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    Re: Status Report: How's everybody doing?

    Maria,

    First off, I’m going to change the accent I hear in my head to “Canadian”. (I listen to a lot of CBC podcasts, so I can pick “oot” the accent now and even mimic it fairly well. Incidentally, if you haven’t listened to David Ridgen’s podcast series, you’re missing oot. )

    Now — putting on my Doctor Hat and doing some diagnosis:
    Do you often doubt yourself? Are you constantly tired, defeated, self-berating, confused or wondering why this home schooling stuff seems “easy” for others but hard for you?
    Girl, you got a wicked bad case o’the SHOULDS.
    (Aka., I should be doing this; we should be doing that; a good homeschooling experience should include x, y and z.) Let’s add to this your own brand of (self-admitted) “loose” time management and you’ve got a recipe for burnout.

    Honey, this is YOUR homeschool. If some one else does 10 hours a day — seven days a week! — that doesn’t mean you’re “failing” if you don’t. If other homeschoolers are fluent in Mandarin, that doesn’t mean you’re a bad homeschooler if you don’t know a word of Chinese. My special needs son is a red stripe belt in taekwondo, that doesn’t mean you’re a bad homeschooler for dropping it. Your kids don’t have to do all the things that “other” families do. You do have to do what matters to your family. But you also have to moderate that with how many minutes there actually are in any given week, day and hour. And how many of those are going to be spent working productively when you factor in your children’s ages, abilities and proclivities.

    So — what matters? You’ve got all these balls in the air because it sounds like you don’t really know how to prioritize What You Want To Do and how much time and commitment each Extra Thing takes. I submit that if you pare down — even more, past TKD — your extra-curricular activities, you will start to see your homeschool blossom and you all will gain peace and room to breathe. That will translate in to better focus, better work ethic, better grades.

    Get off the hamster wheel of All The Things and do A Few Things excellently. What’s the unofficial Memoria Press slogan? “Much, not many”? (Or maybe I have that backwards...) ANYWAY! it means do the beautiful things with excellence, delving in to each one as far as depth allows and leave the rest. This is the foundational equation for a superb Classical Education.

    Give yourself a break. You’re putting way too much pressure on yourself. I get it! I’m super TYPE A, too. (You should see the curriculum stack waiting for my children at the transition to Second Grade; “I just have to add this.. OH! And that! Ooh, well, if we’re doing that, then we should add this...” Who knows if we will get to it all. But I chose small simple things to add, so maybe...?)

    But seriously: STOP. GET OFF THE WHEEL. Do what matters to you in the time you have to do it. Everyone’s school looks different. Because everyone’s children are different. Play to your core values and apply them to your actual children as they are now, with an eye to where you want them to be. Don’t align your homeschool around someone else’s dictation and someone else’s children. (Ironic that I’m giving you advice on how to ignore advice, I know.)

    You’re doing a stellar job, Maria. You just need to take a breath and make some more cuts and revisions. And you are totally free to argue with me or ignore me. I don’t mind either.

    (OHHHHH, Can-a-da!
    Let’s fish and drink some beeeeeer...)
    Last edited by Anita; 11-24-2017, 06:53 AM.
    “If I should fall even a thousand times a day, a thousand times, with peaceful repentance, I will say immediately, Nunc Coepi, ‘Now, I begin.’.”

    ~Venerable Bruno Lanteri
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Boy Wonder 13 ...SC7/8 + MP4 + Rod & Staff 4/5 + Seton 5
    Joy Bubble 11 ...SC7/8 + MP4 + Rod & Staff 4/5 + Seton 5
    Cuddly Cowboy 9 ...SC7/8 + MP4 + Rod & Staff 3/4/5 + Seton 4
    Sassafras 5 ...MPK + Seton K

    Comment


      Re: Status Report: How's everybody doing?

      Originally posted by klwalukas View Post
      It always makes me sad when I hear that math is sucking the life out of school, but I can easily see that happening if it drags on all morning! I would encourage you to switch from trying to be the crack-the-whip-focus-enforcer to being the time management enforcer. Absolutely give yourselves a class buzzer if that is what you need. Set the timer on your oven for either 20 minutes or 45 minutes, set a task to accomplish in that time, then take a break for 5-10 minutes. Set a timer for your breaks too if you need to. Look at birds, eat a snack, bathroom break, do jumping-jacks, whatever. No one can maintain effective work focus for more than 45 minutes without a break. If you need 2 work periods for math, separate them. If math is taking so long because they need more math fact drills, do those for 10 minutes before bed. The brain works overtime during sleep on the last thing learned. So many homeschoolers do math first thing in the morning and complain about trouble retaining math facts. I am convinced that adding a review before sleep could dramatically change this. I consider music to be part of academics, so I wouldn't encourage dropping it. I would rather see math for 20 minutes, music for 20 minutes, math for 20 minutes. Math and music work together in the brain. I have one dd who never sits down at the piano for more than 10 minutes, but she may do that 5 times a day to clear her head. My girls also have success with starting the day with some activity. Studies have shown improvement in focus when the day starts with physical activity.

      I hope some of those strategies might be helpful!
      All the best!
      Kristin

      Those are some really good tips. I really appreciate that insight and those ideas. Simple, and easy to implement too. I am going to try to remember to leave the flashcards for math upstairs where we read, and definitely start remembering to use that timer again. Incorporate some physical activity into the beginning of the day. Yes. and in between subjects. I guess we just have to accept that there are only a certain number of hours in the day and get done whatever we can in that time frame, and leave the rest. Even if we don't get much done, maybe it will improve in time. Thank you Kristin!

      Originally posted by Anita View Post
      Maria,

      First off, I’m going to change the accent I hear in my head to “Canadian”. (I listen to a lot of CBC podcasts, so I can pick “oot” the accent now and even mimic it fairly well. Incidentally, if you haven’t listened to David Ridgen’s podcast series, you’re missing oot. )

      Now — putting on my Doctor Hat and doing some diagnosis:
      Do you often doubt yourself? Are you constantly tired, defeated, self-berating, confused or wondering why this home schooling stuff seems “easy” for others but hard for you?
      Girl, you got a wicked bad case o’the SHOULDS.
      (Aka., I should be doing this; we should be doing that; a good homeschooling experience should include x, y and z.) Let’s add to this your own brand of (self-admitted) “loose” time management and you’ve got a recipe for burnout.

      Honey, this is YOUR homeschool. If some one else does 10 hours a day — seven days a week! — that doesn’t mean you’re “failing” if you don’t. If other homeschoolers are fluent in Mandarin, that doesn’t mean you’re a bad homeschooler if you don’t know a word of Chinese. My special needs son is a red stripe belt in taekwondo, that doesn’t mean you’re a bad homeschooler for dropping it. Your kids don’t have to do all the things that “other” families do. You do have to do what matters to your family. But you also have to moderate that with how many minutes there actually are in any given week, day and hour. And how many of those are going to be spent working productively when you factor in your children’s ages, abilities and proclivities.

      So — what matters? You’ve got all these balls in the air because it sounds like you don’t really know how to prioritize What You Want To Do and how much time and commitment each Extra Thing takes. I submit that if you pare down — even more, past TKD — your extra-curricular activities, you will start to see your homeschool blossom and you all will gain peace and room to breathe. That will translate in to better focus, better work ethic, better grades.

      Get off the hamster wheel of All The Things and do A Few Things excellently. What’s the unofficial Memoria Press slogan? “Much, not many”? (Or maybe I have that backwards...) ANYWAY! it means do the beautiful things with excellence, delving in to each one as far as depth allows and leave the rest. This is the foundational equation for a superb Classical Education.

      Give yourself a break. You’re putting way too much pressure on yourself. I get it! I’m super TYPE A, too. (You should see the curriculum stack waiting for my children at the transition to Second Grade; “I just have to add this.. OH! And that! Ooh, well, if we’re doing that, then we should add this...” Who knows if we will get to it all. But I chose small simple things to add, so maybe...?)

      But seriously: STOP. GET OFF THE WHEEL. Do what matters to you in the time you have to do it. Everyone’s school looks different. Because everyone’s children are different. Play to your core values and apply them to your actual children as they are now, with an eye to where you want them to be. Don’t align your homeschool around someone else’s dictation and someone else’s children. (Ironic that I’m giving you advice on how to ignore advice, I know.)

      You’re doing a stellar job, Maria. You just need to take a breath and make some more cuts and revisions. And you are totally free to argue with me or ignore me. I don’t mind either.

      (OHHHHH, Can-a-da!
      Let’s fish and drink some beeeeeer...)
      I absolutely have no idea how to prioritize, that is 100 percent true. And full confession, I do base my homeschool on what I copy or glean from other moms, simply because if I am honest, I don't even know where to start. So I copy. It's not really about trying to keep up with the Jones, as it is about trying to figure out *what the heck I am supposed to be doing as a parent* lol! (Sad but true) My educational background is...er...a little interesting, we'll just leave it at that, but suffice it to say I don't really have a great internal sense of what normal schooling or normal education is supposed to even look like. I have absolutely no "road map." It is a blank slate up there, baby, except for the research I've done in recent years.. That's why Memoria helped so much. It was like someone just handed me this wonderful thing called a curriculum manual and said "here you go, do this, you'll be fine educationally. Even more than fine." And it worked for the first couple years. It was awesome! But now I am finding it harder to fit my kids into the little boxes and it is getting harder and harder to check them off, we are scared of getting lost, we are starting to feel kind of...inadequate.. This is making me realize that my original approach might have been *just a tad* misconceived. I realize I have to become the driver, but I don't know how to drive...

      Thanks for all you kind words and encouragement! C'mon up and do some ice fishing! We can eat pickerel in our toques and drink craft beer, eh?

      Comment


        Re: Status Report: How's everybody doing?

        [QUOTE=Maria2;65073I am finding it harder to fit my kids into the little boxes and it is getting harder and harder to check them off, we are scared of getting lost, we are starting to feel kind of...inadequate.. This is making me realize that my original approach might have been *just a tad* misconceived. I realize I have to become the driver, but I don't know how to drive...[/QUOTE]

        You should have my phone number from Delectare (email me if you need me to resend it)....CALL ME. I've got a meeting this morning but will be available any time after 11:30CST.
        Jennifer
        Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

        2021-2022
        DS18: Almost done!
        DS17: MP, MPOA
        DS15: MP, MPOA
        DS12: Mix of SC 5/6 & SC 7/8
        DD11: Mix of 5M and SC7/8
        DD9: SC3
        DD6: MPK

        Comment


          Re: Status Report: How's everybody doing?

          Maria,

          I was thinking about the posts you have received thus far, and then as I got on to answer, I saw your most recent post - so I hope what i have to say will still be helpful.

          First of all, I think you should not be so hard on yourself when it comes to figuring out how to homeschool your own two kids. Even though I really enjoyed and gained a lot from my own educational background, it is still a completely different lifestyle than homeschooling a large family. So you are not the only one who has to figure this thing out as you go - we are each doing that!

          That being said, one thing I did have going for me in making decisions was that even though I read a lot of materials out there that really emphasized the "all the time learning" sort of lifestyle, I personally knew that academics were a big deal on my priority list. It was not about knowing what others valued - it was knowing myself, and my husband, and what we wanted for our own kids. Memoria Press has been a great fit for that.

          But as you just shared, something that will be important for you and your husband to talk about together is the question of what your real priorities are for your kids - aside from any advice that you get from books, or any other families that you might be trying to copy. See what it is that you really value, and then also what your kids really seem to love or have a true natural talent for. Then see what is possible, starting with the most important things.

          Part of this process will be that I think you are experiencing how different it is for your kids to have entered "real school." Many moms I talk to don't expect it, and are often surprised by it, but it is true. We can easily spend the years from 4-8 getting school done in a really reasonable amount of time, and have time for co-ops, extra-curriculars, and all the trimmings. But when your kids get into 5th, 6th, 7th....these are years where they do honestly have a lot of "work," and it changes the tone of the school day. This is their full-time job, and that can be a hard transition for kids, and for parents. But I really encourage you to meet the challenge. The advice you have gotten thus far about setting time limits to subjects is great...I definitely encourage you to do that. I have my son set the timer on his watch to have him know when he "should" be done with a subject - especially Latin, Math, or Greek. Then, when the timer goes of, he either 1) stops; 2) takes a break to go shoot baskets and then comes back to it; or 3) keeps going KNOWING that he is CHOOSING to go over his "limit" and he is risking frustration. But that is a choice that he has to start making for himself - he is 14 and can make those kinds of decisions.

          So timers for subjects is great, and 45 minutes is a good limit to anything. But I have a hard time following the "this is when we start and this is when we stop" sort of limits because there are just so many unknowns during the school day. Your child might need a midmorning break one day, but not the next day you because you don't really need it or can't afford it because you know you have to leave the house right after lunch. For us, it is also unpredictable when we might really be on a role for something - right at the end of the day! I would not cut that short just to stick a firm end time. For me, keeping that rigid of a schedule always makes me end up feeling like I have failed because I have not kept to it. But that is my own personal preference.

          Instead, I keep an eye on how each individual person is doing. When I sense the need for a change of subject, I say, "Ok, that's enough for today," even if we have not "finished" everything that was assigned. We regularly group literature discussions into a couple at once because we don't get to them every single day. Same with composition assignments. If you give your kids an hour and a half of composition at ONE time, you can get a lot more than one assignment done - eliminating the need to have it be an every day sort of thing. My kids tend to like that better. Even though the assignments are written out so nicely in their curriculum guide, we move things around A LOT to suit their own personal preferences. They each figure out which days are the "lighter" ones, and so they either look forward to that, or they move something from a longer day to a shorter day. That helps balance out the entire week.

          The two areas you can't really do any finagling with are Latin and Math. They really, truly are an every day subject, and you really need to spend a great deal of time on them to make progress. You mentioned that it seems to take ALL MORNING and that they really drag. This is where I would set your 45 minute time limits and then stop. The way a lot of folks do it is that they have a 45 min teaching session, and then have the workbook or problems be done later on in the day. It gives the information a chance to soak in, while keeping them from overtaxing their brains all at once. And even if you spend 60 minutes, once a day, then call it quits and pick up right there the next day. I would not worry at all if you cannot keep pace with the lesson plans. As Jen mentioned above, learning for mastery is much more important than a) spending ALL morning to the point of exhaustion on it, or b) keeping up with an arbitrary lesson plan that is simply not working for your own kids.

          I will simply add that I look back on the days when my oldest was 9, and I remember how simple our days really were. They were not "easy;" not in the least. But they were more "simple." Now, I have four kids who are older than 9, who all work very, very hard on their school work each day. They still find time for their own interests outside of their school day, but not one of them has more than one or two 'key' hobbies. They have whittled it down to what is truly important to them, and that is what they keep up with. That is natural and good. They will have the time to get REALLY GOOD at that one or two hobbies they choose, and then just do the others occasionally for fun. It is just a new stage of life, and one that has its own beauty and rewards. The level of responsibility my kids handle well right now is exciting for me to see. Each year they grow, and progress, and I see them becoming the sort of adults we wanted to help shape. You are not doing anything wrong - they are simply growing up, and your expectations and priorities have to change with them.

          hugs,
          AMDG,
          Sarah
          2020-2021
          16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
          DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
          DS, 17
          DD, 15
          DD, 13
          DD, 11
          DD, 9
          DD, 7
          +DS+
          DS, 2

          Comment


            Re: Status Report: How's everybody doing?

            Originally posted by Maria2 View Post


            gosh I just feel like 7 hours or more a day just seems like a lot for a 10 year old, though- at least for my ten year old. He's not very focused. I mean if they were in my h's school they would get 50 minutes of class and a ten minute break in between each one, P.E., recess, a lunch break, regular field trips, and stuff like that- and even there it is only 6 1/2 hours in school time. But, then they have homework, I guess. At home we are talking 7+ straight hours of schoolwork. (plus dawdling) I don't know. For me, I'm struggling with it. I always liked the idea that homeschooling frees time up for music practice or other passions, or, blessedly, more time outside, actually doing, actually experiencing the stuff they are learning about... But we are finding it isn't the case, after all, and their passions are sliding by the wayside. I just hate being a slave driver and cracking the whip all day, saying hurry up, get back to it. It is so stressful. I think I may need to seriously consider your option 1 and 2 ideas, just to make room for some happiness with learning. I don't want to make these kids into Bitzers, but I can't see my way clear to dropping music in favour of academics. I don't know- not every kid is cut out to be an academic? But then I worry that maybe I am just rationalizing, making excuses or sliding off the homeschool wagon just because it is hard... gosh I don't want to do that, I've been there it is no fun either! But I am going to give those ideas number 1 and 2 some very serious thought. Thanks for the very helpful input!
            Maria,

            But this is what I am saying... the 7 hours includes a long lunch (probably more like an hour than 45 mins), breaks to pet/walk our new puppy, dawdling, the 45 mins we spend *per day* on Religion, the 45 mins we spend per day on American history with BookShark, and taking the time HE needs to get things done. *If* I controlled his time more rigorously and boiled down his working time to only MP subjects, he spends around 4 hours per day on MP subjects. I was trying to make you feel better than *his* pace is 7 hours from start to finish to do it at the pace he sets for himself, lunches and breaks, and adding in a few extras.


            Another data point for you. I work for K12 as a contractor. You may or may not have heard of it, but K12 is a virtual public school that is in all 50 United States. The mandatory minimum attendance requirement for the families is 6 hours per day of SCHOOL work. Families get to log PE time, reading, art, etc as part of that, but 6 days is the absolute minimum for K12 families per day, regardless of the grade level, 1st - 12th. Although none of us is trying to create a public school at home, that is another data point for you that spending 6 hours at work is considered reasonable in all 50 states.


            A little food for thought after a BIG Thanksgiving day dinner.



            Jen
            DS, 28 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace)

            DS, 26 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, ENGAGED!

            DD, 23 yrs, graduated from The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC; 2nd grade teacher.

            DS, 13 yrs, 9th grade; attends a private classical school, 7th - 12th.

            All homeschooled for some/all of their K-12 education.

            Me: retired after 16 years of continuous homeschooling, now a high school chemistry teacher at a large Catholic high school

            Comment


              Re: Status Report: How's everybody doing?

              Originally posted by Jen in Japan View Post
              Maria,

              But this is what I am saying... the 7 hours includes a long lunch (probably more like an hour than 45 mins), breaks to pet/walk our new puppy, dawdling, the 45 mins we spend *per day* on Religion, the 45 mins we spend per day on American history with BookShark, and taking the time HE needs to get things done. *If* I controlled his time more rigorously and boiled down his working time to only MP subjects, he spends around 4 hours per day on MP subjects. I was trying to make you feel better than *his* pace is 7 hours from start to finish to do it at the pace he sets for himself, lunches and breaks, and adding in a few extras.


              Another data point for you. I work for K12 as a contractor. You may or may not have heard of it, but K12 is a virtual public school that is in all 50 United States. The mandatory minimum attendance requirement for the families is 6 hours per day of SCHOOL work. Families get to log PE time, reading, art, etc as part of that, but 6 days is the absolute minimum for K12 families per day, regardless of the grade level, 1st - 12th. Although none of us is trying to create a public school at home, that is another data point for you that spending 6 hours at work is considered reasonable in all 50 states.


              A little food for thought after a BIG Thanksgiving day dinner.



              Jen
              Oh! Jen in Japan, I totally misunderstood what you meant. I thought you meant Memoria subjects only, and then everything else was on top of that. Right now it is taking us about 7 hours or more to get through our Memoria subjects only. That is with dawdling. Then we have a couple hours of music practice on top of that, solfege homework, TKD, and any other outside activities, Dr. appointments, and trying to find time to have socializing with other kids in just a playing, outside environment. I guess that is what I am struggling with- what you are describing seems totally reasonable to me. If we could be done with schoolwork, including music, art, and PE, and recess, snack time, etc., - in 6 to 7 hours a day, and then have time left over to read, cook, hang out, go for a walk together, clean something, do laundry, gosh- then I'd be sitting pretty. But, again I must admit that much of the problem is with my inability or ingrained confusion about how to best use time and stay on track. That isn't all of the problem, though. Part of the problem really is the sheer volume of work and its difficulty.

              Sarah, thank you for that thoughtful and very helpful reply! It is good to realize that of course things are going to ramp up schoolwise as they are getting older, and maybe that I have to have a certain level of acceptance that school is just long hours. I also appreciate the difficulties of having a set start and end time. Stuff comes up. All the time. Then the system fails because we get too far behind, and start to feel strained about that. So, maybe it is best to use as a general, but not hard and fast, under all circumstances type rule. Thank you for your post- I will re-read again to get more from it, and the others too. Thank you all of you.

              Jen I will try to call you. Thank you for the offer. It might be hard to make an international call, especially to a cell phone. That might cost you, too. So maybe an email will be better. But I will give it a shot later on or this weekend.

              Thanks for the help. We are kind of drowning, so it is a lifesaver to be able to ask advice.

              Comment


                Re: Status Report: How's everybody doing?

                Originally posted by Maria2 View Post
                Oh! Jen in Japan, I totally misunderstood what you meant. I thought you meant Memoria subjects only, and then everything else was on top of that. Right now it is taking us about 7 hours or more to get through our Memoria subjects only.


                Yes, I began to realize that I hadn't communicated my point well: my 5M kid takes 7 hours to complete his entire day, MP subjects plus lunch plus breaks plus piano plus Religion plus Bookshark plus dawdling, per day. I'd estimate that his MP subjects take 4-5 *max* per day.


                Maria, you may already have your thoughts in order, but I wonder if you might consider catching your breath over the next month, which is mostly Advent. IF you took the core plans and created an A Day and a B Day for the MP work (or maybe there is a subject or two that simply must be tackled every single day, then divide the rest), so that it takes 8-10 school days to complete a core plan week, you could reassess over the holiday break. It would give you the ability end the school day in the mid afternoon, and even add some Advent extras if so desired.

                Another thought I had, and one I come back to over and over in my own long homeschooling career: stop and consider what you and your kids do that you would consider your successes. Really consider this first (write it down if you need to), then begin to add items back onto THAT framework. Consider every element of your homeschool day, deciding on the real successes ("THIS works!") but also the merely adequate. From that framework, rejigger the structure of your days to see if you can a smoother version of the day. THEN add the subjects back as you can. It seems to me that slowing down a bit right now might be a matter surviving an eminent burnout, a real danger to a homeschool for teacher and students alike.




                I was going to stop there, but you mentioned that you like to see how others pattern their day. Here's my 5M's day:


                5:45am - son gets up to his alarm, his choice of time, because he has a morning routine with a favorite TV show which he chooses to add into his wake-up routine.

                7:00am - Literature on his own (30 mins), copy spelling words (10 mins), piano (20 mins).

                8:00am - Religion with Mom (reading, discussion, various activities; often I drill extra CS facts here)

                8:45am - Latin, Math, spelling, Lit, grammar WITH MOM - I go over ALL these subjects, drilling each, teaching, and discussing

                9:30am - snack

                9:45am - quiet working time; son completes the above subjects while I work as a contractor for K12

                11:00am - Composition

                11:45am - Lunch

                12:45am - Bookshark history, "subject of the day" (Classical, Christian, geography, science)

                2pm - Done!






                Jen
                DS, 28 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace)

                DS, 26 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, ENGAGED!

                DD, 23 yrs, graduated from The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC; 2nd grade teacher.

                DS, 13 yrs, 9th grade; attends a private classical school, 7th - 12th.

                All homeschooled for some/all of their K-12 education.

                Me: retired after 16 years of continuous homeschooling, now a high school chemistry teacher at a large Catholic high school

                Comment


                  Re: Status Report: How's everybody doing?

                  Thank you Jen- that looks great. I will talk it over with my kids, especially ds, and see if I can get him to slow down. Part of the problem is this idea that we have that we are working *in order to be able to stop working.* I think that keeps us from being willing to implement strategies that would make life and school flow better. I need to really give this some serious thought and prayer, and do a reevaluation of what our priorities are, as you suggest. I also like the idea of looking at what is working. Coming at it from a positive instead of negative "we're dying" approach, will be a big help. I have my homework cut out for me this weekend, my thanks to you all for the powerful suggestions and encouragement. You are the kindest bunch I know. You are all officially invited to the Great White North for a hot chocolate. Or maybe some beer and pickerel.
                  <3

                  Maria
                  Last edited by Girlnumber20; 11-26-2017, 08:30 AM.

                  Comment


                    Re: Status Report: How's everybody doing?

                    Here is an article that summarizes some of the strategies that have been mentioned, along with some books on the subject to refer to for more information. It explains why we need breaks to truly learn material.
                    https://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2017/11/20/5-strategies-to-demystify-the-learning-process-for-struggling-students/?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_cam paign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=2053
                    Last edited by klwalukas; 11-26-2017, 11:09 AM. Reason: Added link
                    Kristin - Administrator for Vita Beata (discussion classes for MP users)
                    DD19; AFROTC and Aerospace Engineering Major
                    DD17; Senior - doing MP Divine Comedy, Renaissance & Reformation, Cicero & Augustine, and moderating 4th Grade Literature for Vita Beata.

                    Comment


                      Re: Status Report: How's everybody doing?

                      Originally posted by klwalukas View Post
                      Here is an article that summarizes some of the strategies that have been mentioned, along with some books on the subject to refer to for more information. It explains why we need breaks to truly learn material.
                      https://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2017/...m_content=2053
                      Thank you Kristin! Is this a website for the Mindshift and Coursera "Learning How to Learn" courses? I took the Learning How to Learn as it was recommended by Cindy Davis, and I am now enrolled in "Mindshift." Except I fell off the mooc wagon on "Mindshift" cause I got too busy. But- very, very helpful stuff! (Except I keep forgetting to implement it, as the days just get away from me.) I loved finding out how what Memoria is doing is actually backed up by cutting edge science!

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