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schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

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    #16
    Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

    Originally posted by Maria2 View Post
    i want to be like you two when I grow up. My husband was trying to quiz the kids on some science facts today, just to see where they are at with it- and they were deeply offended because, apparently, now that school is "over" they feel they have the right to *never* learn* anything* again* until September. For some reason I find this to be hysterically funny. And disconcerting. I think I am learning to like the idea of working through the year with smaller breaks.
    I confirmed early on that we couldn't take a whole summer off. They were totally off their schedule when we stopped school for the summer when my third child was an infant, and I ended up having to repeat a whole level of All About Spelling when fall rolled around. I hate repeating. This has been longer off than normal for us, but they are a little older now so I hope we can get back in our groove without too much trouble. I would try to find something interesting to work on over the summer...science experiments are a fun option and my kids think khan academy is a game.
    Dorinda

    Plans for 2022-2023
    16th year homeschooling, 13th year with Memoria Press
    DD College Sophomore
    DS 11th grade - Lukeion Latin and Greek, Vita Beata, MPOA Divine Comedy
    DS 9th grade - Vita Beata Literature/Classical Studies
    DS 4th grade - 4A with Right Start F, Second Form Latin, AAS 5

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      #17
      Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

      Originally posted by Maria2 View Post
      i want to be like you two when I grow up. My husband was trying to quiz the kids on some science facts today, just to see where they are at with it- and they were deeply offended because, apparently, now that school is "over" they feel they have the right to *never* learn* anything* again* until September. For some reason I find this to be hysterically funny. And disconcerting. I think I am learning to like the idea of working through the year with smaller breaks.
      ... a kind woman at church -- her children are a bit older than mine -- heard that they don't get summers off and expressed gentle concern. She was _very_ polite about it. And clearly disconcerted.
      Ana, mama to
      ds A, 15 yo
      ds N, 10 yo

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        #18
        Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

        Our pastor was concerned dd didn't get snow days, but now nobody does around here. They have cyber school days. Our local elementary and middle schools are running summer terms through all of June and July, busses and all, 8-3. The kids actually get science, art and field trips. It is optional, but there are a lot of kids signed up.

        I have my grandfather's public school report cards from 1925-1928. They had two 20 week semesters, and really, that's about what we are going to do this year.
        Bean. Long time MP user. Almost retired homeschool mom and university faculty/ librarian.

        I apologize in advance for my typos and grammatical mishaps.

        DD (17) Graduated!
        Mechanical Engineering

        "School Administrator" to niece (9): MP 3A

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          #19
          Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

          Originally posted by bean View Post
          Our pastor was concerned dd didn't get snow days, but now nobody does around here. They have cyber school days. Our local elementary and middle schools are running summer terms through all of June and July, busses and all, 8-3. The kids actually get science, art and field trips. It is optional, but there are a lot of kids signed up.

          I have my grandfather's public school report cards from 1925-1928. They had two 20 week semesters, and really, that's about what we are going to do this year.
          The Latin centered curriculum plans are based on 40 weeks. It really does seem about right for us rather than trying to cram everything into the 33 weeks and then taking a summer to forget it. My only trouble with making it happen is that my daughter is in the online academy for Latin and writing and Lukeion for Greek...those (especially Greek) take so much time that some stuff just has to fall to summer.

          I should ask my dad how long he went to school each year. He lived in a farming community in Mississippi so I bet it was scheduled around that. He graduated around 1945. His pictures all show these little boys and big boys at school in their overalls and boots. I think it is cool you have your grandfather's report cards. In Michigan, the school schedule is totally controlled by the summer tourist industry demands. I would guess all the takers for the summer programs are people looking for babysitting in the summer while they work. That is who fills all the "camps" around here week after week, all summer.
          Dorinda

          Plans for 2022-2023
          16th year homeschooling, 13th year with Memoria Press
          DD College Sophomore
          DS 11th grade - Lukeion Latin and Greek, Vita Beata, MPOA Divine Comedy
          DS 9th grade - Vita Beata Literature/Classical Studies
          DS 4th grade - 4A with Right Start F, Second Form Latin, AAS 5

          Comment


            #20
            Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

            My sister once lived in a small city where the churches were having a problem with free/low-cost VBS programs being used as babysitting over the summer. Rather than pay for daycare, parents enrolled their kids in every available VBS, completely regardless of denomination. At first the VBS leaders hoped it would expose some un-churched kids to Christ. Instead it brought discipline problems into the previously peaceful environments. Eventually the churches got together and scheduled all their VBS programs for the same week.
            I think we probably take 8 or 9 weeks off of school per year. One week at Thanksgiving, two at Christmas/New Year's, two for Holy Week/the Octave of Easter, and a few more as needed for illness/camping/family time.
            Blessings,
            Jude

            DD 20, DS 17, DS 14, DS 12, DD 10, DS 7, DD 5
            DD24
            DS21
            DS18
            DS16
            DD14
            DS11
            DD9

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              #21
              Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

              [QUOTE=SaintJude7;59366]We are at that odd time of year where some subjects are being finished up (mainly high school level), and "summer school" subjects have started. My kids had a week off of school at the beginning of June. That was plenty of unstructured time. Legos, legos, everywhere. We went straight from end of the school year dance recital to summer ballet workshops/intensives at two different studios. I have realized that, because they are five years apart in age, DD 10 and DD 5 are probably NEVER going to have their ballet classes at the same time or even back to back. DS 14 is headed to FSSP summer camp in July, so I'm trying to make sure he has everything for that (plus travel arrangements). Camping gear + TSA and airline regulations = I give up; buy it when you get there. I think, in general, the extra-curricular activities during the school year are more regular. Then summer comes along and throws a wrench in the works. DS 17 had his wisdom teeth pulled. DD 20 is in the middle of moving, scheduling her fall classes, and interviewing for jobs.
              My day goes something like this: "M says mmmm. Let's talk about maps. In 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue... Are your ballet shoes in your bag? How can you tell this verb is in the future tense? What are the two types of actual sin? You forgot to carry the one here. Are your ballet shoes in your bag? Maybe you can wait until we get home and look up "constitutional republic" instead of asking me while I'm trying to make this left turn. Okay, I'll pick up more tights at the dance wear place tomorrow. Yes, the dishwasher repair guy is coming today. No, you can't make everyone eat lunch off of their hands standing over the sink. Did you already finish Greek today? I know I asked you already, but I can't remember. I picked up your glasses from being repaired. Keep them in the case. I want to see those confirmation and refutation essays. How many pairs of dress pants do you need to bring to camp for Mass? Thank your for that listing of all Disney Pixar villains. No tortilla chips until the oral surgeon clears you! Yes, I'm sure your interview went fine. Did you send the thank you card? So how many credit hours do you need if you drop the second major? Can somebody PLEASE find where she left her ballet shoes?" And it just sort of cycles around.
              Blessings,
              Jude

              Thank you so much for this response. I cannot tell you how much it puts my mind at ease. This was our first year homeschooling my boys 10 and 6. We got through week 29 before calling it "quits" for the summer. This decision was an agreement between the boys and I. After the burnout started making our days miserable I agreed to let them "quit" for the summer as long as we continued morning time (read aloud, bible story, music, art) and they each gave me some math. My oldest will do a little latin work as well. We dont get to this every day, as I am watching an extra kid this summer, and well, its SUMMER! I find myself repeating to myself that its all going to be ok! We have also participated in a week long wrestling camp and a week long music camp.

              Keep calm and carry on!

              Regina

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                #22
                Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

                We don't do much formal school during the summer. The girls don't go to camp and I don't register them for any activities. I want them to be bored. We resume all of our subjects mid August, and usually after a summer of complete boredom they are thankful to be starting again. Once school lets out it takes them a while to get into the habit of entertaining themselves and finding projects to occupy their time. My youngest likes to build things. I have given her free reign over the hot glue gun this year. It is quite intriguing to see what can be built with some strong glue, bags of Popsicle sticks and leftover material. She is also determined to reseed the yard and has roped off a section and planted grass seed and is also caring for a section in our veggie garden. My oldest is trying to raise money for charity and is making crafts to sell - sculpey key chains, knitting, beading, and sewing (I am terrible at sewing and she is exasperated by my sewing ignorance. Thank goodness for the library). So right now my house looks like a giant craft room - all the bits everywhere! My oldest is an avid piano player and during the summer she picks out a couple of music books and learns new songs that she can play while my youngest sings. Sometimes they bake or squish bugs and put them under our microscope. Just hoping they don't mix the two! At least they haven't wrapped my house in yarn like they did when they were little. In the front door and out the back while I was upstairs. Took me quite a while to unravel the couple packages that they had used up.

                I guess I lean towards more of an unschooling educational philosophy during the summer, where the kids express a desire to do or learn something and I try to facilitate that process. I definitely couldn't do it all year and we all breathe a sigh of relief once those school books are opened again in the fall. But we also know that summer is short. So we have to get out while we can - pick berries, jump in a pool or a lake, go for a hike or just bike somewhere and sit in a park under a tree. We don't have time for this during the school year. They are only young once and it is good to spend some precious time with them.
                Catherine

                Dd - 13 - 8A
                Dd - 11 - 6A

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