Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The case for Literature Guides?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #61
    Christine,

    The pre-reading phonetic work is key. Maybe you could have parents cover this prior to the class. This way when you get together, do a quick re-read of the literature words, not necessarily the phonics flashcards as those should be included in the pre-reading work. Since the decoding of the pronounce and say words as well as the additional literature guide words should be gone over before as well, this quick read-through should only take about 5 minutes. Spend the majority of your time reading then do a few comprehension questions as outlined in the TG.

    This way you have the words syllabicated on the board already if there are problems decoding. You might also consider having some flashcards there for introduction or review of advanced phonograms that you know will need reinforced and seen in isolation.

    By having the parents cover the pre-reading with their child rather than everyone doing their own thing you can be assured the phonics needed for that day's reading is being covered well so rather just studying phonics- the phonics has an immediate purpose and built in practice. This allows everyone to be ready for the days lesson as well!

    Blessings,

    Comment


      #62
      Michelle and Tanya, thank you. I am learning so much from both of you.

      I am working this out right now in my small group of 1st graders, and just when I think I've got it, I have another question. I hope you don't mind? Again, I'm transitioning from a one-to-one homeschool situation to a traditional classroom.

      1. During your read-aloud times, how long do you aim to have one student reading? And while that student is reading and being coached, what is your strategy for managing the other students who are waiting?

      2. Can you explain your methods for using the flashcards in the classroom? I've been pulling out the ones related to the lesson, saying the sound "/ou/ says ow like round", having the student repeat back, and then flipping the card and having them read the example words individually--each student reading a word and working around the room. I also keep a section of cards highlighted in previous lessons and will review at least some of them every day in the same manner. However, I'm not really sure how the cards are intended to be used for instruction, so I'm kind of winging it!

      3. Do the flashcards happen to come with a "quick reference" list, where I could see a list of all the phonograms and words, in order and numbered, on one sheet? Sometimes I feel so awkward looking for the right card. I always pull out the cards needed for the lesson ahead of time, but sometimes I'd like to be able to pull a card on demand, like in your example above with the word "trouble", or if I'm putting together my own pre-reading checklist for a book that does not have a literature guide.

      Thank you again!
      Shawna

      Comment


        #63
        I'm working through the study guides for 2nd grade with my son who has some reading challenges (he sounds like he reads well, but doesn't retain what he reads). I've started doing this and it has helped a lot.

        Day 1 - I read it completely, commenting on some things. Then I make him read it quietly. (I read much faster, so it doesn't take that long). That same day, I make him quietly move his finger along the words and read (or at least, he pretends to). We do vocabulary.
        Day 2 - i make him read it out loud to me. Then we do a few comprehension questions.
        Day 3 - I bought the book on Audible.com. I give him headphones and have him listen to someone else read it while I keep an eye out to make sure he's following along with his finger. (This started with The Courage of Sarah Noble) I think having a different voice besides mine might help him pull more out of it. He's able to answer more of the questions with independent answers that I'm not having to really help with.

        The Audible.com is really helping as a final reading. Looking ahead, I see that The Little House is also on Audible. I imagine most of the books from now on are. I will probably keep with this pattern because it seems to be working well for the literature and his comprehension.
        Melissa

        DS (MP3) - 9
        DS (MP2) - 7/8
        DS (K) - 6
        DD (Adorable distraction) 2 1/2

        Comment


          #64
          Shawna,

          1. Gauge the time a student reads aloud to his stamina. A student who frequently struggles with decoding will not benefit from reading an entire chapter. We typically switch after each paragraph but students may get several turns. Everyone should have their finger on the spot and be following along in their book. By switching after each paragraph keeping students engaged is easier. Students are watching for any words covered in the phonic lessons prior to reading. This activity also helps keep attention.
          2. Flashcards that are used for the literature lessons can be introduced during the morning calendar time or other morning activity. Show a card, ask if anyone knows the sound, say the sound aloud with the clue picture (ex. ou as in round), have students repeat the sound. Introduce next card. Then go through the stack showing the card and having class say sound/clue picture. If class gets stuck on a card just tell them, have them repeat and move on. Go through the stack a couple of times. FOR SPELLING: pull the designated cards. Introduce in the same manner but keep these on display for the week as they are the phonograms used in conjunction with the phonics for mastery.
          3. There not one currently available but I will put it on my list.

          MBentley,

          By second grade the reading selections become lengthier. Sounds like you have a system that works for you. My only comment would be to remember you have one student rather than a class of 18. Our reading sections are completed by classes. You might consider taking turns by paragraph if shorter segments of reading are needed or page by page if your students is willing able to read that long and maintain comprehension.

          Blessings,

          Comment


            #65
            Thank you, Michelle! Very helpful as always. And I don't want to put another thing on your list! Maybe I'll make a reference list and send you a copy!

            Comment


              #66
              You are welcome, Shawna!

              Comment


                #67
                Originally posted by Emilylovesbooks View Post
                Re: The case for Literature Guides?

                I feel the same way as the OP, no matter how many threads I’ve read or participated in about the guides! I just sense that having to go through it formally does take away some of the joy of reading, especially for little ones. I realize this isn’t how everyone experiences it! And the reading it three times sounds so unappealing. I’m just not convinced that the academic value gained in three readings or even two is worth leaving them not enjoying the reading experience as much. Maybe I’ll change my mind!
                I can see this. We are new to MP and I was hesitant to use the literature guides for fear of killing the love of reading. For this reason, I have explained to my kids that we are going to be working through 4 books per year - only four - in this way. We will read the books slowly, carefully, and purposefully in order to learn how to really read and appreciate great books. We reserve such analysis to ONLY those four books and often have two or more other "fun" read-alouds happening at the same time. I also allow my kids to have full say (within reason, of course, based on appropriate content ) in what they read for fun on their own. The reading the selections three times is new to me and I am not sure how we will go about this yet. I need to ponder and digest...

                -Christina
                - Christina :)

                DD (11) - Grade 6 Core
                DS (9) - Grade 4 Core
                DS (7) - Grade 1 Core

                Comment


                  #68
                  Originally posted by ChristinaC View Post

                  The reading the selections three times is new to me and I am not sure how we will go about this yet. I need to ponder and digest...

                  -Christina
                  We often enjoy listening to the audiobook as one of our readings. I am surprised at how a different voice can give a new perspective to a text.
                  Heidi

                  2018-19
                  dd- 3m
                  ds- SC 1
                  dd- SC B

                  Comment


                    #69
                    Originally posted by ChristinaC View Post

                    I can see this. We are new to MP and I was hesitant to use the literature guides for fear of killing the love of reading. For this reason, I have explained to my kids that we are going to be working through 4 books per year - only four - in this way. We will read the books slowly, carefully, and purposefully in order to learn how to really read and appreciate great books. We reserve such analysis to ONLY those four books and often have two or more other "fun" read-alouds happening at the same time. I also allow my kids to have full say (within reason, of course, based on appropriate content ) in what they read for fun on their own. The reading the selections three times is new to me and I am not sure how we will go about this yet. I need to ponder and digest...

                    -Christina
                    Christina,
                    You know, kids are funny. Because the concern you bring up here, if asked, my kids would probably have a knee-jerk reaction of "YES! It takes the fun out of it to go so slowly and fill in the guides." They are kids, after all, and they will go by their first reaction to work - which is dislike. But as soon as they all start complaining, they will bring up specific examples from books they have all done - "remember THIS from THIS book?" And that leads them to continue on into a lengthy discussion about stuff they have all read. They very soon forget that what started the conversation was a complaint about their school work. But I know that the reason they are able to have this sort of conversation is because they have been trained by their guides to have this sort of conversation! They have become thoughtful, argumentative readers and I know it is from the progress they have made through their literature guides. It is hard to see when your kids are new at it, or when your oldest is only in grammar school. But as time goes by, and as your children get older, the value of the gradual training in this becomes a lot easier to see. And your point about the number of books we use each year is spot on - my kids are constantly reading in their spare time. If we were to work it out proportionally, the number of books we "study" is ridiculously small!

                    AMDG,
                    Sarah
                    2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
                    DD, 18, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
                    DS, 16
                    DD, 14
                    DD, 12
                    DD, 10
                    DD, 7.5
                    DD, 5.5
                    +DS+
                    DS, 18 months

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X