the Odyssey set, Aeneid, Dante, Augustine’s City if God, etc. Start out on your own path of reading, and these works themselves will start to convince you of the merits of classical ed. Or get yourself some Latin materials and start learning it yourself. It seems like it would take “so much time” but it really doesn’t if you set a time to do it and stick with it. (Even if you have to stop during busy seasons and pick it back up during slower ones!). Some of us here are S...L...O...W...L....Y plodding through it, but as long as it is on MY shelf too, I am *still* working on it!

              AMDG,
              Sarah
              2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
              DD, 18, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
              DS, 16
              DD, 14
              DD, 12
              DD, 10
              DD, 7.5
              DD, 5.5
              +DS+
              DS, 18 months

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Book Recommendations

                Originally posted by SPearson View Post
                Sugarbelle,

                Since you were comfortable sharing that you detested Teaching from Rest (kudos to you for being honest), I will share that I 'detested' Climbing Parnassus. There are 2 times in my adult Christian life I have thrown a book across the room:

                1) The Shack (I had to read it to understand what all the hype was about, and found myself so offended and grieving for my Lord that this book would sell millions of copies. And to think it was made into a movie! Lord have mercy!)
                2) Climbing Parnassus (Why? It's secular! I slugged my way through it and, thankfully, was content to let it settle at the bottom of my list of recommended books on classical education because I would never separate a defense for a classical education from the LOGOS, the Christ, the unifying principle of all things. Nor would I recommend a book on classical education that admits a classical education is for above average students.) Sorry, Jessica, to be a contrarian.

                So my recommendations would be these:

                1) The Bible
                2) After that, a deep understanding of a Genesis 3 vs. Genesis 2 view of man (with a diversion upon a path of reading/understanding Pope John Paul II's 'Theology of the Body' for an enhancement of one's understanding of Imago Dei and personhood.)
                3) After the above two, a reading on the life, especially the education, of Helen Keller (she received a classical education in spite of being deaf and blind BECAUSE a woman believed she saw the Imago Dei in Helen.)
                4) Then, after the above 3, read Cheryl Swope's book Simply Classical - Why? To understand classical education is for ALL students regardless of aptitude. Why? Because all persons are made in the image of God and we teach to that image in faith.[I]
                5) Then, if you have the time for more meat, I'd dig into Stratford Caldecott's works (Beauty in the Word, Beauty for Truth's Sake)
                6) Finally, if you plan to ever mix and mingle with Circe types, or attend any of their conferences and hope all doesn't completely go over your head.....then go ahead and read Norms and Nobility.

                A classical (Christian) education ought to be pursued with this goal in mind: "A cultivation of wisdom and virtue by nourishing the soul on the true, good and beautiful by means of the seven liberating arts." There's no way to do this without starting with Christ as the 'wisdom' and 'virtue'. (1 Corinthians)

                SusanP in VA
                Thank you for sharing your honest thoughts. Do have a favorite book on Helen Keller you can recommend?

                I never read The Shack, but my husband did to find out what all the hysteria was about. He thought it was a heretical bunch of rubbish.
                DS, 13, 8th grade
                DS, 10, 5th grade

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Book Recommendations

                  Here is a helpful and extensive list from a recent CLSA webinar that Martin Cothran gave for schools. Included are classical books, books about classical education, as well as other helpful books.

                  Accessible books about classical education:
                  The Schools We Need and Why We Don't Have Them Hirsch
                  Great Ideas from Great Books Adler
                  Climbing Parnassus Simmons
                  A Defense of Latin & Classical Education Cheryl Lowe
                  What is Classical Education? an MP pamphlet by Martin Cothran (I believe it's based around this article.)

                  Deeper books on classical education:
                  Paideia: The Ideals of Greek Culture Jaeger, 3 vol. set, vol 1 in particular
                  Education in Antiquity Marrou
                  A Defense o Classical Education Livingstone
                  The War Against Grammar Mulroy
                  From Achilles to Christ Markos
                  Passion of the Western Mind Tarnas
                  Hard Times Dickens
                  Simply Classical Swope
                  Norms and Nobility Hicks

                  Classical books
                  Iliad & Odyssey Homer
                  Aeneid Virgil
                  Divine Comedy Dante
                  KJV Bible
                  Shakespeare's plays

                  Eleven Classic Christian Novels
                  Anna Karenina & War & Peace Tolstoy
                  Lord of the Rings Tolkien
                  The Talisman Sir Walter Scott
                  The Brothers Karamazov Dostoyevsky
                  The Count of Monte Cristo Dumas
                  The Human Comedy de Balzac
                  Kristin Lavransdatter Undset
                  Les Miserables Hugo
                  Bleak House Dickens

                  Non-fiction
                  Orthodoxy Chesterton
                  Mere Christianity Lewis
                  Fundamentals fo the Faith Kreeft
                  City of God Augustine
                  Story of Christianity Hart
                  Summa Theologica Aquinas

                  Modern Christian Novels
                  The Violent Bear it Away O'Connor
                  Love in the Ruins & The Thanatos Syndrome Percy
                  Cry the Beloved Country Paton
                  Jayber Crow Berry
                  Brideshead Revisited Waugh
                  The End of the Affair Greene

                  Other Helpful Books
                  all of Dickens
                  Amusing Ourselves to Death & Technopoly Postman
                  Socrates Meets Jesus (and other Socrates Meets... books) Kreeft
                  Death of the Soul Barrett
                  Aristotle for Everybody Adler
                  Why Knowledge Matters Hirsch, Jr.
                  Preface to Paradise Lost Lewis


                  Also mentioned was a List of Great Book Lists:
                  Adler's List of Great Books
                  Alder's Short List of Great Books
                  C. S. Lewis' List of Great Books
                  Peter Kreeft's List of Great Books
                  Last edited by pickandgrin; 04-25-2018, 10:42 AM.
                  Festina lentē,
                  Jessica P

                  SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
                  @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
                  S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
                  D · 8th
                  D · 5th
                  S · 2nd

                  Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Book Recommendations

                    Originally posted by KF2000 View Post
                    You guys have already mentioned my favorites (and a couple that I am not crazy about, but keeping that to myself) but I will also add just about anything by Mortimer Adler is great too. His Paideia Proposal is short, and includes a great rundown on content styles/teaching approaches. I have his Great Ideas our from the library right now, and unfortunately am not going to get to renew it enough to finish it! Guess it’s off to abebooks to look for it...

                    In addition to books specifically about classical ed, I would also recommend simply digging in and reading some classical works! Even if your kids are not there yet, get the Iliad set, the Odyssey set, Aeneid, Dante, Augustine’s City if God, etc. Start out on your own path of reading, and these works themselves will start to convince you of the merits of classical ed. Or get yourself some Latin materials and start learning it yourself. It seems like it would take “so much time” but it really doesn’t if you set a time to do it and stick with it. (Even if you have to stop during busy seasons and pick it back up during slower ones!). Some of us here are S...L...O...W...L....Y plodding through it, but as long as it is on MY shelf too, I am *still* working on it!

                    AMDG,
                    Sarah
                    Thank you, Sarah. We have a number of versions of the Iliad and the Odyssey, but so far I have only read The Trojan War. This summer I plan to read those that are required for 8th grade so I'm prepared to discuss them with my son. I guess I'll work my way up with my children. I'll eventually be classically educated!
                    DS, 13, 8th grade
                    DS, 10, 5th grade

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Book Recommendations

                      Thank you so much, Jessica! I've read a number of those titles, so I guess I'm not doing too badly. What is CLSA?
                      DS, 13, 8th grade
                      DS, 10, 5th grade

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Book Recommendations

                        Originally posted by Sugarbelle View Post
                        Thank you so much, Jessica! I've read a number of those titles, so I guess I'm not doing too badly. What is CLSA?
                        What a great feeling! It takes time, but you do make your way.

                        CLSA is the Classical Latin School Association, a membership, consulting, and accrediting association for classical Christian schools. Our cottage school is a member. You can visit them at www.classicallatin.org.

                        By the way on Iliad and Odyssey, remember that you can listen to them on audio!
                        Last edited by pickandgrin; 04-25-2018, 12:43 PM.
                        Festina lentē,
                        Jessica P

                        SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
                        @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
                        S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
                        D · 8th
                        D · 5th
                        S · 2nd

                        Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: Book Recommendations

                          I would add:
                          The Liberal Arts Tradition by Jain and Clark
                          And
                          Teaching the Trivium by the Bluedorns

                          TtT is from...maybe the beginning of the CCE movement, mid-nineties? I don't have it easy to get to right now. That's how I first caught the vision for more than a utilitarian education.
                          LAT is much more recent.

                          I am working my way now through Richard Gamble's The Great Tradition. (Mary, by that I mean it is teetering on the top of the stack on my nightstand)
                          2018-19:
                          Daughter 5M
                          Daughter 3A
                          Son SC C

                          HighlandsLatin.org/Bentonville

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: Book Recommendations

                            Originally posted by whippoorwill View Post
                            I would add:
                            The Liberal Arts Tradition by Jain and Clark
                            And
                            Teaching the Trivium by the Bluedorns

                            TtT is from...maybe the beginning of the CCE movement, mid-nineties? I don't have it easy to get to right now. That's how I first caught the vision for more than a utilitarian education.
                            LAT is much more recent.

                            I am working my way now through Richard Gamble's The Great Tradition. (Mary, by that I mean it is teetering on the top of the stack on my nightstand)
                            Thank you. LAT has been in my amazon cart for a while, but I just haven't purchased it yet. There are so many to choose from!
                            DS, 13, 8th grade
                            DS, 10, 5th grade

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Re: Book Recommendations

                              Originally posted by pickandgrin View Post
                              Here is a helpful and extensive list from a recent CLSA webinar that Martin Cothran gave for schools. Included are classical books, books about classical education, as well as other helpful books.

                              Accessible books about classical education:
                              The Schools We Need and Why We Don't Have Them Hirsch
                              Great Ideas from Great Books Adler
                              Climbing Parnassus Simmons
                              A Defense of Latin & Classical Education Cheryl Lowe
                              What is Classical Education? an MP pamphlet by Martin Cothran (I believe it's based around this article.)

                              Deeper books on classical education:
                              Paideia: The Ideals of Greek Culture Jaeger, 3 vol. set, vol 1 in particular
                              Education in Antiquity Marrou
                              A Defense o Classical Education Livingstone
                              The War Against Grammar Mulroy
                              From Achilles to Christ Markos
                              Passion of the Western Mind Tarnas
                              Hard Times Dickens
                              Simply Classical Swope
                              Norms and Nobility Hicks

                              Classical books
                              Iliad & Odyssey Homer
                              Aeneid Virgil
                              Divine Comedy Dante
                              KJV Bible
                              Shakespeare's plays

                              Eleven Classic Christian Novels
                              Anna Karenina & War & Peace Tolstoy
                              Lord of the Rings Tolkien
                              The Talisman Sir Walter Scott
                              The Brothers Karamazov Dostoyevsky
                              The Count of Monte Cristo Dumas
                              The Human Comedy de Balzac
                              Kristin Lavransdatter Undset
                              Les Miserables Hugo
                              Bleak House Dickens

                              Non-fiction
                              Orthodoxy Chesterton
                              Mere Christianity Lewis
                              Fundamentals fo the Faith Kreeft
                              City of God Augustine
                              Story of Christianity Hart
                              Summa Theologica Aquinas

                              Modern Christian Novels
                              The Violent Bear it Away O'Connor
                              Love in the Ruins & The Thanatos Syndrome Percy
                              Cry the Beloved Country Paton
                              Jayber Crow Berry
                              Brideshead Revisited Waugh
                              The End of the Affair Greene

                              Other Helpful Books
                              all of Dickens
                              Amusing Ourselves to Death & Technopoly Postman
                              Socrates Meets Jesus (and other Socrates Meets... books) Kreeft
                              Death of the Soul Barrett
                              Aristotle for Everybody Adler
                              Why Knowledge Matters Hirsch, Jr.
                              Preface to Paradise Lost Lewis


                              Also mentioned was a List of Great Book Lists:
                              Adler's List of Great Books
                              Alder's Short List of Great Books
                              C. S. Lewis' List of Great Books
                              Peter Kreeft's List of Great Books
                              OOOh! I'm so glad you posted these! I lost my notes.
                              Plans for 2019-20

                              DD1 - 24 - College Grad and rocking her own bakery business
                              DD2 - 13 - 8A Louisville HLS Cottage School and MPOA
                              DS3 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
                              DS4 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
                              DD5 - 7 - MP2, Louisville HLS Cottage School
                              DS6 - 5 - MP K

                              [url]www.thekennedyadventures.com/all-about-our-memoria-press-homeschool[/url]

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