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EGR II - lesson 9, compound subject and verb

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    EGR II - lesson 9, compound subject and verb

    First of all, I wish the grammar question would give a definition of what a compound subject/verb is instead of giving examples only 🙂.
    Question: are we to underline the simple subject or the complete subject in Practice A??, some of the sentences (teacher's guide) include just the simple subject while others include an adjective. Examples:

    * sentence 2: citrus fruit, only fruit is underlined
    * sentence 4: prickly pear cactus, everything is underlined.

    Also, why is the verb "stuck" not underlined in sentence 3, Practice B?
    Thanks!
    MG
    Last edited by MG_; 11-09-2016, 04:01 PM.
    ***Using some 5A and 8A MP materials for 2020-2021***

    #2
    Re: EGR II - lesson 9, compound subject and verb

    Originally posted by MG_ View Post
    First of all, I wish the grammar question would give a definition of what a compound subject/verb is instead of giving examples only 🙂.
    Question: are we to underline the simple subject or the complete subject in Practice A??, some of the sentences (teacher's guide) include just the simple subject while others include an adjective. Examples:

    * sentence 2: citrus fruit, only fruit is underlined
    * sentence 4: prickly pear cactus, everything is underlined.

    Thanks!
    MG
    A compound subject has two or more simple subjects (plus any modifiers) that are joined by a conjunction.
    A compound verb is two or more words that together function as a single verb. A compound predicate is when a sentence has two or more verbs.

    For Practice A, since students are learning about compound subjects, I would have them underline each simple subject in the sentence, so they can easily see whether or not the sentence has a compound subject.

    Does that help?

    ETA: Just saw your edit. Could you give the directions for Practice B and the full sentence? I am not in the office this week and don't have access to EGR. Thanks!

    Comment


      #3
      Re: EGR II - lesson 9, compound subject and verb

      I think that "prickly pear cactus" is underlined because it is actually the name of a type of cactus, but "fruit" is only underlined because "citrus" is an adjective describing the fruit but not a part of the name of a fruit. Does that make any sense at all? I know what I want to say, but I'm struggling to find the words!

      Tanya

      Comment


        #4
        Re: EGR II - lesson 9, compound subject and verb

        Originally posted by Michael View Post
        A compound subject has two or more simple subjects (plus any modifiers) that are joined by a conjunction.
        A compound verb is two or more words that together function as a single verb. A compound predicate is when a sentence has two or more verbs.

        For Practice A, since students are learning about compound subjects, I would have them underline each simple subject in the sentence, so they can easily see whether or not the sentence has a compound subject.

        Does that help?

        ETA: Just saw your edit. Could you give the directions for Practice B and the full sentence? I am not in the office this week and don't have access to EGR. Thanks!
        Michael, Thank you for taking the time to respond!!!

        Let's see...according to EGR II, the Simple Subject is "...the principal word the sentence is about.", and the Complete Subject is "...the simple subject with all its modifiers".

        So, that would make the Compound Subject per your definition, two or more Simple OR Complete subjects that are joined by a conjunction?, but for illustration purposes, we can just ask our student to underline the pure "Simple Subject".

        Then, Sentence 4.: "The prickly pear cactus and the yucca tree grow in the desert." Prickly Pear Cactus is underlined because is the Simple Subject (proper name), and yucca tree because it is a Complete Subject (adj.+ simple subject).?

        If that is the case, the answers in the Teacher's Guide may not be too helpful in this particular case:

        Sentence2: Wheat, olives, and citrus fruit grow in Greece today.
        Should "citrus" be underlined?

        and, Sentence 9: Five smooth stones and a sling were the only weapons David wanted.
        Should "five smooth" be underlined?

        -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        PRACTICE B: Underline the compound verb in each sentence. Note: A few sentences have a compound subject and a compund verb.

        3. Susan saw the poor kitten stuck in the tree and called for help.
        "stuck" is not underlined. Is it because is not connected to "Susan" but to the "kitten"?

        -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        ***Using some 5A and 8A MP materials for 2020-2021***

        Comment


          #5
          Re: EGR II - lesson 9, compound subject and verb

          Originally posted by tanya View Post
          I think that "prickly pear cactus" is underlined because it is actually the name of a type of cactus, but "fruit" is only underlined because "citrus" is an adjective describing the fruit but not a part of the name of a fruit. Does that make any sense at all? I know what I want to say, but I'm struggling to find the words!

          Tanya
          Thank you for explaining it this way! I did not know about the prickly pear cactus!
          ***Using some 5A and 8A MP materials for 2020-2021***

          Comment


            #6
            Re: EGR II - lesson 9, compound subject and verb

            Originally posted by MG_ View Post
            Thank you for explaining it this way! I did not know about the prickly pear cactus!
            Yes, in explaining the different types of subjects, I neglected to answer your actual question, so thank you, Tanya! Her explanation also works for "yucca tree." Both "prickly pear cactus" and "yucca tree" are simple subjects. For "citrus tree," that is not the name of a specific type of tree, so that is why "citrus" is not underlined. Same for "five smooth stones." "Citrus," "five," and "smooth" are simply adjectives (modifiers).

            For compound subjects, maybe a better way of thinking of it is as a name for a "type" of subject, if that makes sense. Let's use the compound subject in sentence 9 as an example. We could break it down into two simple subjects ("stones" and "sling") or we could add in all the modifiers ("five smooth stones" and "a sling"). If you were asked to underline the complete subject of sentence 9, it would be Five smooth stones and a sling. There are not two separate complete subjects. In other words, the complete subject *is* a compound subject. It's a both/and situation. Does that make more sense?

            Thus, in the examples in your post, only the simple subjects are underlined. Because there are two or more simple subjects in each sentence, we know the sentences have compound subjects. Does that make the Teacher's Guide clearer?

            Finally, for sentence 3 of Practice B, "stuck" is acting as an *adjective* in that sentence. It answers the question, "Which kitten?" (The *stuck* kitten.) The fancy name for this is a "participle," or verbal adjective. It is formed from a verb, but it is not used as a verb.

            Comment


              #7
              Re: EGR II - lesson 9, compound subject and verb

              Originally posted by Michael View Post
              Yes, in explaining the different types of subjects, I neglected to answer your actual question, so thank you, Tanya! Her explanation also works for "yucca tree." Both "prickly pear cactus" and "yucca tree" are simple subjects. For "citrus tree," that is not the name of a specific type of tree, so that is why "citrus" is not underlined. Same for "five smooth stones." "Citrus," "five," and "smooth" are simply adjectives (modifiers).

              For compound subjects, maybe a better way of thinking of it is as a name for a "type" of subject, if that makes sense. Let's use the compound subject in sentence 9 as an example. We could break it down into two simple subjects ("stones" and "sling") or we could add in all the modifiers ("five smooth stones" and "a sling"). If you were asked to underline the complete subject of sentence 9, it would be Five smooth stones and a sling. There are not two separate complete subjects. In other words, the complete subject *is* a compound subject. It's a both/and situation. Does that make more sense?

              Thus, in the examples in your post, only the simple subjects are underlined. Because there are two or more simple subjects in each sentence, we know the sentences have compound subjects. Does that make the Teacher's Guide clearer?

              Finally, for sentence 3 of Practice B, "stuck" is acting as an *adjective* in that sentence. It answers the question, "Which kitten?" (The *stuck* kitten.) The fancy name for this is a "participle," or verbal adjective. It is formed from a verb, but it is not used as a verb.

              GOT IT! Thanks a bunch!
              MG
              ***Using some 5A and 8A MP materials for 2020-2021***

              Comment

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