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    How do you grade Classical Composition papers?

    Hello~ I am just curious as to how MP or others grade the CC papers, specifically fable. I have used the simple checklist for each lesson, but I am thinking that I am missing something. I guess my questions are:

    1. How strict are you with grading? What is your mental scale of grace in any given component (if that makes sense)?

    2. Is each paper to contain all of the figures of description (Anemographia, Dendographia, and so on)? Are they to add all of these components (even if the story doesn't have anything related to that at all), to make the story their own? As the weeks build, do they continue adding in more components?

    I missed any goodies from SG this year! I need help with this. Thanks!

    #2
    Re: How do you grade Classical Composition papers?

    Originally posted by makinmemories View Post
    Hello~ I am just curious as to how MP or others grade the CC papers, specifically fable. I have used the simple checklist for each lesson, but I am thinking that I am missing something. I guess my questions are:

    1. How strict are you with grading? What is your mental scale of grace in any given component (if that makes sense)?

    2. Is each paper to contain all of the figures of description (Anemographia, Dendographia, and so on)? Are they to add all of these components (even if the story doesn't have anything related to that at all), to make the story their own? As the weeks build, do they continue adding in more components?

    I missed any goodies from SG this year! I need help with this. Thanks!

    It took me a long time to get the hang of grading from a rubric! Here's what I do:

    1. Look at how much each section is worth on the rubric (Handwriting - 5, Mechanics - 15, etc)
    2. Divide that number by the number of checklist items in that section (so each item in Mechanics ends up being worth 3pts)
    3. For Mechanics items (capitalization, misspellings, missed punctuation, etc) I take 1/2 point off for each occurrence . Any item with 6 or more occurrences means they don't get any points for that item.
    4. In Style, it's more subjective. I only deduct points on the following items:
    • Are words being used accurately?
    • Are no more words than necessary being used?
    • Are colloquialisms avoided?
    • Does every part of the sentence refer to the sentence’s main thought?
    • Do sentences avoid obscurity and ambiguity?
    • Do sentences produce forceful and vivid impressions?

    5. For Amplification, you would only be looking for either inverting or reducing or beginning from the middle, depending on the assignment. The advice at SG was to choose which figures of description to have the kids include. Personally, I wouldn't require more than 3. I made the mistake of requiring more and it gets to be too much.

    HTH!
    Jennifer
    Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

    DS16: MP, MPOA, HSC, Breaking the Barrier French
    DS15: MP, MPOA, HSC
    DS12: Mash-up of 6/7M
    DS11: SC 4
    DD9: 3A with First Form Latin (long story!)
    DD8: Mash-up of SC 1/2
    DD5: January birthday, using SC B and C as a two-year JrK

    Comment


      #3
      Re: How do you grade Classical Composition papers?

      I personally don’t “grade” the papers. We go over them and correct any mistakes and make any changes that I️ think need to be made.
      As far as figures of description- I️ have them include only the ones assigned that lesson. The workbook tells you which ones to include and the teacher guide even includes ideas of where to include them. We usually talk about it before they write so we can brainstorm ideas of how to include those particular figures.

      (No idea why I️ can’t type the letter II by itself. It changes to I️ for some strange reason)
      Last edited by momgineer; 11-01-2017, 04:38 PM. Reason: Add text
      Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
      DD, 25, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
      DS, 23, BS '18 mechanical engineering
      DS, 21, chemistry major
      DS, 18, Physics major
      DD, 15, dyslexic, 10th grade customizednMP plus co-op
      DS, 12, super squirmy, possible dysgraphia, MP 7A
      DD, 6 , K- finally one who seems to like drawing and writing- first one since my oldest!

      Comment


        #4
        Re: How do you grade Classical Composition papers?

        I am the same as Momgineer. I take each lesson as it is, and we only practice the figures listed in the assignment. Sometimes my kids will add other ones in just as they become more creative, but there is enough repetition throughout the program that they do end up getting a lot of practice with each one over time.

        I also do not worry about grading rubrics. If I were hosting a class in which parents were expecting a grade, or was in a school that had to issue grades, I would probably be thankful those suggestions are included in the guides.

        But for us at home, I do not grade them at all. I look for grammar, spelling, and punctuation, but not as part of a grade just to point them out for correction. I also point out spots where they could improve their syntax by saying something better. Lastly, I try to make sure that they have expressed their ideas well. I am not expecting each piece to be a home run, but I do expect to see them becoming more comfortable with expressing their thoughts clearly, concisely, and a bit creatively, too. It is more of a gut instinct for each child based on what I know they are each capable of producing.

        AMDG,
        Sarah
        2020-2021
        16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
        DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
        DS, 16
        DD, 14
        DD, 12
        DD, 10
        DD, 8
        DD, 6
        +DS+
        DS, 2

        Comment


          #5
          Re: How do you grade Classical Composition papers?

          Jenn,

          As we work through them during the week, I will circle, star, whatever, the things that I want them to include in the final draft. They are supposed to try to remember to put them in, but we sometimes forget that part too. Just one of those things that you keep trying to better as you go along!

          AMDG,
          Sarah
          2020-2021
          16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
          DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
          DS, 16
          DD, 14
          DD, 12
          DD, 10
          DD, 8
          DD, 6
          +DS+
          DS, 2

          Comment


            #6
            Re: How do you grade Classical Composition papers?

            Maybe I do it wrong, but I️ have my kids pick one of the two paraphrases (either the one with figures of description or the one with reduction or reordering) and clean it up for their final draft. I️ don’t make them write a third paraphrase. Mine type their work on the computer (one has dyslexia, the other has motor control issues) so fixing up for a final draft is quick and easy since we already discussed mistakes in the actual assignment. So I️ grade the final draft based on the parameters of the original assignment. If they were supposed to include a certain three figures, I️ expect to see those. If the assignment was reduction then that is what I️ grade. You shouldn’t have figures of description in a reduction paraphrase. That’s what you take out in order to reduce.
            Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
            DD, 25, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
            DS, 23, BS '18 mechanical engineering
            DS, 21, chemistry major
            DS, 18, Physics major
            DD, 15, dyslexic, 10th grade customizednMP plus co-op
            DS, 12, super squirmy, possible dysgraphia, MP 7A
            DD, 6 , K- finally one who seems to like drawing and writing- first one since my oldest!

            Comment


              #7
              Helping the student learn to self-edit...

              A strategy that I originally heard from David Wright (high school lit writer for MP) at Sodalitas is to bracket a section, like a paragraph, and tell the student to find two mistakes/corrections in that paragraph. Contrast this to the parent marking all the errors they can find. It's the parent who's catching what's wrong, not the student.

              In giving the student this "editing" assignment, you can begin to encourage self-editing. It can be utilized for structural things like weird comma use, capitalization errors, or failing to indent. Your student may have many errors in that paragraph, but you are giving him/her a reasonable number to find. They may also find others as they scour the section. If your student needs more guidance you can tell him specifically, "In this section you need to capitalize one word and you forgot our rule about indenting. When you've found these two errors please bring it back to me and we'll check it together." This approach can take a little of the pressure off for both parent and student. As they grow, you can go deeper. As the year passes, you can expect a little more.

              Just an idea for your tool belt!
              Festina lentē,
              Jessica P

              2020-2021
              11th year HSing · 9th year MP
              @ Home, HLN, & Latin online
              11th, 9th, 6th, 3rd

              Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

              Comment


                #8
                Re: How do you grade Classical Composition papers?

                Originally posted by KF2000 View Post
                Jenn,

                As we work through them during the week, I will circle, star, whatever, the things that I want them to include in the final draft. They are supposed to try to remember to put them in, but we sometimes forget that part too. Just one of those things that you keep trying to better as you go along!

                AMDG,
                Sarah
                Yes, we often highlight the "keepers." Sometimes there is a bit of chaos happening in that book by the end of a Chreia lesson. I'm sure the margin doodling doesn't help.
                Festina lentē,
                Jessica P

                2020-2021
                11th year HSing · 9th year MP
                @ Home, HLN, & Latin online
                11th, 9th, 6th, 3rd

                Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Helping the student learn to self-edit...

                  Originally posted by pickandgrin View Post
                  A strategy that I originally heard from David Wright (high school lit writer for MP) at Sodalitas is to bracket a section, like a paragraph, and tell the student to find two mistakes/corrections in that paragraph. Contrast this to the parent marking all the errors they can find. It's the parent who's catching what's wrong, not the student.

                  In giving the student this "editing" assignment, you can begin to encourage self-editing. It can be utilized for structural things like weird comma use, capitalization errors, or failing to indent. Your student may have many errors in that paragraph, but you are giving him/her a reasonable number to find. They may also find others as they scour the section. If your student needs more guidance you can tell him specifically, "In this section you need to capitalize one word and you forgot our rule about indenting. When you've found these two errors please bring it back to me and we'll check it together." This approach can take a little of the pressure off for both parent and student. As they grow, you can go deeper. As the year passes, you can expect a little more.

                  Just an idea for your tool belt!
                  As I'm scouring the forum for help in teaching Fable, I came across this post with this marvelous advice. This is a great method and certainly one that I would not have come up with on my own. Thank you for sharing it!

                  Lauren
                  Mama to 5 Sweet Ones

                  2020-2021:
                  10th grade DS: Mix of MP materials, MPOA, and local classes
                  8th grade DD: 8M and 3rd Form with MPOA
                  6th grade DD: Mostly 6M
                  4th Grade DD: Mostly 4NU
                  3.5 yo DS: Copious amounts of time outside beating on things with sticks; MP Preschool and Mom Extras 2-3 days a week

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: How do you grade Classical Composition papers?

                    Paging MP staff ----

                    I don't have my TMs in front of me, and I'm not sure if there are rubrics in the CC manuals.

                    Would y'all be able to post grading rubrics for the various levels? (Fable, Narrative, C/M and R/C)
                    It would be wonderful to have them on the sales page for the levels too, for easy access.
                    Plans for 2020-21

                    Year 10 of homeschooling with MP

                    DD1 - 25 - Small Business owner with a STOREFRONT
                    DD2 - 14 - 9th grade - HLS Cottage School/MPOA - equestrian
                    DS3 - 12 - 5A Cottage School - soccer
                    DS4 - 12 - 5A Cottage School -soccer
                    DD5 - 8 - 3A, Cottage School -equestrian and Irish dance
                    DS6 - 6 - MP K - home with Momma

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: How do you grade Classical Composition papers?

                      Originally posted by DiannaKennedy View Post
                      Paging MP staff ----

                      I don't have my TMs in front of me, and I'm not sure if there are rubrics in the CC manuals.

                      Would y'all be able to post grading rubrics for the various levels? (Fable, Narrative, C/M and R/C)
                      It would be wonderful to have them on the sales page for the levels too, for easy access.
                      Good idea, Dianna! We are actually in the middle of improving our rubrics. Once they're complete, we can post them online.
                      Michael
                      Memoria Press

                      Comment

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