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    schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

    We've had 2-3 rough summers where dd came to full stop for four weeks. I've discovered it doesn't work for us at all.

    She's had two full weeks off so far this summer, and I want to start some academics back up (math, full music practice- which is about 90 minutes a day, music theory and non-squishy brain reading). She'll get 2-3 weeks completely off with some travel later this summer, plus things like a week of 4H fair and some day trips.

    If you keep some sort of school going year round, what do your days look like?

    I'm getting some push-back right now because she wants to be outside when it's cool in the morning, but her stuff doesn't get done if we wait until after lunch. Once we decide on a schedule, it won't be negotiable. I'm in grad school + work, so I need about 2-3 hours a day to study. I work evenings mostly.
    Bean. Long time MP user. Almost retired homeschool mom and university faculty/ librarian.

    I apologize in advance for my typos and grammatical mishaps.

    DD (17) Graduated!
    Mechanical Engineering

    "School Administrator" to niece (9): MP 3A

    #2
    Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

    I sympathize with the the Summer Doldroms, though I'm not in grad school OR working outside the home. I either didn't know, or had forgotten (!), that you are in grad school. A big whoo-hoo!!! (hope this does not sound condescending ... I dropped out of my PhD program mainly to homeschool the older , and so I'm very excited when I hear about mothers continuing their education. And I know it isn't easy.)

    Our summer is being much less academic than planned/usual because:
    my older is doing okay without so much structure;
    the house & grounds &c need attention;
    I'm fairly burned out and redressing PTSD stuff (making time to run means I sleep okay, eating well is important, &c).

    We are doing math and Latin and some Greek every day, except for last week which had little one's birthday + first week of swim/swim lessons in it and was a bit funky.

    Math older works at usual pace (a speed drill/arithmetic practice page + a lesson) though I've begun letting him work 1/2 of the problems in his lesson with a goal of 90%. Less than 90%, he not only has to correct errors but needs to do an extra problem for each one missed + loses input on next day's work (stick + carrot!). 90% is a great target for this child, keeps him working hard but not OCD/demoralized.

    Latin has been crazily light, I'm sort of letting him skate until the SFL review comes out and then he'll do it over 5 weeks -- he preferred this to having the work spread out the whole summer. I've just been doing oral review of 1 declension (including the adjectival version) + 1 conjugation each day. We also work in Orberg's Familia Romana for about 15". (Did I say I was burned out? Does it show? )

    Greek is FFG at a slow pace. We're doing about a page a day, have just begun this (it got set aside last week).

    Piano lessons & practice continue, but the boys are only at about 45" per day practice, plus just a bit of theory.

    Reading: I've begun adding independent reading back in for the older after a break. In the summer I like to do social science (history or geography), science and literature readings. These are usually just read-and-narrate one chapter a day. I gave older books from AO year 6, a biography/personality study of Winston Churchill + "Archimedes and the Door of Science." I haven't figured out his literature yet; I think I'll have him work on Anne of Green Gables and loosely use the MP study guide for comp. questions to motivate him to read carefully. And I'd like him to finish SOTW2 and maybe start 3, but that is fast and easy work -- I orally quiz him with the Activity Guide questions after he reads and can hand him a SOTW test to complete. This helps him focus, otherwise he just forgets everything by the next day.

    Spelling we do 2-3 times a week, either an oral review or a new concept or some practice sentences.

    Little one is doing 1/2 math lessons, math fact review + short drill, Latin prayer review and Minimus Latin with me more-or-less daily. For reading we're working through AO's Year 1, with some of it pair reading and some I read aloud, I try to do some pair reading each day.

    My academic goals for the summer are, in addition to skills progression and general sanity: to place the older child in everything we'll be doing next year (he can be a hard fit, so we're trying to get trial-and-error out of the say), to do the same for younger, to maintain piano skills and build the older's interest in music (I am not doing much on this yet, my Grand Vision is to do a Harmony Fine Arts unit that includes Haydn and to get the boys to some children's concerts), and to do art (we've done some good art projects!).

    my that was wordy! am looking forward to seeing what everybody else is doing!
    Ana, mama to
    ds A, 15 yo
    ds N, 10 yo

    Comment


      #3
      Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

      bean, regarding push-back and playing outside in the AM (same deal here!), how old is she?

      Might she be able to "earn" the next day's morning play by completing her tasks well & on time? Just one thought.
      Ana, mama to
      ds A, 15 yo
      ds N, 10 yo

      Comment


        #4
        Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

        She's 12. She's not really playing when she's out- more daydreaming. I'm all for time outside (nature girl here!), but it can be hard to get her back out of her head.

        ETA: the earning the morning time is a good idea. She had such a bad attitude earlier this week that she has zero screen time until next Wednesday. At that point she will need to complete everything on her list to get an hour a day. She mostly watches educational stuff (we don't have television to speak of), but I think we've got some screen withdrawal going on, which is something of a wake-up call here. Shifting everything to 8am if the list wasn't done the day before could be an additional motivator.
        Last edited by bean; 06-24-2017, 11:28 AM.
        Bean. Long time MP user. Almost retired homeschool mom and university faculty/ librarian.

        I apologize in advance for my typos and grammatical mishaps.

        DD (17) Graduated!
        Mechanical Engineering

        "School Administrator" to niece (9): MP 3A

        Comment


          #5
          Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

          Originally posted by serendipitous journey View Post
          I sympathize with the the Summer Doldroms, though I'm not in grad school OR working outside the home. I either didn't know, or had forgotten (!), that you are in grad school. A big whoo-hoo!!! (hope this does not sound condescending ... I dropped out of my PhD program mainly to homeschool the older , and so I'm very excited when I hear about mothers continuing their education. And I know it isn't easy.)

          Thanks! I'm better with a busy brain! I'm just finishing my second year... hopefully one more to go. This is a second masters. Not sure I could tackle a PhD!

          my that was wordy! am looking forward to seeing what everybody else is doing!
          Me too. I like to hear about how others run their days.
          Bean. Long time MP user. Almost retired homeschool mom and university faculty/ librarian.

          I apologize in advance for my typos and grammatical mishaps.

          DD (17) Graduated!
          Mechanical Engineering

          "School Administrator" to niece (9): MP 3A

          Comment


            #6
            Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

            It may not work for your dd if it is too distracting or you don't have a work surface but taking advantage of those cool lovely mornings we regularly do lessons outside...my most distracted dd helps me water first thing then we sit side by side and I can read and keep her on task if necessary while she does some lessons ...she gets so much more done outside sitting in the shade reading and working...obviously we can't take the piano outside but we get the work done with out her staring out the window every five seconds. Then we play and weed a bit and head in before the pollen and heat get too bad to make lunch.

            We can't take typical 3 month long summers off due to various learning and health issues so we take shorter breaks through out the year. I wish more of them were for fun but mostly they crop up due to illness. We have Christmas/Holy Week/ Pascha built in during the "standard" school year and during the summer there is always one week for parish camp and 2 weekend family vacations. That plus 3 summer b-days, two names days , our anniversary and the parish float in the 4th of July parade gives us plenty of shorter breaks.

            Our school year basically gets stretched to 10 and half months or so but we still really take advantage of weather and health to be outside when we can even if that means math outside in April or October...we already lose months of outside time to heavy freezing rain, 6+ weeks of lessons to illness and 6 weeks limited outside/lessons to pollen during grass season so we go out as much as we can be esp because even with supplementation ds is is always critically low on D...we lost all of November and March, most of May and the first two weeks of June to illness this year so summer lessons are going full speed ahead.

            It helps that I worked in a year round school district for years so it does not seem odd ha!

            This year like most years we are slowly dropping one subject lesson at a time as we finish them...piano and free reading time always stay...Dh's library has a great summer reading program so even if they were not so inclined that keeps them in books. Math usually stays in the schedule since it takes the most work during the year. I always take two weeks off with no math regardless of time of year after they finish a level ...to give it all time to settle and give them a brain break. On the off chance they finish early in the summer we take the 2 weeks then just do math games/review until they start their new grade in the fall.

            Dd's name's day is in early September so we always take a family trip that week ..nice quiet empty beaches after labor day and 'level up' when we get back starting our cores and all the subjects again. Now that all 4 are doing lessons I shifted a bit and the little two start later in the fall than the big kids...that way this summer I have had more time to work intensively with the little ones while the big kids are mostly done/independent so that has been a change this summer but still even doing math , piano and remaining subjects with those two we are getting done well before lunch.

            We have long unstructured lazy afternoons of reading in the hammock or by the fan, daydreaming and puttering in the garden, listening to classical music, sketching, painting and lots and lots (floor to ceiling shelf ha) of board games, go for nature walks and toss the football. and I think that is important too just to have that unscheduled time so it is hard for me to balance lessons I know need to be learned with needed down time but I call it a day at lunch regardless in the summer. With my ASD son I have to help lay out a free time plan as he does not easily fill the day in after finishing his lessons hence all the games.

            We have limited media time too... mostly just on Saturday and none during our two summer fasts except my highschooler who does SAT prep and Spanish practice on the computer in the afternoons...and sometimes both teens choose to stay up and play computer together after the little go to bed but only if lessons and chores are done.

            As far as formal morning lessons go
            DD is still working on MP Music, Math, American History...she was sick more often this year than the last 5 combined poor kid she is usually the first done. To be honest she often sleeps until almost lunch then works while the others are off playing... the advantage of a mostly independent teen ha!
            DS is done with everything but math.
            DD little is still doing math spelling, grammar and astronomy..we held starting Astronomy until late spring because of the big solar eclipse this summer and it is too cloudy until July-Sept to see anything anyhow and it is no fun if you can't see the stars!
            Ds little is doing math and phonics and handwriting with me.

            We did get a lot of push back for the first time this summer with ds in particular wanting to "be normal and not do school in the summer like other kids" He is a by the book kid but the reality is health dictates schedule in our family...he does not like it but is learning to accept it.

            Fwiw Bean I too am impressed you are juggling school and homeschooling. I left school when my health got too bad and I still feel sad about the loss.
            I try to study in the evenings just independently for myself but often fall asleep reading dh finds me sitting up and snoring away a few times a week
            I am always happy hearing about moms getting to work on their education.
            DD - Graduated!
            DS - core 12 with remediation/support
            DD - core 9 with remediation/support
            DS - core 7 with remediation/support

            Comment


              #7
              Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

              Originally posted by MaggieAnnie View Post
              It may not work for your dd if it is too distracting or you don't have a work surface but taking advantage of those cool lovely mornings we regularly do lessons outside...my most distracted dd helps me water first thing then we sit side by side and I can read and keep her on task if necessary while she does some lessons ...she gets so much more done outside sitting in the shade reading and working...obviously we can't take the piano outside but we get the work done with out her staring out the window every five seconds. Then we play and weed a bit and head in before the pollen and heat get too bad to make lunch.
              This is worth a try!

              We can't take typical 3 month long summers off due to various learning and health issues so we take shorter breaks through out the year. I wish more of them were for fun but mostly they crop up due to illness. We have Christmas/Holy Week/ Pascha built in during the "standard" school year and during the summer there is always one week for parish camp and 2 weekend family vacations. That plus 3 summer b-days, two names days , our anniversary and the parish float in the 4th of July parade gives us plenty of shorter breaks.

              Our school year basically gets stretched to 10 and half months or so but we still really take advantage of weather and health to be outside when we can even if that means math outside in April or October...we already lose months of outside time to heavy freezing rain, 6+ weeks of lessons to illness and 6 weeks limited outside/lessons to pollen during grass season so we go out as much as we can be esp because even with supplementation ds is is always critically low on D...we lost all of November and March, most of May and the first two weeks of June to illness this year so summer lessons are going full speed ahead.

              It helps that I worked in a year round school district for years so it does not seem odd ha!

              This year like most years we are slowly dropping one subject lesson at a time as we finish them...piano and free reading time always stay...Dh's library has a great summer reading program so even if they were not so inclined that keeps them in books. Math usually stays in the schedule since it takes the most work during the year. I always take two weeks off with no math regardless of time of year after they finish a level ...to give it all time to settle and give them a brain break. On the off chance they finish early in the summer we take the 2 weeks then just do math games/review until they start their new grade in the fall.

              Dd's name's day is in early September so we always take a family trip that week ..nice quiet empty beaches after labor day and 'level up' when we get back starting our cores and all the subjects again. Now that all 4 are doing lessons I shifted a bit and the little two start later in the fall than the big kids...that way this summer I have had more time to work intensively with the little ones while the big kids are mostly done/independent so that has been a change this summer but still even doing math , piano and remaining subjects with those two we are getting done well before lunch.

              We have long unstructured lazy afternoons of reading in the hammock or by the fan, daydreaming and puttering in the garden, listening to classical music, sketching, painting and lots and lots (floor to ceiling shelf ha) of board games, go for nature walks and toss the football. and I think that is important too just to have that unscheduled time so it is hard for me to balance lessons I know need to be learned with needed down time but I call it a day at lunch regardless in the summer. With my ASD son I have to help lay out a free time plan as he does not easily fill the day in after finishing his lessons hence all the games.
              This sounds lovely! Our hammock needs more use I think.

              We have limited media time too... mostly just on Saturday and none during our two summer fasts except my highschooler who does SAT prep and Spanish practice on the computer in the afternoons...and sometimes both teens choose to stay up and play computer together after the little go to bed but only if lessons and chores are done.

              As far as formal morning lessons go
              DD is still working on MP Music, Math, American History...she was sick more often this year than the last 5 combined poor kid she is usually the first done. To be honest she often sleeps until almost lunch then works while the others are off playing... the advantage of a mostly independent teen ha!
              DS is done with everything but math.
              DD little is still doing math spelling, grammar and astronomy..we held starting Astronomy until late spring because of the big solar eclipse this summer and it is too cloudy until July-Sept to see anything anyhow and it is no fun if you can't see the stars!
              Ds little is doing math and phonics and handwriting with me.

              We have finished almost everything for this year except for her music theory, which we are doing a separate book instead of part of lessons. Math she enjoys right now. She wants to study aviation and is slowly reading her way through a textbook. I just need to keep her out of series fiction, which scrambles her brain, and off screens.

              We did get a lot of push back for the first time this summer with ds in particular wanting to "be normal and not do school in the summer like other kids" He is a by the book kid but the reality is health dictates schedule in our family...he does not like it but is learning to accept it.

              Fwiw Bean I too am impressed you are juggling school and homeschooling. I left school when my health got too bad and I still feel sad about the loss.
              I try to study in the evenings just independently for myself but often fall asleep reading dh finds me sitting up and snoring away a few times a week
              I am always happy hearing about moms getting to work on their education.
              Thanks. Most of my kiddos are married now- one more wedding in November (dd is a caboose baby). I'm fortunate to have all of my autoimmune issues well controlled. I truly am blessed to be able to continue my education right now.
              Bean. Long time MP user. Almost retired homeschool mom and university faculty/ librarian.

              I apologize in advance for my typos and grammatical mishaps.

              DD (17) Graduated!
              Mechanical Engineering

              "School Administrator" to niece (9): MP 3A

              Comment


                #8
                Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

                We are at that odd time of year where some subjects are being finished up (mainly high school level), and "summer school" subjects have started. My kids had a week off of school at the beginning of June. That was plenty of unstructured time. Legos, legos, everywhere. We went straight from end of the school year dance recital to summer ballet workshops/intensives at two different studios. I have realized that, because they are five years apart in age, DD 10 and DD 5 are probably NEVER going to have their ballet classes at the same time or even back to back. DS 14 is headed to FSSP summer camp in July, so I'm trying to make sure he has everything for that (plus travel arrangements). Camping gear + TSA and airline regulations = I give up; buy it when you get there. I think, in general, the extra-curricular activities during the school year are more regular. Then summer comes along and throws a wrench in the works. DS 17 had his wisdom teeth pulled. DD 20 is in the middle of moving, scheduling her fall classes, and interviewing for jobs.
                My day goes something like this: "M says mmmm. Let's talk about maps. In 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue... Are your ballet shoes in your bag? How can you tell this verb is in the future tense? What are the two types of actual sin? You forgot to carry the one here. Are your ballet shoes in your bag? Maybe you can wait until we get home and look up "constitutional republic" instead of asking me while I'm trying to make this left turn. Okay, I'll pick up more tights at the dance wear place tomorrow. Yes, the dishwasher repair guy is coming today. No, you can't make everyone eat lunch off of their hands standing over the sink. Did you already finish Greek today? I know I asked you already, but I can't remember. I picked up your glasses from being repaired. Keep them in the case. I want to see those confirmation and refutation essays. How many pairs of dress pants do you need to bring to camp for Mass? Thank your for that listing of all Disney Pixar villains. No tortilla chips until the oral surgeon clears you! Yes, I'm sure your interview went fine. Did you send the thank you card? So how many credit hours do you need if you drop the second major? Can somebody PLEASE find where she left her ballet shoes?" And it just sort of cycles around.
                Blessings,
                Jude

                DD 20, DS 17, DS 14, DS 12, DD 10, DS 7, DD 5
                DD24
                DS21
                DS18
                DS16
                DD14
                DS11
                DD9

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

                  Originally posted by SaintJude7 View Post
                  We are at that odd time of year where some subjects are being finished up (mainly high school level), and "summer school" subjects have started. My kids had a week off of school at the beginning of June. That was plenty of unstructured time. Legos, legos, everywhere. We went straight from end of the school year dance recital to summer ballet workshops/intensives at two different studios. I have realized that, because they are five years apart in age, DD 10 and DD 5 are probably NEVER going to have their ballet classes at the same time or even back to back. DS 14 is headed to FSSP summer camp in July, so I'm trying to make sure he has everything for that (plus travel arrangements). Camping gear + TSA and airline regulations = I give up; buy it when you get there. I think, in general, the extra-curricular activities during the school year are more regular. Then summer comes along and throws a wrench in the works. DS 17 had his wisdom teeth pulled. DD 20 is in the middle of moving, scheduling her fall classes, and interviewing for jobs.
                  My day goes something like this: "M says mmmm. Let's talk about maps. In 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue... Are your ballet shoes in your bag? How can you tell this verb is in the future tense? What are the two types of actual sin? You forgot to carry the one here. Are your ballet shoes in your bag? Maybe you can wait until we get home and look up "constitutional republic" instead of asking me while I'm trying to make this left turn. Okay, I'll pick up more tights at the dance wear place tomorrow. Yes, the dishwasher repair guy is coming today. No, you can't make everyone eat lunch off of their hands standing over the sink. Did you already finish Greek today? I know I asked you already, but I can't remember. I picked up your glasses from being repaired. Keep them in the case. I want to see those confirmation and refutation essays. How many pairs of dress pants do you need to bring to camp for Mass? Thank your for that listing of all Disney Pixar villains. No tortilla chips until the oral surgeon clears you! Yes, I'm sure your interview went fine. Did you send the thank you card? So how many credit hours do you need if you drop the second major? Can somebody PLEASE find where she left her ballet shoes?" And it just sort of cycles around.
                  Blessings,
                  Jude

                  DD 20, DS 17, DS 14, DS 12, DD 10, DS 7, DD 5
                  Have you bugged my house?! Interject coffee, chasing a toddler and the Golden Retriever and this is my house! (Except at a lower academic level. )
                  “If I should fall even a thousand times a day, a thousand times, with peaceful repentance, I will say immediately, Nunc Coepi, ‘Now, I begin.’.”

                  ~Venerable Bruno Lanteri
                  ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
                  Wonder Boy 14 ... MP5 + R&S Math 6
                  Joy Bubble 12 ... MP5 full core
                  Cowboy 10 ... MP5 + R&S Math 4
                  Sassafras 6 ... MP1
                  All … SSPX Catechesis

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

                    Jude, may I ask about your "summer subjects" and schedule? Do you keep to the 8-12, 1-3 during the summer? and do you do any MP "subjects" -- I am thinking not Latin or other skills, but things like the science, Christian Studies, classical studies, geography.
                    Ana, mama to
                    ds A, 15 yo
                    ds N, 10 yo

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

                      Originally posted by serendipitous journey View Post
                      Jude, may I ask about your "summer subjects" and schedule? Do you keep to the 8-12, 1-3 during the summer? and do you do any MP "subjects" -- I am thinking not Latin or other skills, but things like the science, Christian Studies, classical studies, geography.
                      Yes, we still do the 8-3 schedule during summer as part of year round schooling. It's so hot here during the summer, no one wants to be out after 10:00 a.m. anyway. We don't use the MP high school sciences or math. I believe we use most of their Christian studies, Classical Studies, Modern/American studies, Literature, and geography. I also don't want to miss out on more Catholic content. For high school, DD 20 did a combination of Kolbe Academy, MP, and other resources, based on the recommendations in Campbell's "The Latin-Centered Curriculum." DS 14 is doing the same, because he is a year ahead of the MP releases.
                      Usually I (or my children) want to cover more than MP has in the core curriculum. Instead of trying to cram everything in during a nine month school year, some things get pulled out and done with greater focus in 12 weeks. Not all subjects are written for 32 or 33 weeks, and as one is finished, we move on to the next level. If it's week one of the "school year" a child could be in the beginning of a new level of Latin, the middle of Elementary Greek, and about to finish another year of math. I just like that fall tradition of new school supplies and taking a group picture. My kids do tend to need reminding of what "grade" they are in, in case anyone asks. Sometimes I forget too. ("Mom, what grade am I in?" Me: "I don't know. Let me text Hunter's mom and find out what grade he's in this year at school.") The kid with the early October birthday works at least a full year ahead of his friends "in the same grade," because they had to go by that September 1st cutoff date to start school. I once tried going by what level math they were in, but they move through math levels faster than kids on a nine month school year.
                      Blessings,
                      Jude

                      DD 20, DS 17, DS 14, DS 12, DD 10, DS 7, DD 5
                      DD24
                      DS21
                      DS18
                      DS16
                      DD14
                      DS11
                      DD9

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

                        Originally posted by Anita View Post
                        Have you bugged my house?! Interject coffee, chasing a toddler and the Golden Retriever and this is my house! (Except at a lower academic level. )
                        Lol- same here when everyone was home, but the constantly missing items are swim suits and glasses. The glasses baffle me- how do you loose the thing you need to see with?!
                        Bean. Long time MP user. Almost retired homeschool mom and university faculty/ librarian.

                        I apologize in advance for my typos and grammatical mishaps.

                        DD (17) Graduated!
                        Mechanical Engineering

                        "School Administrator" to niece (9): MP 3A

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

                          Originally posted by SaintJude7 View Post
                          Yes, we still do the 8-3 schedule during summer as part of year round schooling. It's so hot here during the summer, no one wants to be out after 10:00 a.m. anyway. We don't use the MP high school sciences or math. I believe we use most of their Christian studies, Classical Studies, Modern/American studies, Literature, and geography. I also don't want to miss out on more Catholic content. For high school, DD 20 did a combination of Kolbe Academy, MP, and other resources, based on the recommendations in Campbell's "The Latin-Centered Curriculum." DS 14 is doing the same, because he is a year ahead of the MP releases.
                          Usually I (or my children) want to cover more than MP has in the core curriculum. Instead of trying to cram everything in during a nine month school year, some things get pulled out and done with greater focus in 12 weeks. Not all subjects are written for 32 or 33 weeks, and as one is finished, we move on to the next level. If it's week one of the "school year" a child could be in the beginning of a new level of Latin, the middle of Elementary Greek, and about to finish another year of math. I just like that fall tradition of new school supplies and taking a group picture. My kids do tend to need reminding of what "grade" they are in, in case anyone asks. Sometimes I forget too. ("Mom, what grade am I in?" Me: "I don't know. Let me text Hunter's mom and find out what grade he's in this year at school.") The kid with the early October birthday works at least a full year ahead of his friends "in the same grade," because they had to go by that September 1st cutoff date to start school. I once tried going by what level math they were in, but they move through math levels faster than kids on a nine month school year.
                          Blessings,
                          Jude

                          DD 20, DS 17, DS 14, DS 12, DD 10, DS 7, DD 5
                          I love that deer-in-headlights look when someone asks dd what her grade is. You can always tell a homeschool kid when... I just have calendar years on her transcript right now. At some point I'm going to have to say, "This is 9th grade."

                          Thank you all for telling me about your days. Still not 100% sure how I'm going structure it, but dd is much more on board with things after a long media-free weekend. We have some small business stuff in addition to our jobs/ school, so not giving dd a long summer will help us grab some vacation time during the year as we are able to take it. We sat and structured our week into both of planners this morning and are off to a good start for this week. She's decided she wants to work on a science elective over the summer, too.
                          Bean. Long time MP user. Almost retired homeschool mom and university faculty/ librarian.

                          I apologize in advance for my typos and grammatical mishaps.

                          DD (17) Graduated!
                          Mechanical Engineering

                          "School Administrator" to niece (9): MP 3A

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

                            Originally posted by bean View Post
                            I love that deer-in-headlights look when someone asks dd what her grade is. You can always tell a homeschool kid when... I just have calendar years on her transcript right now. At some point I'm going to have to say, "This is 9th grade."

                            Thank you all for telling me about your days. Still not 100% sure how I'm going structure it, but dd is much more on board with things after a long media-free weekend. We have some small business stuff in addition to our jobs/ school, so not giving dd a long summer will help us grab some vacation time during the year as we are able to take it. We sat and structured our week into both of planners this morning and are off to a good start for this week. She's decided she wants to work on a science elective over the summer, too.
                            Bean,
                            Glad you have a good start to the week and a plan. I started fairly early on telling my kids what grade they were in (not what level they were working at, just age based) because when asked what grade they were in they were in at school by daughter would say "we don't go to school". Now what she MEANT was we stay home, but it did raise a few eyebrows.

                            I usually use summer to finish up the previous year and I always make the kids keep working on math. My problem is that at some point I REALLY need time to clean the house and the basement to keep papers and stuff from taking over. So far we are not off to a great start this summer. Week before last my sister came into town with my niece and then we drove her to Massachusetts for a summer long music program. Last week was VBS, and this week is camp. It has been nice to get some of my stuff done, see my sister, and not have to be on them all the time. Next week my daughter starts the Fourth Form review class and Romeo and Juliet class and we are going to get a jump start on geometry. She also wants to work on some AHG badge work. My rising 7th grader is going to Trail Life camp for a week with his dad in the middle of July so he will do a bit of finishing up in July and start back full time in August. I will get the rising fourth grade back working next week.

                            Good luck this week!
                            Dorinda

                            Plans for 2021-2022
                            15th year homeschooling, 12th year with Memoria Press
                            DD College Freshman
                            DS 10th grade - Lukeion Latin and Greek, Vita Beata Greek Dramas
                            DS 8th grade - Vita Beata Literature
                            DS 3rd grade - Vita Beata Literature, Right Start F, First Form Latin

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                              #15
                              Re: schooling over summer- what does it look like at your house?

                              Originally posted by Mom2mthj View Post
                              Bean,
                              Glad you have a good start to the week and a plan. I started fairly early on telling my kids what grade they were in (not what level they were working at, just age based) because when asked what grade they were in they were in at school by daughter would say "we don't go to school". Now what she MEANT was we stay home, but it did raise a few eyebrows.

                              I usually use summer to finish up the previous year and I always make the kids keep working on math. My problem is that at some point I REALLY need time to clean the house and the basement to keep papers and stuff from taking over. So far we are not off to a great start this summer. Week before last my sister came into town with my niece and then we drove her to Massachusetts for a summer long music program. Last week was VBS, and this week is camp. It has been nice to get some of my stuff done, see my sister, and not have to be on them all the time. Next week my daughter starts the Fourth Form review class and Romeo and Juliet class and we are going to get a jump start on geometry. She also wants to work on some AHG badge work. My rising 7th grader is going to Trail Life camp for a week with his dad in the middle of July so he will do a bit of finishing up in July and start back full time in August. I will get the rising fourth grade back working next week.

                              Good luck this week!
                              i want to be like you two when I grow up. My husband was trying to quiz the kids on some science facts today, just to see where they are at with it- and they were deeply offended because, apparently, now that school is "over" they feel they have the right to *never* learn* anything* again* until September. For some reason I find this to be hysterically funny. And disconcerting. I think I am learning to like the idea of working through the year with smaller breaks.

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