Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Latin Forms vs Henle

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Latin Forms vs Henle

    Hello. Is there a scope & sequence of the Latin books somewhere?

    I'm trying to determine the differences between Henle and the Form series.

    Thank you.

    #2
    Re: Latin Forms vs Henle

    I'll leave the scope/sequence question to the MP staff, but it would be helpful to know the age of the child for which you are researching. That will heavily influence a recommendation.

    Generally, I can tell you that First through Fourth Form is the entire Latin grammar. Upon completion of Fourth Form you are ready to move into Henle II/Caesar. If your child is younger, the Forms lay out the same content but in a more systematic way, with much more practice, than Henle. There are also the teaching DVDs, which are most helpful if the parent/teacher does not know Latin him/herself.

    An older child (high school) may benefit from diving into Henle instead of the Forms to fast track grammar into a year, but that's a busy year! You might look into the online academy if you are in this position.

    If you can tell us a little more, I think we can get you everything you need to make a good decision.
    Festina lentē,
    Jessica P

    2020-2021
    11th year HSing · 9th year MP
    @ Home, HLN, & Latin online
    11th, 9th, 6th, 3rd

    Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Latin Forms vs Henle

      Originally posted by pickandgrin View Post
      I'll leave the scope/sequence question to the MP staff, but it would be helpful to know the age of the child for which you are researching. That will heavily influence a recommendation.

      Generally, I can tell you that First through Fourth Form is the entire Latin grammar. Upon completion of Fourth Form you are ready to move into Henle II/Caesar. If your child is younger, the Forms lay out the same content but in a more systematic way, with much more practice, than Henle. There are also the teaching DVDs, which are most helpful if the parent/teacher does not know Latin him/herself.

      An older child (high school) may benefit from diving into Henle instead of the Forms to fast track grammar into a year, but that's a busy year! You might look into the online academy if you are in this position.

      If you can tell us a little more, I think we can get you everything you need to make a good decision.
      Thanks. You've actually been very helpful to me before...I remember your name!

      My son is in 7th grade and 1/2 way through 2nd form. He is basically hating Latin right now (so, no, I'm not putting him in Henle!), but I'm trying to work with what we've done so far and try to find ways to supplement. I see a lot of things that indicate how other programs line up to Henle or where in their sequence you would get to Henle, so I'm trying to see where the forms line up with that, so I can see what is covered everywhere. I don't want too much to be duplicated, but I don't wants gaps either. I'm not sure I'm leaving the forms series, but possibly supplementing with some reading materials (maybe Cambridge...not sure).

      Anyway, I'm just trying to see what is covered everywhere. Personally, I'm a fan of the forms sequence because it's easy to teach!

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Latin Forms vs Henle

        Hello there!

        Trying to "find" the same content in Henle as what is in the Forms will be challenging, because the set-up of the programs is quite different. The folks at MP can probably guide you well, but my guess is there would be a lot of looking at table of contents to look for the explanations that you need.

        That being said, if you are only halfway through Second Form, it would not be much of a loss of time to switch if you want. My kids both did First Form before going into Henle I and were very successful. FFL gave them the "sense" of how Latin works, so that when they started out in Henle, it all made sense right from the beginning.

        The reason Henle might suit your son better is that there is more context to what he learns in the grammar. Students begin to translate a lot sooner, so right away they are using Latin more than they do in the Forms. This difference is on purpose; the Forms are helpful for younger students who are not yet ready for the analytical work of translating. So it is good an appropriate to hold off on that. But your son may be impatient to just be doing grammar, grammar, grammar. If this is the case, then Henle might suit him well.

        My son was 10 when he started Henle I, and he absolutely fell in love with Latin. It can be a really good fit for some kids.

        AMDG,
        Sarah
        2020-2021
        16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
        DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
        DS, 16
        DD, 14
        DD, 12
        DD, 10
        DD, 8
        DD, 6
        +DS+
        DS, 2

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Latin Forms vs Henle

          Originally posted by KF2000 View Post
          Hello there!

          Trying to "find" the same content in Henle as what is in the Forms will be challenging, because the set-up of the programs is quite different. The folks at MP can probably guide you well, but my guess is there would be a lot of looking at table of contents to look for the explanations that you need.

          That being said, if you are only halfway through Second Form, it would not be much of a loss of time to switch if you want. My kids both did First Form before going into Henle I and were very successful. FFL gave them the "sense" of how Latin works, so that when they started out in Henle, it all made sense right from the beginning.

          The reason Henle might suit your son better is that there is more context to what he learns in the grammar. Students begin to translate a lot sooner, so right away they are using Latin more than they do in the Forms. This difference is on purpose; the Forms are helpful for younger students who are not yet ready for the analytical work of translating. So it is good an appropriate to hold off on that. But your son may be impatient to just be doing grammar, grammar, grammar. If this is the case, then Henle might suit him well.

          My son was 10 when he started Henle I, and he absolutely fell in love with Latin. It can be a really good fit for some kids.

          AMDG,
          Sarah

          Interesting perspective! Yes, I am thinking that translating will help him. The grammar is dry. My 4th grader is doing fantastic in FFL, but he is a different kid. My older son is a gifted math kiddo, so he can do the analytical, but he wants to "use" Latin.

          Thank you for your input. Definitely something to think about!

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Latin Forms vs Henle

            Great advice from Sarah--here are some other ideas for staying with the Forms, but expanding on Latin:

            --National Latin Exam: That opportunity may have passed this year (I think cut off has passed), but there are online practice tests at here: http://nle.org/exams.html#previousexam
            You'd be ready for the Intro Level (the first two pages you print, plus the key is the 9th page--or next to last). Those are really fun. My kids have enjoyed "competing" against themselves and applying Latin in a completely different context than the forms.

            --Lingua Latina. Warning: This is not a recommendation to use it as a text. This is a recommendation to use it for fun. It's fun to sit down and try to "sight read" Latin. It shows you how much you've learned and how far there is to go. This is both encouraging and humbling. It whets your appetite for more.

            --Books in Latin: Cat in the Hat, Harry Potter, Hobbit, etc. Libraries usually have copies of at least a few of these. Fun to page through and see what you can recognize.

            --Flashcard game with random words: https://classicalacademicpress.com/p...lashcard-game/

            --MPOA? If this is in your budget, a really inspiring teacher can enliven things greatly. NOT to say that you're not a really inspiring teacher--I mean mostly a non-parent. Ha! My son started MPOA this year with Third Form with Mr. King. I cannot recommend Mr. King too highly. He's fantastic. Class listings and teacher bios (click their name) here: https://www.memoriapressacademy.com/...ird-form-latin
            Meredith Cutrer is also fantastic--just look at what she's studied/studying. Amazing. Being with other kids diligently learning Latin can be transformative, especially if your child is feeling like his parents are complete odd-balls because "who else my age is studying Latin, anyway?" Apparently--loads of fun kids are. The proof is in MPOA.

            Sorry this is slapped together so quickly--it's GORGEOUS here today and homeschool is like herding cats. Onward!
            Festina lentē,
            Jessica P

            2020-2021
            11th year HSing · 9th year MP
            @ Home, HLN, & Latin online
            11th, 9th, 6th, 3rd

            Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Latin Forms vs Henle

              Originally posted by tmstranger View Post
              My older son is a gifted math kiddo, so he can do the analytical, but he wants to "use" Latin.

              Thank you for your input. Definitely something to think about!
              Yes, same here. I did not know that would be the case when we tried Henle (I was motivated by cost at the time!), but it did prove to be the exact right fit for him. He is also very musically inclined - all parts of the same picture, I think. Plus, all the material they are translating is about Rome, soldiering, courage, etc. Very edifying.

              Hope you figure things out!
              AMDG,
              Sarah
              2020-2021
              16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
              DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
              DS, 16
              DD, 14
              DD, 12
              DD, 10
              DD, 8
              DD, 6
              +DS+
              DS, 2

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Latin Forms vs Henle

                Just my opinion, but Cambridge is very difficult to teach grammar from, especially if you don't have a decent mastery of Latin yourself. I used Cambridge as a kid, but it was heavily supplemented with much more structured grammar study, and I had a really phenomenal teacher who was able to pull it all together.

                That said, it is encouraging to be able to see that you can read something in Latin, and the continuous story line in Cambridge is engaging. Also, the sections on Roman civilization are interesting. I hadn't considered using Cambridge as a supplement to Forms, but now that you mention it, I just might pull out my old books and see how my kiddos like it - you know, bedtime reading and whatnot
                Amanda - Mama to three crazy boys (7A, 6M, 2), classics major

                "Non nisi te, Domine. Non nisi te" - St. Thomas Aquinas

                Comment

                Working...
                X