Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

planning for a training-intensive puppy in the fall

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    planning for a training-intensive puppy in the fall

    Well, I am sure that a puppy won't be as time-consuming as a newborn! but have no idea how to think about planning for a new puppy this fall. We're going to pick up our labradoodle puppy mid-August, if all goes well; I think she will be a great addition to our home. I understand that this breed takes a good deal of training and am wondering how to think about adjusting our school schedule so that we all have time to play with & teach the puppy while staying on top of our academics & piano.

    I had thought to maybe start the boys at half-pace this summer? but that might be unnecessary. I don't want to be obsessive, but do want to plan well because my husband's travel really picks up in the fall and I need my older child especially to stay on track with his school.

    I'm grateful for advice!
    Ana, mama to
    ds A, 15 yo
    ds N, 10 yo

    #2
    Re: planning for a training-intensive puppy in the fall

    I'm a fan of year-round schooling anyway, as it avoids the need for all that review work in the fall. My husband has heavy travel the first six months of the year, so I know that is a time where things could easily snowball. I slow things down when necessary, hit it hard at our peak times, and we take off when we need to. Going half-pace now to prepare for an upcoming interruption in the flow of coursework is a great idea. Puppies may require less time than a newborn, but they have a great potential for destruction when bored. A newborn never chewed through our drywall or carpeting.
    Blessings,
    Jude

    DD 20, DS 17, DS 14, DS 12, DD 10, DS 7, DD 5
    DD24
    DS21
    DS18
    DS16
    DD14
    DS11
    DD9

    Comment


      #3
      Re: planning for a training-intensive puppy in the fall

      First, congrats on the upcoming four-legged addition to your family!

      Second, you are not being obsessive - you're being practical. We had an adorable puppy addition to our house two summers ago...and it was rough. (In our case, the adorable rescue puppy turned out to have very serious issues we were never apprised of until AFTER he became aggressive. But that's a whole other story entirely!) I knew puppies took lots of time and required a lot of work and attention in order to housetrain and such; however, like Jude said, they have needs beyond the basic housetraining/feeding/grooming and they will chew things or get into all sorts of mischief when bored. They won't just watch Baby Einstein in the swing when you need 10 minutes to teach a quick lesson. *weary laugh*

      Starting out at half pace is a great idea because you'll at least have that under your belt by the time Fido arrives. Then, you'll feel less pressure to get things done when Spot needs your attention, the kids will have time to play with and learn the routine for their new little bundle of fur and your puppy will have a better transition if the rest of you are feeling a bit more at ease with the rest of our schedule. You'll fall into a routine pretty quickly, but that first week or two can send you for a loop (kind of like a baby does, but it's different because you don't love that whining puppy at 2am the same way you loved that crying baby at the same time...and the baby didn't have to go outside in the rain at that hour).

      All that being said, I think you're going to love having a dog for your kids and you'll be right back at full speed in no time. I think you're being so smart by planning ahead so that you're not feeling frenzied.
      Mary

      DD15 - 9th core + CLRC Ancient Greek I & Latin IV + VideoText math
      DS12 - 7th core + Novare Earth Science + CLRC HS Latin I + VideoText math
      DD8 - SC level 2

      Comment


        #4
        Re: planning for a training-intensive puppy in the fall

        We just did this in April. We are raising a future guide dog that has very training-intensive needs. He came to us as a 9 week lab, and we took two weeks off as Spring Break to get used to having him in the house.
        We crate trained him in the beginning, which was amazingly helpful in that there was a limit to how much supervision he needed all the time. By now he is fairly trustworthy about housebreaking and chewing so he wanders around while we do school. I have had to schedule in a morning walk between lessons, and be intentional about taking frequent training breaks throughout the day.
        He was so sleepy that first month or so that he really didn't cause too many interruptions. Definitely easier than a newborn! I think you will find a natural-feeling routine soon. Enjoy!!!

        Comment


          #5
          Re: planning for a training-intensive puppy in the fall

          How fun!! We got an 8 week old goldendoodle puppy last October. It actually wasn't nearly as much work as I had thought. We picked him up a week into my husband's 6 week trip overseas (bad planning!!). We were well prepared and it really didn't affect our schooling / day to day life as much as I had thought it would. I had watched a TON of Zak George videos on puppies and puppy prep as well as training videos. The main concern was controlling his environment so we gated off the kitchen and made sure he was happy in his crate. He usually hung out in the kitchen napping while we did school but we also alternated breaks for the kids and sent the one not working out to play with the puppy.

          Good luck!!
          ~Michelle

          DD 13 (MP 8 - 4FL and Ref/Con through MPOA)
          DS 11 (MP 6 w/MPOA)
          DS 5 - MP K (My first Kindergartner with MP!!!)
          DD 2 - Board Books and Chaos

          Comment


            #6
            Re: planning for a training-intensive puppy in the fall

            Thank you so much for your perspective & suggestions!

            Based on this thread, I started our school 1/2-time yesterday, which has kept us busy. I think that will be the way to go. Already it is clear that there are some curriculum adjustments I need to make (common with my older child, especially) and it has always taken me a chunk of time to assemble a year that will actually work. Much better done before puppy arrives!

            Jude, you are helping me to not feel guilty about running school year-round. The older one sort of needs it, and it is clearly helpful for the littler guy too. In fact, I think our summer days need more structure even than I've been giving them, I think that our mornings will go better if they are "school-y" and then most or all of our afternoons can be more flexible.

            Mary, I'm so sorry your rescue puppy had serious aggression! We have heard similar stories from friends with two rescue dogs. I appreciate your BTDT advice. I do think that the puppy will be time-intensive for our household, esp. since my older child has emotional special needs (getting easier to handle each year, thank goodness) and requires a lot of structure himself. It is wonderful to hear that you think the dog will benefit the boys. That is the point, really! there are specific areas where I think raising a dog will bring great blessings ...

            Angela, your experience is so helpful to read: I like the idea of framing training breaks and walks. After subjects we often have a (rather flexible) cycle of short play break/piano song/next subject, and we can fit puppy training into our cycle and augment morning "recess" with a walk. That lets me have some idea of how to begin managing things. I like having some sort of Plan A. Even though we live on Plan C!

            Michelle, I hope I am as over-prepared as you were and things go as smoothly! I don't think I can easily cordon off our kitchen b/c of the open floor plan, but this helps me envision what we'll want to aim for to help manage puppy behavior proactively. And having boys alternate studying/puppy playing is a terrific idea.

            so much gratitude for y'all's help with this! I am much less worried now. I think it will be wonderful for the boys. I myself have PTSD-related sleeping problems, and am only just beginning to get a handle on them, but do think that adding a dog will be worth the adjustment. Particularly I'm wanting to build an emotional buffer b/c my husband's mother, who lives upstairs, is now in the "old old" phase of her life and I think that opening a space for more nurturing & affection & physical play will help the boys a lot in the next few years.
            Ana, mama to
            ds A, 15 yo
            ds N, 10 yo

            Comment


              #7
              Re: planning for a training-intensive puppy in the fall

              Late to the party (as per usual), but wanted to add:

              We got a Golden Retriever puppy almost 3 years ago. I’ve wanted one since I was 9 years old. It was a(n expensive) dream come true. Buuuuuut:

              *They eat everything. EVER-Y-THINN-G: socks, baseboards, coffee tables, baby wipes, toys, game board pieces, bar be ques, meat smokers, paper towels, napkins, basically anything that hits the floor.
              *They need to be walked. A lot.
              *They are bred to be companion dogs and are easily trainable (THANK GOD) but are still puppies until they are at least 18 months old. They really don’t stop jumping on people like slobbery idiots until they are around three
              *They will choke themselves on the leash whenever you try to train them to walk. Get a short leash. Seriously . Those leashes that let your dog roam? Those are not possible until your Golden mix is about 4 years old. Golden breeds don’t know a stranger or a boundary. Please please please do not let them go outside unsupervised. Our Golden has tried to go home with the UPS man, the mail carrier and the dry cleaning delivery person. He could give a fig about us if someone is friendly and brought cookies.
              * YOU WILL NEVER LOVE (OR DESPISE) ANOTHER ANIMAL THE WAY YOU DO THAT GOLDEN. They are (IMO) the best dogs on earth. Sweet, uncomplaining, friendly, goofy, submissive, sweet, affectionate, obedient, cheerful and beautiful. Plus, my kids can kick our dog, pull his ears, try to ride him around the house and basically treat him like a stuffed animal and he doesn’t care. The baby (16 months) lies down on him and he’s as gentle as a lamb. IT WAS NOT THIS WAY WHEN HE WAS A PUPPY! So watch his gnawing and nipping carfefully around your kids! But rest assured: it comes to an end. They don’t behave like furry goats forever.

              WE LOVE OUR GOLDEN. He is an amazing member of our family. They just take some training and patience.

              Congratulations!
              “If I should fall even a thousand times a day, a thousand times, with peaceful repentance, I will say immediately, Nunc Coepi, ‘Now, I begin.’.”

              ~Venerable Bruno Lanteri
              ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
              Boy Wonder 13 ...SC7/8 + MP4 + Rod & Staff 4/5 + Seton 5
              Joy Bubble 11 ...SC7/8 + MP4 + Rod & Staff 4/5 + Seton 5
              Cuddly Cowboy 9 ...SC7/8 + MP4 + Rod & Staff 3/4/5 + Seton 4
              Sassafras 5 ...MPK + Seton K

              Comment


                #8
                Re: planning for a training-intensive puppy in the fall

                Anita, thank you thank you thank you! okay, I'm afraid that I'm going to ignore the public service announcements thread and go multiple on the exclamation points: thank you!!!

                What a blessing, to read your post. We are in the middle of things and I am tired and wishing that I _liked_ our dog more (she is a lovely puppy, but still a puppy). Everything you wrote makes sense and helps me feel better about where we are! Especially about the nipping ... I mentioned to one of the women at church (who happens to be a vet) that when we first got the puppy she nipped my boys and we were having to work hard on training because of this: she was concerned that I had a psycho dog. Sigh. No, just a 10-week-old labradoodle.

                She hardly ever nips now, but when she does, it is my sweet, sensitive youngest. Good grief!

                And it is slowing down our school year. Keeping me from being able to sit with the boys during piano practice. Taking precious time from my DH. So, hearing your encouragement and your reminder to be patient and keep training is music to my ears. Beautiful medieval chant music, sustaining & providing a vision of glories to come.

                thanks!
                Ana, mama to
                ds A, 15 yo
                ds N, 10 yo

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: planning for a training-intensive puppy in the fall

                  Originally posted by serendipitous journey View Post
                  Anita, thank you thank you thank you! okay, I'm afraid that I'm going to ignore the public service announcements thread and go multiple on the exclamation points: thank you!!!

                  What a blessing, to read your post. We are in the middle of things and I am tired and wishing that I _liked_ our dog more (she is a lovely puppy, but still a puppy). Everything you wrote makes sense and helps me feel better about where we are! Especially about the nipping ... I mentioned to one of the women at church (who happens to be a vet) that when we first got the puppy she nipped my boys and we were having to work hard on training because of this: she was concerned that I had a psycho dog. Sigh. No, just a 10-week-old labradoodle.

                  She hardly ever nips now, but when she does, it is my sweet, sensitive youngest. Good grief!

                  And it is slowing down our school year. Keeping me from being able to sit with the boys during piano practice. Taking precious time from my DH. So, hearing your encouragement and your reminder to be patient and keep training is music to my ears. Beautiful medieval chant music, sustaining & providing a vision of glories to come.

                  thanks!
                  LOLOL! Most welcome, dear one!

                  My oldest was shy of the dog (the nipping) and would inadvertently tease him with his sleeve. He would try to pet him but the dog would try to nip his fingers, so he would pull his hand back and the dog thought he was playing. More nipping. So my son would pull his sleeve down over the end of his hand to protect his fingers. Holes in sleeves. So the rule was, “Put up your sleeves, hands behind your back.” (Or arms crossed.) At that time, my son, who was 6, still had pretty major comprehension deficits. So I vividly remember (ahem) screaming “SLEEVES UP! Cross your ARRRRMS!” because I was practically panicked that the dog would hurt him. AGAIN — not from malice! They’re puppies! Puppies nip! They won’t do it forever. It generally ends by the time their permanent teeth come in. (Oh, and their baby teeth will fall out, just like little kids, so don’t freak out. My husband was playing tug with our Golden when he was a puppy and came away with a bloody tooth. I heard it hit the floor and was stunned.)

                  * Don’t let your kids lie down on the floor to wrestle with the dog. My oldest did this. And the dog took it as submission and playfully pinned him several times.
                  * If he has issues jumping on strangers, advise them to cross their arms and turn their back. He’ll calm down in a minute.
                  * GET HIM TOYS. BUT NOT JUST ANY TOYS. Goldens can eat through steel. The only — ONLY! — toys we’ve found that last are from Nylabone, certain Kong toys (really, the classic Kong is the only one that held up), but the king of toys rating goes to Starmark. (All these recommendations can be purchased at PetSmart) Starmark are treat balls that you can put dog biscuits, peanut butter or treats inside. Your dog has to figure out how to get it out. It keeps them busy, gives them something to chew, and is hilarious to watch. Goldens are really smart, too, which has meant watching lots of ingenious processes the dog employs to get that treat out of that ball! (We call it his “squishy”. He STILL loves to gnaw on it.) Starmark looks expensive, because it kind of is. But listen: HE NEEDS TO BE KEPT BUSY. And all those toys that are “indestructible” are like potato chips to a Golden. Ours can destroy an “indestructible” toy in less than ten minutes. Starmark is worth it’s weight in gold. We got a medium/small red one when he was a puppy — that finally died a few weeks ago when I ran over it with the mower — but now this is his favorite:
                  https://www.amazon.com/StarMark-Ever.../dp/B005VVMU56
                  He has a purple one in a slightly different shape, too. Don’t buy the treats that come with them. They do last awhile, but they gave my Golden the runs when he was a puppy. (Stay away from much of anything with a high grain content if you don’t like cleaning up loose puppy poo. Purina One Large Breed Puppy food was my go to until he was 2. Now we still buy it, but in the adult formula.)

                  I could go on forever, but bottom line: he will not do this forever. There’s nothing wrong with your dog. He will not ever hurt your children on purpose. He will not eat EVERYTHING WITHIN MOUTH REACH (argh!) forever. He is going to be a FANTASTIC DOG. He’s just a baby. Remember when your kids are toddlers and their job is to open every cabinet, flush every toilet, unroll paper towels and throw shoes in the trash? You have that with four legs. It passes. Some day you’ll look back on this time with fond memories. (If you survive )
                  “If I should fall even a thousand times a day, a thousand times, with peaceful repentance, I will say immediately, Nunc Coepi, ‘Now, I begin.’.”

                  ~Venerable Bruno Lanteri
                  ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
                  Boy Wonder 13 ...SC7/8 + MP4 + Rod & Staff 4/5 + Seton 5
                  Joy Bubble 11 ...SC7/8 + MP4 + Rod & Staff 4/5 + Seton 5
                  Cuddly Cowboy 9 ...SC7/8 + MP4 + Rod & Staff 3/4/5 + Seton 4
                  Sassafras 5 ...MPK + Seton K

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X