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The case for Literature Guides?

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  • Michelle T
    replied
    Shawna,

    For the grades you mentioned, our classrooms have anywhere from 15 to 21 students. All desks face the focal point of the room which is the teacher/ whiteboard. When it is time to read, everyone gets out their book and is following along as each reads aloud when called upon in turn. Sometimes they sit at their desks to read and sometimes they sit in a circle on the floor.

    The teacher typically has her class chart ready to give a daily reading grade (+,-, or check)and draws a students name on a popsicle stick or calls a name. The student reads a paragraph or until the teacher says stop. Any decoding issues are worked through coaching style and students are encouraged to read with fluency and expression.

    No groups. Whole class instruction from the pre-reading vocabulary introduction and phonic work to the post reading comprehension questions is teacher led. We do suggest some modifications for students with diagnosed reading issues such as assigning their oral reading section the day before allowing the student to practice their section or to have that student team read with the teacher or classmate.

    Blessings,

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  • ShawnaB
    replied
    Hi Michelle! Thank you for the tips on reading when using the lit guides. For the 1st/2nd graders, how many students are you working with in a group when you are having them read aloud the selections? Would you mind share how you divide up the reading among the students to keep things moving? Are they sitting at desks, facing the front of the room, or are you working around a small table like "guided reading" style? Thanks for your help! Just trying to visualize this.

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  • Colomama
    replied
    Thanks Dianna! That worked like a charm.

    Here is Mr. McGregor with his yellow straw hat on the left and Peter on the right getting into mischief.
    Attached Files

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  • DiannaKennedy
    replied
    Originally posted by Colomama View Post
    (I tried to attach a picture of her puppet show, but I get an error message saying it's too large a file. Any suggestions?)
    You can shrink the file easily here:
    https://tinypng.com/

    You might have to run it through a few times, but it should work.

    Leave a comment:


  • tanya
    replied
    Colomama,

    I can't help with your file size, but I love this post! It is so rewarding when students embrace the curriculum and make it their own. You can see the wheels turning as their school experience becomes part of their lives. Ultimately, that reward will be their embrace of truth, goodness, and beauty.

    Tanya

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  • Colomama
    replied
    We read Peter Cottontail today (second grade literature). The enrichment activity was to retell the plot of the story. My DD retold the story, no issues.

    Hours later, as I was washing the supper dishes, I was invited to a puppet show. Daughter had created a puppet theater complete with Mr. McGregor and Peter. She proceeded to retell the whole story with inflection and vocabulary words. Ha!

    This is why I love MP literature and the corresponding guides. The quantity of books is not overwhelming; students spend time with the literature. Reading is not a race with MP. There's no awards or expectation to read through a huge pile of books.

    My daughter enjoyed reading through Peter's misadventure, learning some new vocabulary, and interacting with the story. She had time and interest to go above and beyond the requirement.

    Two thumbs up MP!

    (I tried to attach a picture of her puppet show, but I get an error message saying it's too large a file. Any suggestions?)
    Last edited by Colomama; 01-19-2019, 12:26 AM.

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  • 2Muchfun
    replied
    Thank you!! My daughter writes behind her age so I’m not worried about full sentences, at all!! As a matter of fact she leaves me notes around the house asking me for things! she calls them Notey Notes! I get what you are saying and appreciate the help.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michelle T
    replied
    One skill gained by using the literature guides is how to form a "good sentence." We think this is a simple task, but that is not the case. Yes, students are imaginative and can give detailed, oral answers to a comprehension question, but being able to condense or exapand a thought that answers a question and write it down, using correct capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and spelling is not easily done. That is why we model it for 2 to 3 years within our literature program. This period of modeling is a pillar of our suggested pedagogy key to the transition to independence in grammar school. If money is an issue, purchasing only the Teacher's Guide, for the primary level literature to ensure you get the phonics information and having your child write on lined paper, is a good option.

    Blessings,
    Michelle T

    Leave a comment:


  • jen1134
    replied
    Originally posted by 2Muchfun View Post
    Thank you SO much!!! I’ve had to cut back for financial reasons and I wanted to be sure!! Thank you very much for your very prompt answers!!
    A trick for times when money is tight: purchase the teacher's guide. You can discuss things orally but, you can also ask the questions you do want written answers for and your child can write them down on notebook paper. Not ideal, but it gives you options!

    Leave a comment:


  • 2Muchfun
    replied
    Thank you SO much!!! I’ve had to cut back for financial reasons and I wanted to be sure!! Thank you very much for your very prompt answers!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael
    replied
    Originally posted by 2Muchfun View Post

    If I don't use literature guides will my child lack grammar or is it covered in recitation and Latin?? Thank you! Forgive me if this is asked in the wrong place. I am not getting used to the forum update very well.
    Originally posted by 2Muchfun
    Forum has lost me!
    No worries! You're posting in the right thread and the answer to your question is no. Grammar will be thoroughly covered between our Latin programs and English Grammar Recitation.

    HTH!

    Leave a comment:


  • jen1134
    replied
    Hi Michelle! The literature guides develop reading, comprehension, and composition skills. Grammar really only appears in occasional copywork/dictation activities — except for first and second grade when the literature DOES include basic grammar, extensive phonics, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • 2Muchfun
    replied


    If I don’t use literature guides will my child lack grammar or is it covered in recitation and Latin?? Thank you! Forgive me if this is asked in the wrong place. I am not getting used to the forum update very well.

    Leave a comment:


  • KF2000
    replied
    Re: The case for Literature Guides?

    Could you share with us more of what you mean by “shut down”? What do you see happening when you work through a literature guide with him?

    Because when I read you post, my mind can come up with a couple different scenarios, and I would handle them differently.

    For instance, if he “shuts down” because he doesn’t like the work and simply becomes uncooperative and sullen, that is more of a discipline issue. But even that can have its actual roots in another possibility which is that he finds them difficult, which leads to him not wanting to do them, which leads to a sullen attitude. In which case the answer is to MAKE SURE to keep working at them because he needs to develop those skills that are weak and are making it seem hard.

    But if he “shuts down” because he feels as though he has a lot of work across the board and keeping up with the pace of literature is burning him out (but his skills are strong), then that is a different scenario altogether.

    The key difference in what I would suggest to you is based on whether this shutting down is due to a matter of the will, a matter of skill, or a matter of time. More info on that would be helpful.

    AMDG,
    Sarah
    Last edited by KF2000; 07-11-2018, 11:18 AM. Reason: Horrible, horrible phone auto-change! Ugh!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • RBlood82
    replied
    Re: The case for Literature Guides?

    [QUOTE=OrthodoxHandmaiden;69398]Jen stole the words from my mouth...except hers are more beautiful than mine. <3 i'm going to reiterate much of what she said.

    These workbooks are an excellent way for parents to model good sentence structure for children and for children to work through what a well-formed sentence looks and sounds like. It is very easy to sit on a couch and discuss orally (which has its place!) but often we resort to sentence fragments and sound bytes without really thinking through a grammatically correct sentence or proper punctuation. Furthermore, they help children to develop the discipline needed to sit still and carefully copy (in the early years) or develop well-crafted, thoughtful answers to the questions presented. Students have the opportunity to practice skills that translate neatly to composition lessons and, vice-versa.
    Developing writing skills, correct pencil grip, penmanship practice, good posture, time-management - all of this is neatly wrapped up in the literature workbook exercises. The icing on the cake is that this discipline gradually fosters independence in completing assignments and encourages those nebulous "critical thinking skills" we all want our children to have but we find nearly impossible to describe. (Martin Cothran wrote a marvelous article on the Thinking Skills Trap not long ago. I'll see if I can find/post a link here.)


    This is exactly what I have been struggling with while planning for the next year. My soon to be 6th grader is completely burned out on workbooks. I found toward the end of last year that he would be completely into the book we were reading, then when the workbook came out he would shut down. in all honestly this made each subject a complete chore instead of the quality learning time I wanted it to be. This year we have opted to leave out the literature based workbooks, I did order the teacher books and will try reviewing the questions and vocab orally. I did order the workbooks for latin, science, composition ect. I only excluded the ones for literature. My question is this. Will my son be missing out on key elements by me doing this? Can anyone suggest a work around? Thank you.
    [/FONT][/FONT]

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