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    VAmom
    Senior Member

  • VAmom
    replied
    Re: teaching children to work well & to be prompt

    [QUOTE=SaintJude7;59403]He pretty much needs the full school day. He is very slow at writing. He has a lot of memory work to keep him busy. He was going through First Communion preparation this year, so he also had to memorize all of the answers to the First Communion Catechism. If he finishes before 3:00, he has extra assigned reading as well. And he occasionally listens in to what I read to DD 5.


    Thank you Jude! It is helpful to know that school for this age might take more than 2 hours.

    Leave a comment:

  • bean
    Senior Member

  • bean
    replied
    Re: teaching children to work well & to be prompt

    Originally posted by howiecram View Post
    This sounds promising!! I'm pretty much a "yoga" mom! But not because we are fitness fanatics. I generally don't like clothes! LOL I like the comfy clothes!! However, I want to look like it is 2017, but with modesty.
    My only caveat is that they do need to air dry or they temporarily "shrink" in the legs until I wash them again. I just hang them by the bottom hem from a clip hanger on the shower rod as they come out of the washer.

    Leave a comment:

  • howiecram
    Senior Member

  • howiecram
    replied
    Re: teaching children to work well & to be prompt

    Originally posted by bean View Post

    I have had good luck finding dress slacks for me in a somewhat stretchy fabric in petite lengths at - surprisingly- Walmart. I need to wear dress slacks at work (skirts would not work at all!), and these are super comfy. I can just get dressed in the morning and look "together" all day. I'd like to upgrade my sweaters and blouses a bit, though.
    This sounds promising!! I'm pretty much a "yoga" mom! But not because we are fitness fanatics. I generally don't like clothes! LOL I like the comfy clothes!! However, I want to look like it is 2017, but with modesty.

    Leave a comment:

  • bean
    Senior Member

  • bean
    replied
    Re: teaching children to work well & to be prompt

    Love the uniform suggestion- not necessarily to have an out-and-out uniform for dd (school jumpers for a class of one?) but because she likes to dress nicely. She's at an age with it is really hard to find modest (her words) and well made clothes because she would be a juniors size- or a hard-to-find girls 16. This thread gave me an ah-ha moment. School uniforms go up to size 20! They come in solid colors with easy care fabrics! Easy to match! More modest that the usual offerings. This could make fall much easier. She's tried to wear my dress blouses, but always has to layer another shirt underneath. French Toast has some just the style she wants.

    I have had good luck finding dress slacks for me in a somewhat stretchy fabric in petite lengths at - surprisingly- Walmart. I need to wear dress slacks at work (skirts would not work at all!), and these are super comfy. I can just get dressed in the morning and look "together" all day. I'd like to upgrade my sweaters and blouses a bit, though.

    Leave a comment:

  • SaintJude7
    Senior Member

  • SaintJude7
    replied
    Re: teaching children to work well & to be prompt

    Originally posted by VAmom View Post
    Jude,

    Thank you for your help. And I'm glad to know that I'm not expecting way more or less chores of my 7 year old. So how long does your ds7 do school?

    Thanks,
    Heidi
    He pretty much needs the full school day. He is very slow at writing. He has a lot of memory work to keep him busy. He was going through First Communion preparation this year, so he also had to memorize all of the answers to the First Communion Catechism. If he finishes before 3:00, he has extra assigned reading as well. And he occasionally listens in to what I read to DD 5.

    Blessings,
    Jude

    DD 20, DS 17, DS 14, DS12, DD 10, DS 7, DD5

    Leave a comment:

  • VAmom
    Senior Member

  • VAmom
    replied
    Re: teaching children to work well & to be prompt

    Originally posted by SaintJude7 View Post
    VA Mom,
    Remember that you will set whatever hours work for your particular situation. But once they are set, there is no negotiation. Figure out how many hours it should take your second grader to accomplish the full workload and time for study. It may be the case that everything can be done, and done well, in a few hours. A lot of this depends on your nap schedule for the other two and what your second grader is able to do without direct supervision. The important thing is that, if you say school is from 8:00 to 12:00, they don't think they can rush through it in two hours and then have two hours to play.
    My seven year old has to make his bed, clean his part of his bedroom, pick up the living room and anything left on the stairs, put away his toys, dust the bookshelves, and fold towels. (He's ready to do more, but some of the other things he could do are taken by DD 10 and DD 5.)
    Blessings,
    Jude

    DD 20, DS 17, DS 14, DS 12, DD 10, DS 7, DD 5
    Jude,

    Thank you for your help. And I'm glad to know that I'm not expecting way more or less chores of my 7 year old. So how long does your ds7 do school?

    Thanks,
    Heidi

    Leave a comment:

  • serendipitous journey
    Senior Member

  • serendipitous journey
    replied
    Re: teaching children to work well & to be prompt

    Originally posted by SaintJude7 View Post
    I pretty much have a daily uniform, and I always have a Lands End cardigan with me, even in summer. I wear various skirts that come down past my knees. I own a particular LL Bean boatneck, heavy cotton top in at least eight different colors. (The fabric is so soft, DS 12 asked if I can make him a quilt from them when they wear out.) I don't like to think about what I am going to wear in the morning. This combination is appropriate for pretty much everywhere that I go during the week.
    Blessings,
    Jude

    DD 20, DS 17, DS 14, DS 12, DD 10, DS 7, DD 5
    Thanks for this uniform rundown! My boys have a uniform of polo shirts + khaki pants/shorts (though this year's shorts are grey or navy b/c that was what was on sale) and, though they have polos in a few different colors, they don't get any days off their uniforms: that's what they wear on weekends too. With plain t-shirts for layering.

    But my uniform needs work. This year it was black shirt + jeans + scarf, and I want to do something better than the jeans. So glad to see what you do and have a sense of what a nicer "mama/teacher uniform" might be. When the little was smaller I had to have a uniform that enabled me to scootch down a hill on my rear end (we live at the end of a narrow road and on the side of a hill, so what with road closings and other occasional excitement I really had to do this sometimes, carrying the child). But now he can totally walk everywhere in all weather! I can upgrade!

    Leave a comment:

  • SaintJude7
    Senior Member

  • SaintJude7
    replied
    Re: teaching children to work well & to be prompt

    Originally posted by MaggieAnnie View Post
    Well most days at home find me in cargo shorts and ribbed tank top so I would say you look pretty put together! Really though those pockets come in handy do you know how many pencils and books I can fit in there!?


    It is funny I loved the uniforms in my schools growing up. Even in high-school it was one of my favorite parts the school year...not having to pick an outfit...it was never really about the formal look for me just easy, uncomplicated. When I do go out my clothes do suspiciously look like my old high school uniform if you swap the skirt for my shorts right down to the lands end sweater...I love those ha!
    I pretty much have a daily uniform, and I always have a Lands End cardigan with me, even in summer. I wear various skirts that come down past my knees. I own a particular LL Bean boatneck, heavy cotton top in at least eight different colors. (The fabric is so soft, DS 12 asked if I can make him a quilt from them when they wear out.) I don't like to think about what I am going to wear in the morning. This combination is appropriate for pretty much everywhere that I go during the week.
    Blessings,
    Jude

    DD 20, DS 17, DS 14, DS 12, DD 10, DS 7, DD 5

    Leave a comment:

  • SaintJude7
    Senior Member

  • SaintJude7
    replied
    Re: teaching children to work well & to be prompt

    VA Mom,
    Remember that you will set whatever hours work for your particular situation. But once they are set, there is no negotiation. Figure out how many hours it should take your second grader to accomplish the full workload and time for study. It may be the case that everything can be done, and done well, in a few hours. A lot of this depends on your nap schedule for the other two and what your second grader is able to do without direct supervision. The important thing is that, if you say school is from 8:00 to 12:00, they don't think they can rush through it in two hours and then have two hours to play.
    My seven year old has to make his bed, clean his part of his bedroom, pick up the living room and anything left on the stairs, put away his toys, dust the bookshelves, and fold towels. (He's ready to do more, but some of the other things he could do are taken by DD 10 and DD 5.)
    Blessings,
    Jude

    DD 20, DS 17, DS 14, DS 12, DD 10, DS 7, DD 5

    Leave a comment:

  • VAmom
    Senior Member

  • VAmom
    replied
    Re: teaching children to work well & to be prompt

    Ok ladies, I need some help on this one. My 7 year old, who is entering 2nd grade, seems to have I will do the least amount required tendency. I think the idea of a start and end time would be beneficial but I'm struggling with how that would look with a JrK and 2 year old running around too. How long should they do school work and how did it look when your kids were this age? How many chores were they doing? I'm wanting to instill good habits now. As much I want to be more laid back about our routine and habits, I'm realizing that it won't work. I've thought the 7 year old may have some anxiety or something but am not sure. The 5 year old is being evaluated for sensory processing disorder and I'm trying to figure out what's best for them. So I'll stop rambling now and say thank you for all the advice.

    Leave a comment:

  • MaggieAnnie
    Senior Member

  • MaggieAnnie
    replied
    Re: teaching children to work well & to be prompt

    Originally posted by Anita View Post
    If I get "teacher uniform" credit for Capri leggings, a bright colored workout shirt, a pony tail and sandals!
    Well most days at home find me in cargo shorts and ribbed tank top so I would say you look pretty put together! Really though those pockets come in handy do you know how many pencils and books I can fit in there!?


    It is funny I loved the uniforms in my schools growing up. Even in high-school it was one of my favorite parts the school year...not having to pick an outfit...it was never really about the formal look for me just easy, uncomplicated. When I do go out my clothes do suspiciously look like my old high school uniform if you swap the skirt for my shorts right down to the lands end sweater...I love those ha!

    Leave a comment:

  • Anita
    Senior Member

  • Anita
    replied
    Re: teaching children to work well & to be prompt

    Originally posted by SaintJude7 View Post
    Anita,
    I think that children on the milder end of the spectrum come with their own set of worries. They usually know when they are not fitting into a social situation, whereas my son is blissfully unaware. They often straddle that line between special ed and completely mainstreamed, not feeling at home in either. They can go to college but may need assistance, especially with executive functioning. Relationships can be difficult, as well as navigating workplace environments. That's an awful lot to manage.
    In our son's case, we knew by the time he was seven that he would never go to college, never have a job, never get married, etc... His speech and communication skills have improved but will never move beyond severely impaired. He will need care and protection the rest of his life.
    At the same time, his disability has been an amazing gift to our family. I once had to write a letter to my oldest daughter's new teacher. She had asked each parent to describe their child and their family. I started it off with something along the lines of, "Had (name) been our only child, we probably would have been the most asinine helicopter parents imaginable. Thankfully, God knew what he was doing and sent us a child with special needs to kick us in the butt and show us each day what is truly important. (Name) is very bright, but we know she is far from perfect..." The teacher said she had enjoyed our letter after reading so many others where the parents thought their child was the most special, talented child ever.
    If you do discover that we were separated at birth, please have your mother call me. My mother is...unique. I'm definitely open to adding on another mother figure in my life.
    Blessings,
    Jude

    DD 20, DS 17, DS 14, DS 12, DD 10, DS 7, DD 5
    Our oldest did not speak until after his fifth birthday. His next younger sibling is also ASD-language affected. I TOTALLY get this.

    You don't want my mother. (Yikes.) ... Maybe we *were* separated at birth (?)

    Leave a comment:

  • Anita
    Senior Member

  • Anita
    replied
    Re: teaching children to work well & to be prompt

    Originally posted by MaggieAnnie View Post
    Oh thank you thank you thank you...perfect timing on this thread...
    I have been wracking my brain trying to figure out what to do with ds.

    Esp moving into 8th there is so much we can delve into in the fall he but has just been coasting the last year and I was unsure how to address it.

    Jude you cracked me up.
    I feel very blessed that I can laugh most days ...whoever says sorrow and joy can not journey together was most likely not a parent.

    He loves set schedules it never occurred to me to set an end time as well as a start time ..why didn't it?!
    He is one that is on task the moment he wakes, refuses to take breaks..I have to add movement breaks to his schedule... but he barely does the minimum work with out prompting...his goal is never really to do what ever work...it is just always to be finished...he does love checking off the boxes but then is at a loss what to do with himself. We need to help him see the benefit of the delving deeper but for him he is hyper focused on the process of moving forward...it is always "what is the next step" and never how can I really engage in what I am doing now.
    I like the idea of expected work to go through when his work is finished.

    The are so many periods where the bare minimum is all that is physically possible but it means we set our bar low to accommodate...but now we realize that it is not nearly enough challenge during times of health...but having a binder as you said to turn to when he is done with lessonwork and not needing to immediately sleep or fighting brain fog would be helpful in filling the achievement gap we have.

    Anita does in count as a "school uniform" if most day all your kids are wearing stripped long Hanna pj's during lessons
    If I get "teacher uniform" credit for Capri leggings, a bright colored workout shirt, a pony tail and sandals!

    Leave a comment:

  • MaggieAnnie
    Senior Member

  • MaggieAnnie
    replied
    Re: teaching children to work well & to be prompt

    Oh thank you thank you thank you...perfect timing on this thread...
    I have been wracking my brain trying to figure out what to do with ds.

    Esp moving into 8th there is so much we can delve into in the fall he but has just been coasting the last year and I was unsure how to address it.

    Jude you cracked me up.
    I feel very blessed that I can laugh most days ...whoever says sorrow and joy can not journey together was most likely not a parent.

    He loves set schedules it never occurred to me to set an end time as well as a start time ..why didn't it?!
    He is one that is on task the moment he wakes, refuses to take breaks..I have to add movement breaks to his schedule... but he barely does the minimum work with out prompting...his goal is never really to do what ever work...it is just always to be finished...he does love checking off the boxes but then is at a loss what to do with himself. We need to help him see the benefit of the delving deeper but for him he is hyper focused on the process of moving forward...it is always "what is the next step" and never how can I really engage in what I am doing now.
    I like the idea of expected work to go through when his work is finished.

    The are so many periods where the bare minimum is all that is physically possible but it means we set our bar low to accommodate...but now we realize that it is not nearly enough challenge during times of health...but having a binder as you said to turn to when he is done with lessonwork and not needing to immediately sleep or fighting brain fog would be helpful in filling the achievement gap we have.

    Anita does in count as a "school uniform" if most day all your kids are wearing stripped long Hanna pj's during lessons

    Leave a comment:

  • serendipitous journey
    Senior Member

  • serendipitous journey
    replied
    Re: teaching children to work well & to be prompt

    Originally posted by SaintJude7 View Post
    Anita,
    ... My mother is...unique. I'm definitely open to adding on another mother figure in my life.
    Blessings,
    Jude

    DD 20, DS 17, DS 14, DS 12, DD 10, DS 7, DD 5
    Me, too. It would be terrific if Anita's mother is lovely & could be shared with you!

    Leave a comment:

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