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  • DiannaKennedy
    replied
    Bumping this post up for new folks

    @leahbizz

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  • KF2000
    replied
    I am so glad it was helpful!

    AMDG,
    Sarah

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  • Naxi
    replied
    It is interesting timing that you should write this, Sarah. Just this week I was discussing with my best friend that my "default sin" is fear. I have realised that whenever other things fall apart it is because my control has slipped and I start to fear. For example, my son was making terribly silly mistakes in maths the other day, and could not seem to remember things that he has been doing for years. Instead of me thinking, "he is having a bad day" or "maybe he has forgotten and we need to go over that again", I got cranky at him. Later I realised that I was frightened that we would never finish this maths book, which would put us behind for the next one and so on until suddenly in my mind he was 40 and still couldn't find a job. I know it is ridiculous when I break it down like that, but in the heat of the moment I didn't realise what was going on. Since then I have been praying for courage each morning, and each night reflecting on the difference that courage has made.

    It is easy to fear when our own futures are so unpredictable, even in the short term. This is great advice and a great reminder for me, thank you.

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  • KF2000
    replied
    Naxi Hi there!!

    I agree: having everything canceled this spring was a blessing for me as well...not that we had a ton going on, but enough that the change was still really nice. That is, until spring fever set in and all of our motivation really started waning! We are plugging along to truly finish for the year, but we are all a bit more interested in anything BUT school at this point!

    So, your question is, "How do I manage?"

    I think, based on the context of your question, the best way to answer that is to work hard at not being afraid. There are so many good things we want for our children and our families. One of these is a good, solid education that will help them become their best selves and prepare them for a life centered on truth, goodness, and beauty. Another is for them to develop talents and skills that round them out as people - such as the sports in which your kids compete. Yes, you have a huge commitment there, but I am sure that you also have specific benefits you see them earning from it and thereby consider it an important part of their childhood years. (If it's not, then by all means, cut it from your schedule and don't look back.) Another thing we want is to be able to be a fully-functioning mom who is able to keep up with the demands of our families in the best way possible. There are others, but these are good ones to focus on for now, and seem to be most applicable to your question.

    The most difficult thing for us to take is when something interferes with our hopes and plans for these things. Whether it is a problem that develops over time or a sudden change, the most basic response to such changes is fear. We begin to ask the very same question you did: "Will I still be able to do what I had hoped? And if so, how?" The uncertainty, the sense of not being up to the task, and the nervousness that creates can be overwhelming.

    That's why fighting this fear is so important, at least for me, It's part of taking stock of each day. I never have been one to look too far down the road; I do have the organizational preference to have plans in mind, but on a day-to-day basis, I prefer to take things one day at a time and do the best with it that I can. Sometimes, fighting the fear is a one-time commitment as I am getting started in the day, and things move along smoothly. I end the day so grateful for the grace to have done well. Other days, when things are not going so well, fighting the fear seems like an ever-present task, and is just as exhausting as anything else. But when I look back, over the weeks and weeks of pushing on, having ups and downs, I can still see progress - and it's amazing given what I myself am capable of. It strikes me so strongly that being able to do more than we think we can is only by the grace of God, and is therefore what I ask for the most each day. Because no matter what I can manage each day, we always seem to have what we need.

    But keep in mind...this is not just a matter of will. If you have some sort of condition, it is imperative that you get the help you need. Don't soldier on without taking your health seriously and making sure you are addressing the problems in a proactive way. Food, rest, exercise, avoiding stress, and seeking the proper medical help all play into this, so don't neglect any of those. But those are external things imposed on us. The actual job of "managing" is much more internal, much more emotional, in my mind. And for me, that solution is having a strong spirit, rooted in prayer, and aided by whatever feeds that "fighting" spirit that I need to keep going.

    HTHs!
    AMDG,
    Sarah

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  • bean
    replied
    Originally posted by Naxi View Post
    Hi Ladies,

    I have just found this thread (actually with a Google search! I was glad I found one here.)

    There is lots of interesting information that I will read over time, and some great meal ideas. My biggest concern, though, is whether or not classical education is sustainable for our family.

    All three of my kids have SLDs, SNs or both, so I am required to be hands on with all of them all day. On top of that both my boys are competing at State and National level in sport so we are travelling roughly two weekends a month. Or we were before Coronavirus.

    I feel awful saying it, but lockdowns have been so wonderful for us. With all competition and training stopped, as well homeschool gatherings AND my DH working from home (he was commuting 1.5 hours each way), I have had so much more energy. We have achieved so much more school (we slowed down at first, but my kids got cantankerous, so we started up again.) We are also just enjoying so much more time hanging out.

    I am worried, though, that we will be unable to keep up with MP as the world opens up again and I go back to being regularly unwell, up to a few days per week.

    How DO you manage it?

    Natalie
    I cook double every time I cook. I still cook once a day. We don't eat anything I haven't cooked (other than rotisserie chicken). I'm still strictly AIP- although I added in a few AIP carbs... and started to lose a weight and cleared up most of my joint pain.

    I've always used MP as a "do the next thing" curriculum. Although some people really thrive with the guides, we've always just worked directly from the materials for the most part. This way we are never ahead or behind. We're just done when we are done. We've had school wrap up in May... and late July. Now we do something year round, so it doesn't matter as much.

    We also will probably not pick up some activities as life starts back up. My DH works with elderly, so it would be risky for us to do things like piano lessons in a tiny practice room with a teacher who has 8 students a day. Dd has taken lessons for 9? 10? years, so we're not sure if we can find an alternative.

    Leave a comment:


  • jen1134
    replied
    I’m still figuring it out...and a friend here has been a huge help in that! It sounds like this time has shown your family that some changes may be needed. A big shift for me was when I finally realized that I didn’t HAVE to be freezing cold/shaking every afternoon as my body tried to cope with overdoing it. There are days when pushing more is needed, but that shouldn’t be the norm.

    I also have kids who are struggling learners. Currently, I’m staggering their lessons. I teach my two Simply Classical kids on Monday, Wednesday, Friday (from bed if needed). The older one is able to do some assignments independently on T/TH (math and reading). My younger one is supposed to do XtraMath and listen to a classic audiobook on T/TH. I teach my NT kids on Tuesdays and Thursdays, highlight their assignments for the next two or three days, and they do those assignments independently.

    BUT this is the ideal. Between my health and one of my kids’ emotional sensitivity, we often miss a day or two each week, or I only get to one out of my two people for the day. I just have to look at what we DID do and let it be enough.

    Also, to make the above possible, we’ve cut back to essentials. Latin, Math, and Literature for my NT, Spelling, Math, and Literature for my older SC student, and Phonics/Reading with math fact practice for my younger SC. I’ve had to cut SC-C for the time being for my NT youngest. My high schoolers are independent with online/streaming classes. I was supposed to be leading literature this year, but since that isn’t happening we’ve modified it so that they follow the assignments through the whole book, then I’ll give them the Teacher Manual (without the tests) and they’ll go back through, catching things that were missed/deepening their understanding. Then they’ll take the final for the book.

    Classical Education is completely doable for you and I and so many others — it just means we have to focus on the core of the feast, not all the trimmings. But that core is still rich and beautiful and opens the door for our children to take it further in their free time. I’m attaching a picture of what that can look like This was entirely their idea and doing.


    Click image for larger version

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  • Naxi
    replied
    Hi Ladies,

    I have just found this thread (actually with a Google search! I was glad I found one here.)

    There is lots of interesting information that I will read over time, and some great meal ideas. My biggest concern, though, is whether or not classical education is sustainable for our family.

    All three of my kids have SLDs, SNs or both, so I am required to be hands on with all of them all day. On top of that both my boys are competing at State and National level in sport so we are travelling roughly two weekends a month. Or we were before Coronavirus.

    I feel awful saying it, but lockdowns have been so wonderful for us. With all competition and training stopped, as well homeschool gatherings AND my DH working from home (he was commuting 1.5 hours each way), I have had so much more energy. We have achieved so much more school (we slowed down at first, but my kids got cantankerous, so we started up again.) We are also just enjoying so much more time hanging out.

    I am worried, though, that we will be unable to keep up with MP as the world opens up again and I go back to being regularly unwell, up to a few days per week.

    How DO you manage it?

    Natalie

    Leave a comment:


  • KF2000
    replied
    Hey Jen!
    Food, stress, overexertion, sunlight, and sleep. Those are usually the strongest culprits of creating a problem for folks. Is there a pattern to your week in any of those areas that would lend itself to such a crash?

    One thing I do is that I keep a note on my phone where each morning or evening I make a quick note of issues and progress...helps me keep track more accurately rather than trying to remember, especially when it's time to have a check-up. Maybe there is a pattern going on of something you are not realizing that is zapping you by Thursday. For example, I know if I have a GF pizza for Saturday date night, I will not feel the effects until Monday. It's pretty predictable. You've probably racked your brain already, and that's why you're asking the question though!

    I will say both my brain and my desire to do school take a hit by Thursday but that's not medically-based!

    AMDG,
    Sarah

    Leave a comment:


  • jen1134
    replied
    Does anyone else experience a weekly "tank day?"

    The last few months I've found myself hesitant to schedule various to-do's on Thursdays because I'm usually starting downhill by that part of the week. Bloodwork came back clear of signs of autoimmune conditions and thyroid but I'm about to be tested for hormonal imbalance, including another version of thyroid testing (we're 99% sure hormones are the problem, we just have to figure out which one(s) are out of whack).

    If you have weekly days like this, have you found a way to stave them off? I suppose the consistency of it is helpful [insert Mary's weary laugh]; but it's really discouraging to try finishing the week well when you're tired and irritable and gradually getting worse.

    Leave a comment:


  • bean
    replied
    Originally posted by DiannaKennedy View Post

    Can we expand on this a bit more ----- and you can PM me if you would prefer.

    When I told my husband my news, he looked at me as if I had 3 heads. "But you don't have Hashimotos. Your thyroid is working fine." Apparently, he has missed my 20 lb weight gain in the past year.

    He's slowly coming around to being more supportive, but will bring home crackers and pasta for the children. (while bringing home gluten free crackers for me, so that helps) I've already told him that I want to SLOWLY pull our kids along as well. Partially because it would be easier for me to simply not have it in the house, and also because I have a daughter with asthma who would likely benefit as well.

    I'd love to hear more about how he came on board.
    My hubby has come around and is eating 100% GF now too- it only took him 12 years, lol. He was slow coming around (maybe 4 years?) to a 100% gf house, but has always been supportive of the diet since dd is celiac.

    For me for meal planning, I cook once a day, and only plan one cooked meal a day. I don't eat breakfast, so that's always the eggs, costco sausages, frozen fruit, gf oatmeal, already cooked rice, or gf waffles they fix themselves. While dd is practicing piano I'll throw long cooking things in the oven for the evening meal, set up the pressure cooker (I don't have an instant pot brand b/c I wanted a stainless steel pot), chop salad, etc. Monday mornings I'll prep extra veggies either in the pressure cooker (things like long cooking greens) or salad veggies if I've had time to shop over the weekend.

    At lunch it's "buffet". As I'm doing those dishes (dd cleans it up), I'll start the pressure cooker/ oven, etc. I write a note about any finishing for dinner (usually something like boiling gf pasta), and go to work. Dd or Dh do dishes for dinner. I eat when I get home and put the clean dishes away.

    Leave a comment:


  • DiannaKennedy
    replied
    Originally posted by Fireweed Prep View Post

    Sure. Honestly, it's because a) I refuse to cook more than one dinner so every dinner is GF. My rule is that if I can't eat it, I won't make it. So I do buy the kids GF bread and crackers, even though I can't even eat those! It helps (?) that my kids have significant gut issues. We've done all sorts of diagnostic testing and have ruled out Crohn's and Celiacs but they still get physically and emotionally unwell if they eat dairy and gluten (and my older daughter, soy, corn, and peanuts). It sucks for them, and my husband knows that, so he's fine only eating what they can eat in front of them. The general rule of thumb is that if the kids can't eat it, it doesn't even come in the house. I am also sensitive enough to gluten that I can't have it contaminating knives and cutting boards and such.

    I've talked with lots of herbalists and NDs and nutritionists too, and always share that with him. Neither he nor I think that everyone is intolerant to gluten, by any means. But we know that for all of us, it makes a difference. My husband has atopic dermatitis on his fingers that is terrible, and gets worse when he eats gluten. Once he connected that, and saw how it affected the kids, it's been easier for him to stay away from it.

    I believe that I prayed about it, too, honestly, because it was causing tension in our marriage. It has caused issues in our parenting...for a long time he thought I was a hypochondriac about the kids' food issues, but after have a pediatric GI doctor tell us "Your daughter needs to stop eating these things or the chronic inflammation WILL give her Crohns" and then seeing the labwork on my other daughter that truly documented her body's fight with the allergens when she had to eat all that stuff again for her diagnostics...it helped a lot that I found doctors who believe that food makes a huge difference. Those can be hard to find. I haven't found one for me yet!
    Thank you for responding so quickly. <3

    I agree with you ---- I'm not making multiple meals. It's one of the reasons I stopped eating keto, because it was stressing me out. Tonight, I made dinner (tacos) -- made myself a bowl, and assigned him to feed the children. Divide and conquer.

    My husband also has thyroid issues, and in my research, it's likely Hashimoto's. But, I think he will have to 'see' that for himself. Going off gluten would benefit him, but I don't think he wants to feel restricted.

    Prayers for you, to find a good doctor for you. We were blessed that we have one in our corner.

    Leave a comment:


  • howiecram
    replied
    Originally posted by DiannaKennedy View Post

    Sending you hugs! It hasn't been too long since my diagnosis ---- about 3 weeks, I think?

    Thank you for reminding me that this is a slow process. The first week gluten free, I thought I was going to starve to death. That has settled down, thankfully. I've had a couple of really bad fatigue days, and I'm working on figuring out what set me over the edge there. If I have insomnia, the next day is usually brutal. With homeschooling, it's easier to shift and adjust to that. I've also learned that I don't tolerate being out in heat very well, unless I'm really well hydrated.

    I DO drink golden milk (tumeric latte) a few times a week as well. Love those!

    As far as food being ridiculously easy, I'm all for it. I'm having the same thing for breakfast every single day --- and you know what? It reduces decision fatigue for me, and makes it easy. Breakfast scramble --- eggs,cheese, sausage, spinach and grated carrots. Leftovers heat well, so one big batch can last a few days. Easy peasy. Your meal plans sound very much like mine.

    I ordered a box from Thrive Market this week, and HID IT IN MY CLOSET --- these are Mom only foods, and I don't want them disappearing. (wraps, oatmeal, etc)
    We are simple Simons here as well! I do eggs for breakfast most mornings (in my instant pot - love “poached eggs”). I stick them in the pot and put away dishes while I wait. It is about 10 min start to finish. I do sometimes do yogurt with a little granola (my hubby makes it! You can find gluten free oats). I put collagen in my coffee. In the winter I make two soups a week (instant pot) and that is lunch. I frequently put chicken or pork in instant pot and shred. It goes in wraps, on top of salads or rice (also made in a big batch at the beginning of the week). I do a smoothie with spinach for a “snack”. Dinner is taco Tuesday, Pasta Wednesday (there are gluten free options). A form of grilled meat Monday and Thursday, some veggie on the side.... pizza for everyone but me on Friday (I do tomato soup). Sat/Sun “leftovers”. Monday is AHG night 2x per month, so they get hot dogs...???????? I eat something in the fridge. Kids eat sunflower butter sandwiches (we have two severely allergic to peanuts), quesadillas, left over pasta, grilled cheese, cheese and crackers... so butter and apple and some veggies and fruit....so,, yes, pretty simple here!

    Leave a comment:


  • Fireweed Prep
    replied
    Originally posted by DiannaKennedy View Post

    Can we expand on this a bit more ----- and you can PM me if you would prefer.

    When I told my husband my news, he looked at me as if I had 3 heads. "But you don't have Hashimotos. Your thyroid is working fine." Apparently, he has missed my 20 lb weight gain in the past year.

    He's slowly coming around to being more supportive, but will bring home crackers and pasta for the children. (while bringing home gluten free crackers for me, so that helps) I've already told him that I want to SLOWLY pull our kids along as well. Partially because it would be easier for me to simply not have it in the house, and also because I have a daughter with asthma who would likely benefit as well.

    I'd love to hear more about how he came on board.
    Sure. Honestly, it's because a) I refuse to cook more than one dinner so every dinner is GF. My rule is that if I can't eat it, I won't make it. So I do buy the kids GF bread and crackers, even though I can't even eat those! It helps (?) that my kids have significant gut issues. We've done all sorts of diagnostic testing and have ruled out Crohn's and Celiacs but they still get physically and emotionally unwell if they eat dairy and gluten (and my older daughter, soy, corn, and peanuts). It sucks for them, and my husband knows that, so he's fine only eating what they can eat in front of them. The general rule of thumb is that if the kids can't eat it, it doesn't even come in the house. I am also sensitive enough to gluten that I can't have it contaminating knives and cutting boards and such.

    I've talked with lots of herbalists and NDs and nutritionists too, and always share that with him. Neither he nor I think that everyone is intolerant to gluten, by any means. But we know that for all of us, it makes a difference. My husband has atopic dermatitis on his fingers that is terrible, and gets worse when he eats gluten. Once he connected that, and saw how it affected the kids, it's been easier for him to stay away from it.

    I believe that I prayed about it, too, honestly, because it was causing tension in our marriage. It has caused issues in our parenting...for a long time he thought I was a hypochondriac about the kids' food issues, but after have a pediatric GI doctor tell us "Your daughter needs to stop eating these things or the chronic inflammation WILL give her Crohns" and then seeing the labwork on my other daughter that truly documented her body's fight with the allergens when she had to eat all that stuff again for her diagnostics...it helped a lot that I found doctors who believe that food makes a huge difference. Those can be hard to find. I haven't found one for me yet!

    Leave a comment:


  • DiannaKennedy
    replied
    Originally posted by 3Blessings View Post

    Dianna, I had no idea you were going through this! I also have a thyroid linked autoimmune disorder. Mine caused my thyroid to swing the other way so it had to be removed 12 years ago now and I'm entirely reliant on synthetic thyroid hormone. One thing to know about thyroid illness is that is takes so.much.time before you see any differences from changes you're making. Sometimes you can feel better quickly, but it is not uncommon for it to take 3-6 weeks for me to see any difference from a medication change or nutrition adjustment. It's just the way the hormone works. Also, if you are struggling with adrenal fatigue I highly suggest turmeric as a supplement. When I am in those seasons there is a turmeric based drink from THM, I will make 1 or 2 a day and it really helps even me out.

    The good thing to know about thyroid issues is that once you get them well controlled you will be able to feel shifts coming on sooner, and be able to react faster so that the impact to your life is lessened. I can almost always tell easily now when I am shifting into hypo mode and need to make adjustments to diet or medicine, and the same when when I swung hyper when I lost a bunch of weight recently.

    In addition to having a housekeeper come in while my husband is deployed, I have started ordering groceries online and that has made my life so much easier. You probably already do that, but I figured I would mention it. I even splurged for the membership to Shipt so I can get them delivered right to the door when I really need a break.

    With homeschooling though I have to admit that for the kids, I keep food ridiculously easy, to the point that I would almost be ashamed for others to find out what they're eating. Since my oldest 2 are old enough to know their way around the kitchen they are also responsible most of the time for getting food for their younger siblings. Breakfast is often eggs or granola bars and yogurt, lunch is a sandwich or leftovers, or more yogurt and fruit, and I only cook dinner about 2-3 nights a week because of schedules. The other nights they have leftovers (I always have enough for leftovers!), or make themselves sandwiches or grilled cheese, salad, or something else simple. My oldest daughter also loves to cook, and I can hand her a recipe most nights if she is free and she can make it (with me coaching from the sidelines) which is a huge game changer. I keep the house stocked with foods I know we can throw together without much fuss, and when I am feeling good I will take the time to prep the fruits and veggies so that they're easy grab and go snacks.
    Sending you hugs! It hasn't been too long since my diagnosis ---- about 3 weeks, I think?

    Thank you for reminding me that this is a slow process. The first week gluten free, I thought I was going to starve to death. That has settled down, thankfully. I've had a couple of really bad fatigue days, and I'm working on figuring out what set me over the edge there. If I have insomnia, the next day is usually brutal. With homeschooling, it's easier to shift and adjust to that. I've also learned that I don't tolerate being out in heat very well, unless I'm really well hydrated.

    I DO drink golden milk (tumeric latte) a few times a week as well. Love those!

    As far as food being ridiculously easy, I'm all for it. I'm having the same thing for breakfast every single day --- and you know what? It reduces decision fatigue for me, and makes it easy. Breakfast scramble --- eggs,cheese, sausage, spinach and grated carrots. Leftovers heat well, so one big batch can last a few days. Easy peasy. Your meal plans sound very much like mine.

    I ordered a box from Thrive Market this week, and HID IT IN MY CLOSET --- these are Mom only foods, and I don't want them disappearing. (wraps, oatmeal, etc)

    Leave a comment:


  • DiannaKennedy
    replied
    Originally posted by Fireweed Prep View Post

    My husband was very reluctant to change the kids' diet, and our family's diet, but now he eats mostly gluten free too, even when he's out of the house. I never thought I'd see that day, though it has taken six years to get to that point.
    Can we expand on this a bit more ----- and you can PM me if you would prefer.

    When I told my husband my news, he looked at me as if I had 3 heads. "But you don't have Hashimotos. Your thyroid is working fine." Apparently, he has missed my 20 lb weight gain in the past year.

    He's slowly coming around to being more supportive, but will bring home crackers and pasta for the children. (while bringing home gluten free crackers for me, so that helps) I've already told him that I want to SLOWLY pull our kids along as well. Partially because it would be easier for me to simply not have it in the house, and also because I have a daughter with asthma who would likely benefit as well.

    I'd love to hear more about how he came on board.

    Leave a comment:

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