Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Advice on teaching to read

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Advice on teaching to read

    I have a 4 1/2 year old that I will be starting in K this fall, though she does not turn 5 until November. I'm aware that it is not always prudent to have an "young" Kindergartener, but I have assessed her ability to learn and she possesses all the requirements to start- including a thirst to learn! I've considered and will most likely start her schooling this fall at a snails pace just to see how it all goes and how well she does. Not to mention, we have a big overseas move back to the states right in the middle of the school year that will cause our routine to change drastically!

    My question is, for weeks now, she has been begging me to teach her to read. I've been showing her how to blend letter sounds to form some words but have not done anything formal to teach her. I would love to start the reading/phonics segment of the K-core now, but wonder if I would be "jumping the gun" to do so? I know I could teach her sight words as I've seen many pre-schoolers do, but my preference would be to add those as we go. Thoughts? I don't want to start too early, but she seems very eager and ready!

    Thank you!

    #2
    Re: Advice on teaching to read

    I have a son who turned 4 about a week and a half ago. He just started reading about a month or so ago. He loves it and thinks it is great fun, but he has to be in the mood. We started out playing with letter tiles (think bananagrams) and switching out tiles to make different words. I personally would make sure she knows all the short vowel sounds and the consanant sounds. If you have the classical phonics book that could be a place to start for picking appropriate words to start working on.

    Good luck and I look forward to other comments.
    Dorinda

    For 2019-2020
    DD 16 - 11th with MPOA(AP Latin), Lukeion (Greek4 & Adv. NT Greek), Thinkwell (Economics and Chemistry), plus Pre-Calculus, American G’ment, Early Church History set, and British Lit
    DS 14 - 8th with MPOA(Fourth Form), CLRC(Intro Lit and Comp), plus Algebra, Field Biology, Classical Studies 1
    DS 11 - 6th with Right Start Level G online class
    DS 6 - 1st with Prima Latina

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Advice on teaching to read

      Originally posted by jturpin View Post
      I have a 4 1/2 year old that I will be starting in K this fall, though she does not turn 5 until November. I'm aware that it is not always prudent to have an "young" Kindergartener, but I have assessed her ability to learn and she possesses all the requirements to start- including a thirst to learn! I've considered and will most likely start her schooling this fall at a snails pace just to see how it all goes and how well she does. Not to mention, we have a big overseas move back to the states right in the middle of the school year that will cause our routine to change drastically!

      My question is, for weeks now, she has been begging me to teach her to read. I've been showing her how to blend letter sounds to form some words but have not done anything formal to teach her. I would love to start the reading/phonics segment of the K-core now, but wonder if I would be "jumping the gun" to do so? I know I could teach her sight words as I've seen many pre-schoolers do, but my preference would be to add those as we go. Thoughts? I don't want to start too early, but she seems very eager and ready!

      Thank you!
      I guess the bigger question is she ready to write? FSR is difficult because of the writing aspect. FSRA, in particular is rather easy. It moves slow. However, it does pick up speed quickly. Also know that blending is a developmental skill, some may be 5.5 before they can do this, without a fight. My oldest, who does have some learning issues could not blend at 5. However, she knew the sounds all the letters made..could put them in the correct position. (beginning, middle, end) It was extremely frustrating, because she wanted to read! I purposely waited with my son. We just started FSRA at 5.5 and he is doing beautifully! It has been a much different situation! (and he wasn't even proficient with all the sounds the letters make like my older daughter!)

      I like Dorinda's suggestion of gently teaching your child to read right now.

      Of course you can always try FSR now and see how it goes. If you find that she can't handle all the writing (if you are doing it all orally), I would set it aside and try again later. I would make sure you are doing all the activities. You can go slowly, but you don't want to go too slow either. It's a fine balance!

      A third option is doing the First Start reading with the Simply Classical 1 phonics plans. If gives you a few additional tactile/sensory activities and goes just a tad slower than the K plans.

      I have a 4 year old (she was 4 in Feb) and she is probably close to also being able to start FSR and I'm really on the fence about it myself! I think we will spend the next few months working on the letter formation and she can listen in on her brother's phonics lessons. She may start FSR in late Fall.

      I will say that when my oldest was this age, I definitely "pushed" a little to much, because she was an eager learner! I was a bit more relaxed with my son (who is also a boy and that makes a difference) and he will probably come out the same, even though we started a little later with him!

      P.S. - I have a friend who taught her child to read at 4, using fridge magnets... It can be done! I just don't know that starting the K core is totally necessary, yet. You can teach reading, and wait a bit on FSR.

      thisreadingmama has some bob book printable and other sources for teaching reading. However, my head starts to spin a bit, because there is so much!
      Christine

      (2019/2020)
      DD1 8/23/09 - SC5/6
      DS2 9/1/11 - SC3,4, 5/6 combo
      DD3 2/9/13 -SC2 to start, MP1 second semester

      Previous Years
      DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4’
      DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2)
      DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK)

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Advice on teaching to read

        If she is ready to write, I don't see a problem starting with FSR A and just taking it at her pace. We did this with my 4.5 year old dd (turned 5 in March) this past school year. Some days we did a full page, some days it was half a page, some days she just needed a break. She's in Book C now and actually asks to be allowed to do both dictation pages at the same time and often does the more intensive word ending lessons all on the same day instead of breaking them up into 3 or 4 days. We did switch to the SC1 plans at around Week 8 as the movement activities were helpful for her, even though we didn't do all of them. They are available as Individual Plans (Simply Classical Level 1 Phonics).

        I originally started her on Classical Phonics, but she wanted to write in the FSR books like her older siblings. If your daughter isn't ready to write, then definitely start with Classical Phonics. If she is ready to write, start with FSR A at her pace, but no more than the usual assignment for a given day. Too much excitement/doing lots of pages will lead to burnout on her part even if she's begging to do them. It's our job to set the boundaries so they learn how to pace themselves from the beginning.

        HTH!
        Jennifer
        Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

        DS16
        MP: Lit 10, VideoText Algebra
        MPOA: High School Comp. II
        HSC: Spanish I, Conceptual Physics, Modern European History, and electives

        DS15
        MP: Biology, Lit 10, VideoText Algebra, Greek Tragedies
        MPOA: High School Comp. II, Fourth Form Latin
        HSC: Modern European History

        DS12
        7M with:
        Second Form Latin, EGR III, and HSC for US History

        DS11
        SC Level 4

        DD9
        3A, with First Form Latin (long story!)

        DD7/8
        Still in SC Level 2

        DD 4/5
        SC Level C

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Advice on teaching to read

          I love the eagerness of a four year old, and I love making the most of that by starting very simple lessons on learning to read. Letter tiles, fridge magnets, alphabet flashcards, blocks with letters on them, alphabet puzzles - these are all things that you can use right now to have some focused time every day that you teach the names of the letters, and the principal sounds each letter makes (leave out soft c, soft g, anything other than short vowel sounds, etc). With a young child, there is a LOT of forward progress with sliding backward. They will seem to be doing great, and then you hit a week where he/she does not seem to remember anything!

          This is why spending a lot of time, with lots of repetition, will help really get the ball rolling on early phonics. Once the main sounds have been mastered, you can begin simple blending with the same materials you have been using. You can also add in the Classical Phonics book as a way to have lists of words with which to practice blending. Do not expect to get far in the book, and you don't need to spend more than 5 to 10 minutes on practicing from it. Finding many ways to keep going over the same things is going to be more fruitful than trying to cover more material quickly.

          This work that you do now will really help make starting K in the fall a smooth transition, and a delightful experience.

          AMDG,
          Sarah
          2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
          DD, 18, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
          DS, 16
          DD, 14
          DD, 12
          DD, 10
          DD, 7.5
          DD, 5.5
          +DS+
          DS, 18 months

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Advice on teaching to read

            Originally posted by Mom2mthj View Post
            I have a son who turned 4 about a week and a half ago. He just started reading about a month or so ago. He loves it and thinks it is great fun, but he has to be in the mood. We started out playing with letter tiles (think bananagrams) and switching out tiles to make different words. I personally would make sure she knows all the short vowel sounds and the consanant sounds. If you have the classical phonics book that could be a place to start for picking appropriate words to start working on.

            Good luck and I look forward to other comments.
            Using banana grams tiles is a great idea! She knows her letter sounds, so that's a start!

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Advice on teaching to read

              Originally posted by howiecram View Post
              I guess the bigger question is she ready to write? FSR is difficult because of the writing aspect. FSRA, in particular is rather easy. It moves slow. However, it does pick up speed quickly. Also know that blending is a developmental skill, some may be 5.5 before they can do this, without a fight. My oldest, who does have some learning issues could not blend at 5. However, she knew the sounds all the letters made..could put them in the correct position. (beginning, middle, end) It was extremely frustrating, because she wanted to read! I purposely waited with my son. We just started FSRA at 5.5 and he is doing beautifully! It has been a much different situation! (and he wasn't even proficient with all the sounds the letters make like my older daughter!)

              I like Dorinda's suggestion of gently teaching your child to read right now.

              Of course you can always try FSR now and see how it goes. If you find that she can't handle all the writing (if you are doing it all orally), I would set it aside and try again later. I would make sure you are doing all the activities. You can go slowly, but you don't want to go too slow either. It's a fine balance!

              A third option is doing the First Start reading with the Simply Classical 1 phonics plans. If gives you a few additional tactile/sensory activities and goes just a tad slower than the K plans.

              I have a 4 year old (she was 4 in Feb) and she is probably close to also being able to start FSR and I'm really on the fence about it myself! I think we will spend the next few months working on the letter formation and she can listen in on her brother's phonics lessons. She may start FSR in late Fall.

              I will say that when my oldest was this age, I definitely "pushed" a little to much, because she was an eager learner! I was a bit more relaxed with my son (who is also a boy and that makes a difference) and he will probably come out the same, even though we started a little later with him!

              P.S. - I have a friend who taught her child to read at 4, using fridge magnets... It can be done! I just don't know that starting the K core is totally necessary, yet. You can teach reading, and wait a bit on FSR.

              thisreadingmama has some bob book printable and other sources for teaching reading. However, my head starts to spin a bit, because there is so much!
              Good advice, thank you! I will look into the Simply Classical phonics!

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Advice on teaching to read

                Originally posted by jen1134 View Post
                If she is ready to write, I don't see a problem starting with FSR A and just taking it at her pace. We did this with my 4.5 year old dd (turned 5 in March) this past school year. Some days we did a full page, some days it was half a page, some days she just needed a break. She's in Book C now and actually asks to be allowed to do both dictation pages at the same time and often does the more intensive word ending lessons all on the same day instead of breaking them up into 3 or 4 days. We did switch to the SC1 plans at around Week 8 as the movement activities were helpful for her, even though we didn't do all of them. They are available as Individual Plans (Simply Classical Level 1 Phonics).

                I originally started her on Classical Phonics, but she wanted to write in the FSR books like her older siblings. If your daughter isn't ready to write, then definitely start with Classical Phonics. If she is ready to write, start with FSR A at her pace, but no more than the usual assignment for a given day. Too much excitement/doing lots of pages will lead to burnout on her part even if she's begging to do them. It's our job to set the boundaries so they learn how to pace themselves from the beginning.

                HTH!
                Thank you! Loved what you said "It's our job to set the boundaries so they learn how to pace themselves from the beginning." Something I've never thought of before!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Advice on teaching to read

                  Originally posted by KF2000 View Post
                  I love the eagerness of a four year old, and I love making the most of that by starting very simple lessons on learning to read. Letter tiles, fridge magnets, alphabet flashcards, blocks with letters on them, alphabet puzzles - these are all things that you can use right now to have some focused time every day that you teach the names of the letters, and the principal sounds each letter makes (leave out soft c, soft g, anything other than short vowel sounds, etc). With a young child, there is a LOT of forward progress with sliding backward. They will seem to be doing great, and then you hit a week where he/she does not seem to remember anything!

                  This is why spending a lot of time, with lots of repetition, will help really get the ball rolling on early phonics. Once the main sounds have been mastered, you can begin simple blending with the same materials you have been using. You can also add in the Classical Phonics book as a way to have lists of words with which to practice blending. Do not expect to get far in the book, and you don't need to spend more than 5 to 10 minutes on practicing from it. Finding many ways to keep going over the same things is going to be more fruitful than trying to cover more material quickly.

                  This work that you do now will really help make starting K in the fall a smooth transition, and a delightful experience.

                  AMDG,
                  Sarah
                  Thank you, this is sound advice. She knows how to write her letters and all of the names in our family and her close friends. She also knows all her letter sounds, although her name (Genesis) has the soft g sound, so that was a little confusing at first, lol! I will take a look at the Classical Phonics book!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Advice on teaching to read

                    We had a similar issue with our daughter, Gianna.

                    Sounds like you are in good shape! Summer will go quickly...and those extra three months can make a big difference in readiness.

                    AMDG,
                    Sarah
                    2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
                    DD, 18, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
                    DS, 16
                    DD, 14
                    DD, 12
                    DD, 10
                    DD, 7.5
                    DD, 5.5
                    +DS+
                    DS, 18 months

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Advice on teaching to read

                      I did the same thing as you're planning. My daughter started k at 4.5. She did it marvelously, as written. We waited to start math until the fall.

                      So, she finished k phonics this january. She has about 10 lessons left in math. She did Simply Classical 2 cursive with my older son. Her fine motor skills are far better than his. Her cursive is beautiful.

                      My plan was to do Simply Classical Storytime Treasures with them both together this spring. But, her fluency was just not quite there yet. Remember, there's FSR E to do between k and 1st. So, we slowed down. My son went on to do Storytime. My daughter is working through SC2 first semester reading with the Moose Moments readers.

                      It's just what she needed to improve her fluency. This will also allow her to do FSR E this summer and start 1st in the fall as written.

                      The short: she really really wanted to read, so we did it. She needed a gap semester this spring and we filled it with extra reading as scheduled in Simply Classical level 2. She'll do FSR E this summer and start 1st in the fall.
                      Married to DH for 14 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

                      DS11- Simply Classical 5/6
                      DD9- Simply Classical 5/6 (neurotypical, but schooling with big brother to save mom's sanity)
                      DD 6- Classic Core First Grade

                      We've completed:
                      Classic Core Jr. kindergarten, kindergarten, first grade, and second grade.
                      Simply Classical levels B, C, 1, 2, 3, and 4.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Advice on teaching to read

                        Originally posted by Colomama View Post
                        I did the same thing as you're planning. My daughter started k at 4.5. She did it marvelously, as written. We waited to start math until the fall.

                        So, she finished k phonics this january. She has about 10 lessons left in math. She did Simply Classical 2 cursive with my older son. Her fine motor skills are far better than his. Her cursive is beautiful.

                        My plan was to do Simply Classical Storytime Treasures with them both together this spring. But, her fluency was just not quite there yet. Remember, there's FSR E to do between k and 1st. So, we slowed down. My son went on to do Storytime. My daughter is working through SC2 first semester reading with the Moose Moments readers.

                        It's just what she needed to improve her fluency. This will also allow her to do FSR E this summer and start 1st in the fall as written.

                        The short: she really really wanted to read, so we did it. She needed a gap semester this spring and we filled it with extra reading as scheduled in Simply Classical level 2. She'll do FSR E this summer and start 1st in the fall.
                        Yes!!! I was wondering how it would work out with starting reading now, and the rest of the core in the fall as scheduled. I feel like I need to write this down, it seems as if this will be exactly what we will be going through. Looking up the SC2 now....

                        Thank you!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: Advice on teaching to read

                          She's only doing the Moose Moments reading, not the Core Skills Phonics workbooks or anything else.

                          I decided on this route because I can see long term the benefit of not having to tweak a core. She'll be able to do grade 1 as written.
                          Married to DH for 14 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

                          DS11- Simply Classical 5/6
                          DD9- Simply Classical 5/6 (neurotypical, but schooling with big brother to save mom's sanity)
                          DD 6- Classic Core First Grade

                          We've completed:
                          Classic Core Jr. kindergarten, kindergarten, first grade, and second grade.
                          Simply Classical levels B, C, 1, 2, 3, and 4.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X