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  • generalsparky
    replied
    Re: Math 7

    And if you go with Lial's you will want the soft cover "Developmental" series. The layout is more user friendly with the practice problems in the sidebar. It is an oversized paperback. I couldn't find an affordable copy for Intermediate Algebra so I bought the a la cart edition which is the Developmental edition 3 hole punched and not bound. I put half of it in a 3-ring binder and when he finishes it, I will take it out and put in 2nd half.

    Kelly

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  • generalsparky
    replied
    Re: Math 7

    Originally posted by Katie View Post
    Good morning, Kelly!

    Just wondering which edition of the Lial's texts your children use? Or does it make a difference?
    Thanks!
    There's not usually a big difference in the editions-mainly cover changes. However, I did notice that there was a noticeable difference between the 9th and 10th editions of Intermediate Algebra. I had picked up a solutions manual for the 9th edition super cheap and it didn't line up enough with the 10th to be usable.

    Basic College Mathematics-8th edition
    Introductory Algebra-8th edition
    Intermediate Algebra-10th edition

    Basically I used whatever edition that I could easily find an annotated instructor's manual. You could get away with just the student book and student solutions manual. But I only assign odds to save the evens for additional practice. The student solutions manual only gives the answers to the odds. The AI manual is the student book with the answers given for all problems. And BCM is the only book I allow them to write their answers in so I have hoarded several copies of it. Once we have started into Introductory Algebra (algebra 1), we use grid composition notebooks and Frixion pens for work.

    A few years ago I combed the threads at the WTM forums and copy/pasted a bunch of Lial's info because there is a lady there (Jann in TX) who uses the Lial's texts in online classes. I would be happy to email it to you if you shoot me an email: capsela at gmail dot com

    Hope that helps!

    Kelly
    Last edited by generalsparky; 04-14-2018, 08:01 AM.

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  • Katie
    replied
    Re: Math 7

    Originally posted by generalsparky View Post
    My oldest is doing Lial's Intermediate Algebra now for algebra 2. Life has been a bit of a mess so he's behind but working on catching up! Anyway, he is what I would call a slightly above average kid, not gifted or brilliant. But he walked into the PSAT in October not having quite finished Lial's Introductory Algebra for algebra 1 and scored in the 91st percentile! Lial's does such a great explanations and there is so much mastery involved. It is how the program is designed. I read the intro to the Basic College Math book and it talks about dendrites and how we learn. It made so much sense to me! And sold me on using the books instead of traditional textbooks :-)

    I have always used the 1994 edition of Modern Curriculum Press. It is very similar to Rod and Staff. If I didn't already have enough workbooks hoarded away to even get my 4yo through the series (k-6), I would switch to Rod and Staff. Mastery works!

    Kelly
    Good morning, Kelly!

    Just wondering which edition of the Lial's texts your children use? Or does it make a difference?
    Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • KF2000
    replied
    Re: Math 7

    We are Lial fans in our house too. My oldest is getting ready for the SAT in a couple weeks...so far so good on the practice exams. If she can keep her cool (which she should - like her dad, that one!) we are hopeful she will do well.

    AMDG,
    Sarah

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  • generalsparky
    replied
    Re: Math 7

    Originally posted by OrthodoxHandmaiden View Post
    Kelly and Katie -

    I switched my dd13 from COTR to the Lial text for Pre-Algebra. It's like night and day for her. At first I thought she might be sailing through Lial because the first few weeks were all a review of what she'd done in COTR; however, now that we're in New Mathematical Territory, she continues to do well. In her words, "It just makes more sense. This book explains things better than the other one [COTR]".

    When looking closely at the texts, Lial does seem a bit more like R&S in the way things are explained. The examples are usually tied in to real-life situations, which she really needs in order to cement concepts. If your child seems otherwise ready for Pre-Algebra and COTR isn't cutting it, Lial may be worth a look.

    **I am not a math expert! I have no issue with COTR and may well use it with my math-minded middle guy. This is just an issue of one child needing something a bit different than COTR.**
    My oldest is doing Lial's Intermediate Algebra now for algebra 2. Life has been a bit of a mess so he's behind but working on catching up! Anyway, he is what I would call a slightly above average kid, not gifted or brilliant. But he walked into the PSAT in October not having quite finished Lial's Introductory Algebra for algebra 1 and scored in the 91st percentile! Lial's does such a great explanations and there is so much mastery involved. It is how the program is designed. I read the intro to the Basic College Math book and it talks about dendrites and how we learn. It made so much sense to me! And sold me on using the books instead of traditional textbooks :-)

    I have always used the 1994 edition of Modern Curriculum Press. It is very similar to Rod and Staff. If I didn't already have enough workbooks hoarded away to even get my 4yo through the series (k-6), I would switch to Rod and Staff. Mastery works!

    Kelly

    Leave a comment:


  • Mary
    replied
    Re: Math 7

    Originally posted by Katie View Post
    Thanks for the suggestion. I will certainly keep Lial’s in mind. My daughter has used R&S since book 3 and is very comfortable with it, so we’ll stick with that next year but may revisit Lials for Pre-Algebra!
    Kelly and Katie -

    I switched my dd13 from COTR to the Lial text for Pre-Algebra. It's like night and day for her. At first I thought she might be sailing through Lial because the first few weeks were all a review of what she'd done in COTR; however, now that we're in New Mathematical Territory, she continues to do well. In her words, "It just makes more sense. This book explains things better than the other one [COTR]".

    When looking closely at the texts, Lial does seem a bit more like R&S in the way things are explained. The examples are usually tied in to real-life situations, which she really needs in order to cement concepts. If your child seems otherwise ready for Pre-Algebra and COTR isn't cutting it, Lial may be worth a look.

    **I am not a math expert! I have no issue with COTR and may well use it with my math-minded middle guy. This is just an issue of one child needing something a bit different than COTR.**

    Leave a comment:


  • Katie
    replied
    Re: Math 7

    Originally posted by generalsparky View Post
    As a possible alternative, I have used Lial's Basic College Mathematics over 2 years instead of a traditional pre-algebra course. It did a great job of finding any holes in my sons' arithmetic skills. It is a remedial junior college math text. My oldest son took the full two years to get through the entire book. Son #2 will finish up a bit sooner and we will go straight into algebra 1 when he does.

    Kelly
    Thanks for the suggestion. I will certainly keep Lial’s in mind. My daughter has used R&S since book 3 and is very comfortable with it, so we’ll stick with that next year but may revisit Lials for Pre-Algebra!

    Leave a comment:


  • Katie
    replied
    Re: Math 7

    Originally posted by tanya View Post
    Katie,

    I've been working on it this week, but I'm not going to finish. I have to go work the Cincinnati convention tomorrow. But I'll be in town next Mon.-Thurs., so I hope to finish it up!

    Keep pestering me!

    Tanya
    Thanks, Tanya. No problem. I’ll pester again in a couple of weeks. Happy Travels!

    Leave a comment:


  • tanya
    replied
    Re: Math 7

    Katie,

    I've been working on it this week, but I'm not going to finish. I have to go work the Cincinnati convention tomorrow. But I'll be in town next Mon.-Thurs., so I hope to finish it up!

    Keep pestering me!

    Tanya

    Leave a comment:


  • generalsparky
    replied
    Re: Math 7

    As a possible alternative, I have used Lial's Basic College Mathematics over 2 years instead of a traditional pre-algebra course. It did a great job of finding any holes in my sons' arithmetic skills. It is a remedial junior college math text. My oldest son took the full two years to get through the entire book. Son #2 will finish up a bit sooner and we will go straight into algebra 1 when he does.

    Kelly

    Leave a comment:


  • Katie
    replied
    Re: Math 7

    Originally posted by tanya View Post
    Confession: Cindy gave me her R& S Math 7 lesson plans months ago, and they are sitting untouched on my desk. So, once again, the buck stops on my desk, which is swimming with unfinished projects. I will move this to the front and hope to have them done and ready for sale in the next couple of weeks.

    And, Cindy, I appreciate your not calling me out. You were so gentle with your little "We'll let Tanya chime in ..." comment!

    Tanya
    Good morning, Tanya!

    I know you must be eyeball deep in projects and convention season..just wondering if you’ve had a chance to finish up the Math 7 plans?

    Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • pickandgrin
    replied
    Re: Math 7

    Originally posted by Maria2 View Post

    As for Jessica's Leibnitz quote, I love it. But I was always puzzled at it, too, because I always had to count like a madwoman to get things to come out right, and it was far from pleasurable...
    I took it to mean as a listener, not the musician playing.

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  • Girlnumber20
    replied
    Re: Math 7

    Originally posted by Aquila View Post
    Maria, I think the Barbie said something like, "Math is tough." It was pulled from the shelves because there was such a backlash. Come over one day and we will rework the talking Barbie so she speaks in the affirmative for math. Then we can play it over and over again during those tough math school days. What else are we going to do when it is this cold here? It is relentless this winter.

    I'll race you to the library to see if the book, "Beauty for truths sake" is available! That is a beautiful quote by Leibniz. I may write it out and place it above the piano.

    As for my math 'instructor' he will be added to the 'why I chose to homeschool' list. As a teenager it is hard to hear these things because you aren't given the tools to question properly. And so Anita, I agree with your reasoning as to why more women aren't in mathematics.

    There are so many good tidbits of information on this thread and a lot of great insight. It is inspiring. I haven't heard someone speak of mathematics and the mind of God in a long time.
    Ha- reworking a talking Barbie to say something like "My brain froze when it got to 40 below, I now fully understand the philosophical implications of negative numbers!" - I'm in.

    As for Jessica's Leibnitz quote, I love it. But I was always puzzled at it, too, because I always had to count like a madwoman to get things to come out right, and it was far from pleasurable...

    I fear that if God is a mathematician I am doomed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mom2mthj
    replied
    Re: Math 7

    Originally posted by Maria2 View Post
    I will be your test case. I never learned mathematics beyond basic arithmetic, say, up to about 5th-6th grade math. I can state positively that not learning algebra and higher math has very adversely affected me in my life. My college choices were very severely limited. Science classes were impossible, although I had developed a strong interest. It was a problem I constantly ran up against, over and over again, and that haunts me to this day as I struggle to teach my children, who are very interested in science and technology. Not learning higher math has placed so many unnecessary obstacles in my path, both practically and even psychologically speaking. I have gone through my life with the belief that my brain is incapable of higher level reasoning skills. I would never in a million years sentence my children to not learn algebra and higher math -to the best of their ability- to at least go through the sequence- because I know with a certainty that not learning it has affected the development of my own brain in such adverse ways, and has severely limited my own potential in life. All I can really say is that it is like having a giant hole in your brain where you absolutely know something is supposed to be. That is my two cents on the issue, for what it is worth. Not very evidence-based, I realize, it's just my own experience...

    ETA: You can't really know what you are missing unless you don't have it. If you didn't have math ability and the knowledge that comes only from "knowing" if that makes any sense- you might very well miss it, and even become an advocate for it. I'm willing to bet that you use the higher math you breezed through in ways that you may not be even aware of. To me it just seems like a beautiful gift.
    Wow! There has certainly been some deep conversation going on today.
    Why do we study any of these subjects? They teach us more about ourselves, our world, and God. Latin and Greek knowledge allows our children the chance to study many of the world's greatest thinkers, pagan and Christian, in their native tongue. Each language gives insight into the culture that developed it if one cares to look. Arithmetic is sort of analogous to the alphabet, you can't learn the language without it, while mathematics as I have long contended is a language all its own. It is worth study on its own merits...the patterns and order are amazing if you slow down to analyze and study, but it really is a tool to explain so much of how the world works. I have always had a hard time believing that those who were good at languages couldn't master algebra. Calculus gets very visual...I sometimes have a hard time believing that many artistic types wouldnt be better at math than they give themselves credit for. So much of what has been shared here confirms my belief that attitude and confidence and desire are so very important to success in mathematics. You won't get very far if you set yourself up for failure by telling yourself you aren't good at it or if you don't have someone along the way to inspire or encourage you in your study. Our kids have a goal for Latin, but sometimes the point of math gets a bit murky when you are in the beginning stages. My father very much believed that his girls were every bit as capable as boys in math and even tried to get my mother to major in engineering in 1959. She didn't bite (her best friend was told - really, threatened- that she wouldn't succeed if she actually enrolled in engineering at Michigan State that same year), mostly because she didn't intend to go away to Michigan for more than the year that he made her before getting married. Still, she always knew she could. Kids have great powers of observation and can tell if you are afraid or unsure about anything. My father was never a great fan of the fact that many of our elementary school teachers were ones who lacked confidence in math themselves, yet found themselves forced to teach it. At least by middle school and high school it was their chosen profession.

    Why continue beyond algebra 2 if there is time left to do it? Like Cindy said, you don't know what your child will be inspired to study later on down the road. Those classes don't have to be pre-Calc or calculus, but could be statistics or discrete math. Like many subjects, if you stop math it is hard to ramp back up to level where you used to be. From a purely practical view even a business major is going to be required to take some basic calculus. As an engineer, I studied through partial differential equations. That was as far as I had to go and a bit farther than I cared to dedicate brain power to really understand. Some of that may be due to everything else that was going on in my life. Math is challenging (no, I am not trying to be Barbie, but saying it is easy isn't really true for everyone) and requires time to really wrap your head around what it is trying to accomplish. To this day I am not really quite sure what we were trying to accomplish in that class, but my math major roommate seemed to which was probably why she kept going. I couldn't get past the professor writing every word uttered from his mouth on the board and always wearing the same shirt and jeans to every class. My job really never required me to integrate anything, but it didn't make calculus worthless. All those classes filled my toolbox, taught me how approach and solve a problem put before me, and to appreciate the work of those who continued on further than I did. It also inspires me to keep learning. By the time college rolls around most of our kids will need to decide what they want to do with their life. Maybe their passion and job coincide, maybe it just provides the living to let them pursue their passion. I hope to allow mine to spend their time mastering and enjoying what they do cover in high school, and prepare them to have choices when they get to college.

    Hope that makes some sense.

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  • DiannaKennedy
    replied
    Re: Math 7

    Originally posted by Enigma View Post

    I plan to use dvd instruction when we get there. Yep, I'm a wimp!
    Sheesh. No wimp word allowed. The math woes around here were sucking the life out of me. When I saw that MPOA was offering exactly what we needed this fall, I did a happy dance.

    Sending up THREE CHEERS for the MPOA 6th grade Math class. I owe Mr Piland and Mrs Hutchins chocolate, at the very least.

    Leave a comment:

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