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    #46
    Originally posted by 2Muchfun View Post
    Thank you SO much!!! I’ve had to cut back for financial reasons and I wanted to be sure!! Thank you very much for your very prompt answers!!
    A trick for times when money is tight: purchase the teacher's guide. You can discuss things orally but, you can also ask the questions you do want written answers for and your child can write them down on notebook paper. Not ideal, but it gives you options!
    Jennifer


    2018-2019
    DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
    DS-12 (6M)
    DS-10 (SC3)
    DD-8 (MP2)
    DD-6 (SC2)
    DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

    Comment


      #47
      One skill gained by using the literature guides is how to form a "good sentence." We think this is a simple task, but that is not the case. Yes, students are imaginative and can give detailed, oral answers to a comprehension question, but being able to condense or exapand a thought that answers a question and write it down, using correct capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and spelling is not easily done. That is why we model it for 2 to 3 years within our literature program. This period of modeling is a pillar of our suggested pedagogy key to the transition to independence in grammar school. If money is an issue, purchasing only the Teacher's Guide, for the primary level literature to ensure you get the phonics information and having your child write on lined paper, is a good option.

      Blessings,
      Michelle T

      Comment


        #48
        Thank you!! My daughter writes behind her age so I’m not worried about full sentences, at all!! As a matter of fact she leaves me notes around the house asking me for things! she calls them Notey Notes! I get what you are saying and appreciate the help.

        Comment


          #49
          We read Peter Cottontail today (second grade literature). The enrichment activity was to retell the plot of the story. My DD retold the story, no issues.

          Hours later, as I was washing the supper dishes, I was invited to a puppet show. Daughter had created a puppet theater complete with Mr. McGregor and Peter. She proceeded to retell the whole story with inflection and vocabulary words. Ha!

          This is why I love MP literature and the corresponding guides. The quantity of books is not overwhelming; students spend time with the literature. Reading is not a race with MP. There's no awards or expectation to read through a huge pile of books.

          My daughter enjoyed reading through Peter's misadventure, learning some new vocabulary, and interacting with the story. She had time and interest to go above and beyond the requirement.

          Two thumbs up MP!

          (I tried to attach a picture of her puppet show, but I get an error message saying it's too large a file. Any suggestions?)
          Last edited by Colomama; 01-19-2019, 12:26 AM.
          Married to DH for 13 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

          DS10- Simply Classical 4 / Grade 3 Classic Core,
          DD8- Grade 2 Classic Core,
          DD 6- Classic Core Kindergarten

          Comment


            #50
            Colomama,

            I can't help with your file size, but I love this post! It is so rewarding when students embrace the curriculum and make it their own. You can see the wheels turning as their school experience becomes part of their lives. Ultimately, that reward will be their embrace of truth, goodness, and beauty.

            Tanya

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              #51
              Originally posted by Colomama View Post
              (I tried to attach a picture of her puppet show, but I get an error message saying it's too large a file. Any suggestions?)
              You can shrink the file easily here:
              https://tinypng.com/

              You might have to run it through a few times, but it should work.
              DD #1 : 23, college GRADUATE
              DD #2 : 12 MP 7A - HLS Cottage School Louisville, MPOA
              DS #3 : 10, MP3M+Simply Classical4; HLS Cottage School Louisville
              DS #4 : 10, MP3M+Simply Classical4; HLS Cottage School Louisville
              DD #5: 6, MP 1 at HLS
              DS #6: 4, cutest caboose on the loose
              http://www.thekennedyadventures.com

              Comment


                #52
                Thanks Dianna! That worked like a charm.

                Here is Mr. McGregor with his yellow straw hat on the left and Peter on the right getting into mischief.
                Attached Files
                Married to DH for 13 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

                DS10- Simply Classical 4 / Grade 3 Classic Core,
                DD8- Grade 2 Classic Core,
                DD 6- Classic Core Kindergarten

                Comment


                  #53
                  Hi Michelle! Thank you for the tips on reading when using the lit guides. For the 1st/2nd graders, how many students are you working with in a group when you are having them read aloud the selections? Would you mind share how you divide up the reading among the students to keep things moving? Are they sitting at desks, facing the front of the room, or are you working around a small table like "guided reading" style? Thanks for your help! Just trying to visualize this.

                  Comment


                    #54
                    Shawna,

                    For the grades you mentioned, our classrooms have anywhere from 15 to 21 students. All desks face the focal point of the room which is the teacher/ whiteboard. When it is time to read, everyone gets out their book and is following along as each reads aloud when called upon in turn. Sometimes they sit at their desks to read and sometimes they sit in a circle on the floor.

                    The teacher typically has her class chart ready to give a daily reading grade (+,-, or check)and draws a students name on a popsicle stick or calls a name. The student reads a paragraph or until the teacher says stop. Any decoding issues are worked through coaching style and students are encouraged to read with fluency and expression.

                    No groups. Whole class instruction from the pre-reading vocabulary introduction and phonic work to the post reading comprehension questions is teacher led. We do suggest some modifications for students with diagnosed reading issues such as assigning their oral reading section the day before allowing the student to practice their section or to have that student team read with the teacher or classmate.

                    Blessings,

                    Comment


                      #55
                      Ah...I see it now. Thank you! I think I need to be a note-taking fly on the wall on your classrooms. So much of teaching is management. I was trained in a student-centric public school classroom, then spent many years around my kitchen table and on the couch as a homeschooling mom, and grew more classical as the years went by. Now that I am re-entering the hybrid-homeschooling world and working with a group of children, I find there is so much I must learn again.

                      Comment


                        #56
                        Originally posted by Michelle T View Post
                        Shawna,

                        For the grades you mentioned, our classrooms have anywhere from 15 to 21 students. All desks face the focal point of the room which is the teacher/ whiteboard. When it is time to read, everyone gets out their book and is following along as each reads aloud when called upon in turn. Sometimes they sit at their desks to read and sometimes they sit in a circle on the floor.

                        The teacher typically has her class chart ready to give a daily reading grade (+,-, or check)and draws a students name on a popsicle stick or calls a name. The student reads a paragraph or until the teacher says stop. Any decoding issues are worked through coaching style and students are encouraged to read with fluency and expression.

                        No groups. Whole class instruction from the pre-reading vocabulary introduction and phonic work to the post reading comprehension questions is teacher led. We do suggest some modifications for students with diagnosed reading issues such as assigning their oral reading section the day before allowing the student to practice their section or to have that student team read with the teacher or classmate.

                        Blessings,
                        Can you describe the “coaching” process? I am working with 3 girls. Two of the girls tend to run right over punctuation. Also, what do you do when a child mis-reads a word or has trouble sounding it out? Lastly, what are the accommodations do you make for children who are not quite up to the reading aloud? I have one gal that has greatly improved, I mean come a long way since Sept, but I know she really does not want to read aloud. Her comprehension is the best of the group though. (We are doing 2nd grade literature with 9/10 year old girls all with various challenges!
                        Christine

                        (2018-2019)
                        DD1 8/23/09 - SC4
                        DS2 9/1/11 - SC2
                        DD3 2/9/13 - MPK

                        Previous Years
                        DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3)
                        DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK)
                        DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others!)

                        Comment


                          #57
                          Echoing Christine's questions! Thank you.
                          Shawna

                          Comment


                            #58
                            Hello, Christine and Shawna.

                            Michelle has been traveling, so I am going to try to answer your questions. We stop students when they run over punctuation or mispronounce words. And it also helps to remind students that a comma means to pause and a period means to stop before they even begin reading. Then, as they read and run over a period, they can self-correct pretty easily. As for students who aren't as fluent as the rest, they still need to practice reading out loud, but you might give them shorter and easier passages to read (be deliberate about what you give them to read so that you are encouraging success). Also, when I was teaching older students, if I had a struggling reader, I would send home the reading for the next day and tell the parents what I would be assigning that student to read out loud. This gave the student the opportunity to practice at home the night before. I found that this made all the difference in the world - and it helped the parents by singling out a specific passage. It became more of a partnership between the school and the family with everyone working for success for the student.

                            I hope this helps!

                            Tanya

                            Comment


                              #59
                              Christine and Shawna,

                              For decoding issues lets look at the word trouble: If the student is reading the sentence "Peter got in trouble." and they stopped at the word trouble, step in and walk them through the decoding. "What do the letters tr say? As in train? (If the extra clue word from the phonics flashcard is needed.) Now look at the letters ou, what sound do they make? Yes, sometimes they say ou as in round (flashcard reference) but they can also say ou as in young (fc reference). Blend those- trou now add your b sound. Le says le as in apple. Now blend those sounds. At this point I'd underline this word in my book to be sure and add a quick review next time we read and also note to review the word and phonograms within the word each day that week. With much practice and familiarity with the flashcards this process goes much faster. You can always use other words familiar to your child that contain the same sounds as well. Also many times the word they get stuck on is one that is covered in the pre-reading phonic material. It is good to have these on a board for the lesson so you can point to them to remind the student you went over this before reading. Typically they will recall these words when they are thoroughly reviewed prior to beginning to read.

                              For fluency, as Tanya said we slow the student down to be sure they pause at commas and give the correct expression with question and exclamation marks. For a student who read a question with no expression, I would often repeat the question with exaggerated expression as an example. Many students need to hear the fluency and expression examples. This is one reason we promote round-robin reading in our classrooms.

                              The accomodations for strugglers would be smaller sections to read aloud and/or giving the student the material to practice beforehand, as Tanya outlined above. They do need to have the practice of reading aloud as this is the only way to improve oral reading skills. The reason your child has great comprehension is that our listening level is typically two levels above our reading level. It is not surprising therefore, that your daughter's comprehension is great. When we ask comprehension questions in K, we suggest you ask the reader the question. This reinforces the fact that reading must have meaning to really be reading and not just decoding. It is more difficult to answer the question if you've done the reading than if you have just listened not having to use brain capacity on decoding, word order, left to right progression or any other skill incorporated when reading aloud. For the struggler, keep practicing and they will be able to handle lengthier sections of text. But remember the scheduled selections for reading are also for classes of students. As a home school reader only expect a selection for them to read outloud that is in porportion to their ability and in relation to what one student's section would be, usually a couple of paragraphs.

                              Sorry this took so long to address. If you have other questions, please don't hesitate to ask.

                              Blessings,

                              Comment


                                #60
                                Thank you! I'm not sure if this is exactly the right post to be asking the next set of questions, but since it is on the topic of Lit guides, it feel appropriate over starting a new thread! I meet 1 day a week with 3 girls to do the literature. At the beginning of the year, we did a lot of the pre-reading exercises and were even able to read aloud the whole selection. We are now at Little House and this is no longer realistic. (We have two separate groups and a toddler running around, so we really only have 30 min that I keep everyone going. We tried longer sessions but no one (including the teacher!) had the patience for it. 30 mins seems to be the greatest benefit. One child is still struggling with decoding, but her mother bought her a phonics program that her brother, in speech therapy is using. She has been using it a month and I can tell it is already benefitting her. The other two girls in my group do not need the specific phonics practice (they always know the sounds the cards were making when we did this earlier), so it seems that we should leave the phonics to the home instruction. (Please let me know if this is in error). I talked to the mothers and we agreed that the point of getting tighter was more in the discussion. WE don't necessarily need 30 min to discuss, at this level, so I would still like to provide some sort of instruction and read aloud time. Do you have any suggestions for how to structure our 30 mins together?
                                Christine

                                (2018-2019)
                                DD1 8/23/09 - SC4
                                DS2 9/1/11 - SC2
                                DD3 2/9/13 - MPK

                                Previous Years
                                DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3)
                                DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK)
                                DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others!)

                                Comment

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