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Famous Men of Rome

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    Famous Men of Rome

    Hello! New to MP this year, grades 5, 4, and 3 (plus baby). We are having trouble keeping up with FMR, probably because I want to be able to review with my 5th grader (and I've not done much Roman history). I'm finding 1:1 time to be scarce or rushed, divvying up between 3 core users (combining 3rd and 4th grader as often as I can). Also, the names (and pronunciations) and story lines of FMR are unfamiliar to us, compounded with also digging into Greek Myths (with my 3rd and 4th grader). Ahh! Can we let FMR wait until summer? Are there children's books with simplistic Roman history, just to get the names and story lines in our heads? Help! Thank you in advance!
    Last edited by YoursTruly; 09-29-2017, 08:47 AM.

    #2
    Re: Famous Men of Rome

    What about this: what if you combine all the kids into Greek Myths for this school year and do it really well? Then, you could do famous men of Rome over the summer in a more casual way. You could read aloud the chapter once a week and then do the book questions orally as a group. The older student could move on to famous men of the Middle Ages next year and the younger students could do famous men of Rome with the workbook during the year next year. The summer of preview would help make the school year easier.

    Or, you could all do Greek Myths this year and move into famous men of Rome next year. Maybe Mary will chime in, but I know that she started her older kids in more of a group fashion like this when she was just changing to Memoria Press. Only after a few years did she need to separate them out based on ability level.

    The early sets of classical studies and the Christian Studies levels 1 through 3 lend themselves to this family style approach very well. It can be a very good strategy for streamlining in the early years.

    HTH!
    Last edited by pickandgrin; 09-29-2017, 09:29 AM.
    Festina lentē,
    Jessica P

    2021-2022 • 12th year HSing • 10th year MP
    DS 12th • HLN, Latin online, DE math/sci - Headed to Hillsdale College next fall
    DD 10th • HLN, Latin online
    DD 7th • HLN & Home
    DS 4th • HLN & Home
    Me • Memoria College, this summer: MPOA Fourth Form for Adults

    Teaching TFL and co-directing @
    Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School, est. 2016

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      #3
      Re: Famous Men of Rome

      Agreeing with Jessica!

      AMDG,
      Sarah
      2020-2021
      16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
      DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
      DS, 17
      DD, 15
      DD, 13
      DD, 11
      DD, 9
      DD, 7
      +DS+
      DS, 2

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        #4
        Re: Famous Men of Rome

        I read through Jessica's post and nodded my head vigorously in agreement.

        I did start my then 5th-grader in Greek Myths with her 3rd grade brother because I knew she would need to have that foundation as she went on in her MP studies. We did FMR with her concurrently; however, we read the passages together (and I still do this with FM series!). I'd read a paragraph and she'd read a paragraph - this way, she was able to get a better handle on what was going on and since she was actively engaged in reading aloud - not just listening to me or getting bored/distracted while trying to read stories that, quite frankly, don't hold her interest - she was able to retain more of the information she needed. (BTW, this is also a great thing to do with the Greek Myths, if your kids are up for it!)

        Now, that being said, I had the luxury of time at that point. My Little was still napping and I could do this during those precious quiet times. Were my life even a smidge different then, we would have left FMR for the summer or for the following year. In your case, I agree wholeheartedly with Jessica that you should concentrate on the Greek Myths right now with both of your older kiddos. GM is pretty in-depth and can also foster some beautiful conversations about the human condition if you're able to sit and read and talk about the lessons without the burden of having to also get to FMR or another equally-as-in-depth classical studies subject. Do FMR over the summer as a read-and-discuss or as a round-robin (each person takes a turn) read. You'll still get a lot of good out of it as a subject for your 5th grader and as a preview for your 3rd grader.
        Bonus: You can have your kids build swords and shields out of cardboard + duct tape and make togas out of bedsheets and run around the yard re-enacting what they've learned during those warm months. Just maybe set some limits - like not repeating Caius Mucius' stunt of sticking his hand in a fire... *LOL*

        As for more simplistic books about Roman history...Usborne has one that is more like an encyclopedia with beautiful photographs (not a bad thing!) and I've seen some more cartoon-y kids' books on Roman history/culture; however, I haven't personally found any that I *loved* and wanted to own or that I felt would add to what they'd learned in FMR.
        Mary

        DD15 - 9th core + CLRC Ancient Greek I & Latin IV + VideoText math
        DS12 - 7th core + Novare Earth Science + CLRC HS Latin I + VideoText math
        DD8 - SC level 2

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          #5
          Re: Famous Men of Rome

          I had a thought while I was handing my kids their respective quizzes and tests today (I love Fridays! We just get those things out of the way and have more free time!).

          While I can't personally recommend any children's books on Roman history (but I'm sure others can and will!), there are some good books for pleasure reading that your 3rd/5th graders might enjoy. My kids like Detectives in Togas by Henry Winterfield and the Roman Mysteries series by Caroline Lawrence (one title I can recall is The Pirates of Pompeii. While they're obviously fiction, it is neat to read about ancient Rome from a child's perspective - and what kid doesn't also love a mystery thrown in?
          Last edited by Mary; 09-29-2017, 10:33 AM.
          Mary

          DD15 - 9th core + CLRC Ancient Greek I & Latin IV + VideoText math
          DS12 - 7th core + Novare Earth Science + CLRC HS Latin I + VideoText math
          DD8 - SC level 2

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