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Moms Homeschooling with Adrenal Fatigue/CFS/Fibro, etc?

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    #16
    Bumping up this old post ..... because I'm joining your ranks. #sigh

    Went to a local functional medicine doctor a few weeks ago and had a big panel of labs drawn. Back today to discuss results and (among other things), I have markers for Hashimoto's.

    My doctor is recommending lots of nutrient support, eliminating gluten from my diet (see ya later, pasta), and STRESS MANAGEMENT. (to combat adrenal fatigue)

    I've spent the day ordering supplements, thanking God that I already have a housekeeper, and vacillating between being angry and crying. Which is sort of silly, I know. I haven't been handed a fatal diagnosis, but there's a part of me that says, "REALLY? Yet another thing to manage?"

    So, just looking for solidarity from you mommas, as I head off to bed and practice working on my stress management.
    Plans for 2020-21

    Year 10 of homeschooling with MP

    DD1 - 25 - Small Business owner with a STOREFRONT
    DD2 - 14 - 9th grade - HLS Cottage School/MPOA - equestrian
    DS3 - 12 - 5A Cottage School - soccer
    DS4 - 12 - 5A Cottage School -soccer
    DD5 - 8 - 3A, Cottage School -equestrian and Irish dance
    DS6 - 6 - MP K - home with Momma

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by DiannaKennedy View Post
      Bumping up this old post ..... because I'm joining your ranks. #sigh

      Went to a local functional medicine doctor a few weeks ago and had a big panel of labs drawn. Back today to discuss results and (among other things), I have markers for Hashimoto's.

      My doctor is recommending lots of nutrient support, eliminating gluten from my diet (see ya later, pasta), and STRESS MANAGEMENT. (to combat adrenal fatigue)

      I've spent the day ordering supplements, thanking God that I already have a housekeeper, and vacillating between being angry and crying. Which is sort of silly, I know. I haven't been handed a fatal diagnosis, but there's a part of me that says, "REALLY? Yet another thing to manage?"

      So, just looking for solidarity from you mommas, as I head off to bed and practice working on my stress management.
      Stress REDUCTION is key. Management just means that you’re shifting things around and that does add to the stress. The only way to heal this is to cut the stressors as much as possible. Be open to out of the box ideas. Talk with Brett about what can change. Everything has to be on the table because otherwise things will only get worse. It took us years to admit that but once we did, I began to improve drastically.

      You know I’ll be praying for you, but please don’t hesitate to PM here or on FB. <3
      Jennifer
      Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

      DS17: MP, MPOA, HSC
      DS16: MP, MPOA, HSC
      DS14: MP, MPOA
      DS12: Finishing SC 4 >> Moving on to mix of SC 5/6 & 7/8
      DD10: Finishing 3A >> Moving on to miix of 5M and SC7/8
      DD8: SC3
      DD6: MPK

      Comment


        #18
        Originally posted by DiannaKennedy View Post
        So, just looking for solidarity from you mommas, as I head off to bed and practice working on my stress management.
        I feel compelled to encourage you to incorporate Eucharistic adoration in somehow... random half-hour with just you and Jesus - no todo list. Just a chance to sit, cry, pray, read, whatever... maybe you already do this, but if not, perhaps you can fit this in somewhere somehow. Prayers for you in this new adventure!
        Amanda - Mama to three crazy boys (7A, 6M, 2), classics major

        "Non nisi te, Domine. Non nisi te" - St. Thomas Aquinas

        Comment


          #19
          Hey Girl!

          ugh. Sorry for this news...this is one thread I would like there to be fewer faces on, not more.

          I will add you to my prayer list over this. I don’t know a lot about HT but if I am remembering correctly, there’s good chances that diet and lifestyle can go a long way toward seeing an improvement.

          I love the idea of adding in adoration. Super good idea.

          I was going to say NAP. Seriously. Ok, so even if you can’t get your brain to shut off in the middle of the day call it a “rest,” but do something that causes you to physically shut off for as long as you can manage it (somewhere between an hour to two). Actual crawl under the covers and force yourself to relax your body. It seriously helps.

          AMDG,
          Sarah
          2020-2021
          16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
          DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
          DS, 17
          DD, 15
          DD, 13
          DD, 11
          DD, 9
          DD, 7
          +DS+
          DS, 2

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by howiecram View Post
            Re: Moms Homeschooling with Adrenal Fatigue/CFS/Fibro, etc?

            Right there with all of you ladies! I took a turn the moment I turned 40. :-( Early menopause runs in the family and I am fighting lots of changes in my body. We were pregnant at the beginning of the year and lost the baby at 10 weeks. The miscarriage did a number on my body and it took about 6 weeks to "get back" but I'm still not quite the same! The exhaustion is almost unbearable somedays! Honestly, though, sticking with a routine and following the MP plans makes for better days! (I'm also on progesterone which makes me sleepy and grumpy too) - basically the first 1o days I'm "great" - feel lots of energy, day 14 hits and I'm a wreck.....I have spent about 4 hours in bed, about every 4- 6 weeks, on a Sunday...
            I am sorry to hear this Dianna! You are definitely in my prayers! I have also heard gluten free is the way to go with any autoimmune disorder.


            This post is 3 years later and I feel infinitely better than I did 3 years ago. That miscarriage really did a number on my body! In Jan 2017 I started “trim healthy mama”. I lost 30 pounds, but it is the first way of eating that I have been able to keep up! It is not gluten free (but can be). I have not spent 4 hours in bed on a Sunday in a long time. 30 min a day, just “resting” definitely helps! I still have the energy surge and crash though. (coincides with my cycle - first 10 days more energetic, last 14 ugh! ! ????.


            p.s. I do not know how to quote 2 people at a time!
            Last edited by howiecram; 08-23-2019, 09:59 PM.
            Christine

            2020/2021)
            DD1 8/23/09 - MP4 (Math 5)
            DS2 9/1/11 - SC 5/6 2 year pace
            DD3 2/9/13 -SC2/Storytime Treasures/AAR

            Previous Years
            DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4, SC 5/6
            DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2/AAR/Storytime Treasures), Traditional Spelling 1
            DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK, AAR)

            Comment


              #21
              I have Hashi's in addition to my Celiac. Diet and stress management for sure! If you take a thyroid replacement, talk to your doc about the natural ones, like Armour (and don't take it at the same time as your vitamins). You may find this to be good news. This is very manageable, and once you've got your routine, your fatigue will be much less. PM me if I can be any help. ETA In a weird aside, Selenium supplements are often on the list for thyroid healing, and it is rarely gluten free. I just eat a couple of Brazil nuts every day.
              Last edited by bean; 08-24-2019, 05:54 AM.
              Bean. Long time MP user. I usually post before my coffee is finished. I apologize in advance for my typos and grammatical mishaps.

              DD 10th: Aerospace enthusiast. All AP & dual enrollment courses for 20-21.

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by DiannaKennedy View Post
                Bumping up this old post ..... because I'm joining your ranks. #sigh

                Went to a local functional medicine doctor a few weeks ago and had a big panel of labs drawn. Back today to discuss results and (among other things), I have markers for Hashimoto's.

                My doctor is recommending lots of nutrient support, eliminating gluten from my diet (see ya later, pasta), and STRESS MANAGEMENT. (to combat adrenal fatigue)

                I've spent the day ordering supplements, thanking God that I already have a housekeeper, and vacillating between being angry and crying. Which is sort of silly, I know. I haven't been handed a fatal diagnosis, but there's a part of me that says, "REALLY? Yet another thing to manage?"

                So, just looking for solidarity from you mommas, as I head off to bed and practice working on my stress management.
                Hi Diana,

                I'm sorry this has been added to your already full plate! You are in my morning prayers.

                But, I am glad you posted. I have been wanting to ask how others handle chronicle health issues. I have Hashimoto's as well (diagnosed 16 years ago) and I struggle with fatigue and feeling unwell. Although I have not gotten my diet into a good space, I have learned some things. I think autoimmune issues are a bit like MP core curriculum: while there is a sold base of information that is applicable to everyone, i.e. diet, stress management, medication, supplements, everyone needs to tweak for their own situation and find their particular food and stress triggers and which medications and supplements they need.

                jen1134, ClassicalFamily and others who have "gotten off" gluten and such, can you offer any pointers?

                Thanks again Diana for bumping this up! I will probably post again with more management questions.

                Monica

                Comment


                  #23
                  Hi Monica!

                  For me, "getting off gluten" was sort of easy in the sense that I was diagnosed with celiac. Dr. said "No gluten - ever again - in any amount." Makes it pretty clear, you know?

                  From that standpoint, we adjusted our entire lives starting immediately. I was super-sensitive, so that meant the whole house became gluten-free - no traces allowed. This meant new pots and pans (anything that has scratches can have residue of gluten trapped in it - thing baking pans especially), new cutting boards, new toaster, new jars of PB, Mayo, (anything that may have been contaminated) etc. It also meant watching labels for it everywhere (if it didn't say gluten free, we didn't get it), and it also meant severely limiting which restaurants I could patronize. But again, that depends on your sensitivity level. You may not have to go that extreme to see a benefit.

                  Two of my favorite sources for nutrition help on eating well with autoimmune issues are Danielle Walker, who does "Against All Grain," and Mark Sisson who wrote "The Primal Blueprint" and does the "Mark's Daily Apple" blog. Both of these have given me solid advice and a plan for eating that has been manageable and effective.

                  Diet and lifestyle can do a lot. Can't do it all, but it can do a lot. I have SLE (lupus), and while I see a connection of watching what I eat to how I feel, some of my worst flares occurred when I was doing everything "perfectly," so-to-speak.

                  Good luck to you, Monica and Dianna!

                  AMDG,
                  Sarah

                  2020-2021
                  16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
                  DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
                  DS, 17
                  DD, 15
                  DD, 13
                  DD, 11
                  DD, 9
                  DD, 7
                  +DS+
                  DS, 2

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by KF2000 View Post
                    Hi Monica!

                    For me, "getting off gluten" was sort of easy in the sense that I was diagnosed with celiac. Dr. said "No gluten - ever again - in any amount." Makes it pretty clear, you know?

                    From that standpoint, we adjusted our entire lives starting immediately. I was super-sensitive, so that meant the whole house became gluten-free - no traces allowed. This meant new pots and pans (anything that has scratches can have residue of gluten trapped in it - thing baking pans especially), new cutting boards, new toaster, new jars of PB, Mayo, (anything that may have been contaminated) etc. It also meant watching labels for it everywhere (if it didn't say gluten free, we didn't get it), and it also meant severely limiting which restaurants I could patronize. But again, that depends on your sensitivity level. You may not have to go that extreme to see a benefit.

                    Two of my favorite sources for nutrition help on eating well with autoimmune issues are Danielle Walker, who does "Against All Grain," and Mark Sisson who wrote "The Primal Blueprint" and does the "Mark's Daily Apple" blog. Both of these have given me solid advice and a plan for eating that has been manageable and effective.

                    Diet and lifestyle can do a lot. Can't do it all, but it can do a lot. I have SLE (lupus), and while I see a connection of watching what I eat to how I feel, some of my worst flares occurred when I was doing everything "perfectly," so-to-speak.

                    Good luck to you, Monica and Dianna!

                    AMDG,
                    Sarah
                    Thanks for sharing Sarah,

                    I don't have celiac, but I do have gluten-sensitivity. In the past when I stopped gluten I felt better almost right away, but it gets less effective every year and so I find it difficult to stay with it since I don't see an immediate payoff. This likely indicates I need to stay off gluten and be consistent with other measures as well. Having MP this past year has been so great because it guides me to the structure I need to manage other aspects of life.

                    Monica

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Absolutely. And I find that to be true in so many ways. When we add routine to things, we become more consistent on follow through. Weekly meals only happen because I go through the agonizing process of planning it out and making a grocery list (which I just finished for this morning - Hands down my least favorite activity of the week). But we don’t have the luxury of picking up dinner on the fly, so out of necessity we have a routine in place. Doesn’t make the follow through any easier though!

                      AMDG,
                      Sarah
                      2020-2021
                      16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
                      DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
                      DS, 17
                      DD, 15
                      DD, 13
                      DD, 11
                      DD, 9
                      DD, 7
                      +DS+
                      DS, 2

                      Comment


                        #26
                        A question that was on my mind a couple of months ago when I was at a low point of energy and trying to finish the school year is - What do others do when they hit those slumps of fatigue or flare ups? How do you stay consistent? If it takes you an extra hour or two to get moving, how do you round up your children and keep them on task, especially if they have their own struggles with independent work? If you need to lie down for a couple of hours after lunch, how do get all the school work covered?

                        For me, it has been so easy to just let go of whatever the plan is for the day, but that causes its own troubles. One thing I wonder about is getting the plan to a point where it operates of its own accord because it is simple, consistent, and orderly.

                        jen1134MBentley
                        I've been re-listening to Jenn's 2018 Sodalitas talk and I've been following Melissa's thread on time management and planners. Having looked at the comments on that thread about executive function skills, I feel I have a new appreciation for what Jenn is saying in that video. So this type of order lends itself to management of physiological conditions. I admire you mothers of larger families that are managing conditions that are more intense than mine and appreciate your sharing so much.

                        Monica

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by KikaMarie View Post
                          A question that was on my mind a couple of months ago when I was at a low point of energy and trying to finish the school year is - What do others do when they hit those slumps of fatigue or flare ups? How do you stay consistent? If it takes you an extra hour or two to get moving, how do you round up your children and keep them on task, especially if they have their own struggles with independent work? If you need to lie down for a couple of hours after lunch, how do get all the school work covered?

                          For me, it has been so easy to just let go of whatever the plan is for the day, but that causes its own troubles. One thing I wonder about is getting the plan to a point where it operates of its own accord because it is simple, consistent, and orderly.

                          jen1134MBentley
                          I've been re-listening to Jenn's 2018 Sodalitas talk and I've been following Melissa's thread on time management and planners. Having looked at the comments on that thread about executive function skills, I feel I have a new appreciation for what Jenn is saying in that video. So this type of order lends itself to management of physiological conditions. I admire you mothers of larger families that are managing conditions that are more intense than mine and appreciate your sharing so much.

                          Monica
                          Believe me, I’m the same way. It’s so much easier to call it for the day (even though it will stress me out more in the long run!).

                          Over time you learn to judge the difference between “If I don’t stop I’m going to be in trouble” and “This is going to be really tough.”

                          When it’s the latter, I tell myself what Pam Barnhill says: “Put your butt in the seat.”

                          When it’s the former, I do enough to keep the kids on their sense of routine and then we call it. If it’s REALLY bad, then it is what it is and I have to let it go. I’ve found that it helps to be open with the kids about what is going on. “Mom isn’t doing well” doesn’t give them the same sense of understanding/security as “The chemicals in my body are changing right now and it’s making my body hurt.”

                          ETA: for getting things “running of their own accord,” it really depends on the ages you have and the struggles they have. My 15, and 16 year olds can now run on their own but I still have to check in on my 16yo (EF) a few times a week to make sure he’s doing as well as he thinks he is (self-monitoring is definitely improving, but he still needs consistent oversight). With Latin being an online class, my 15yo could now teach himself all his subjects all year if he had to! My 13 and 9yo can follow highlighted independent work in their planners, and my 13yo can plan/write in notes about studying flash cards or working on a composition, but I definitely have to follow up with them. My 11 and 7yo still need me completely. This is where it’s really helpful to know your priorities. If nothing else gets done today, what must be done? For us it’s dishes, a load of laundry, Latin, and math. But I have to remind myself that that minimum is only for “need to stop or else” or “absolutely can’t function” days.
                          Last edited by jen1134; 08-24-2019, 10:30 AM.
                          Jennifer
                          Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

                          DS17: MP, MPOA, HSC
                          DS16: MP, MPOA, HSC
                          DS14: MP, MPOA
                          DS12: Finishing SC 4 >> Moving on to mix of SC 5/6 & 7/8
                          DD10: Finishing 3A >> Moving on to miix of 5M and SC7/8
                          DD8: SC3
                          DD6: MPK

                          Comment


                            #28
                            I should clarify: on those push-through days, I still try to find a time to rest. Otherwise I’ll end up at the “or else” stage way too often!
                            Jennifer
                            Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

                            DS17: MP, MPOA, HSC
                            DS16: MP, MPOA, HSC
                            DS14: MP, MPOA
                            DS12: Finishing SC 4 >> Moving on to mix of SC 5/6 & 7/8
                            DD10: Finishing 3A >> Moving on to miix of 5M and SC7/8
                            DD8: SC3
                            DD6: MPK

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by KikaMarie View Post

                              Hi Diana,

                              I'm sorry this has been added to your already full plate! You are in my morning prayers.

                              But, I am glad you posted. I have been wanting to ask how others handle chronicle health issues. I have Hashimoto's as well (diagnosed 16 years ago) and I struggle with fatigue and feeling unwell. Although I have not gotten my diet into a good space, I have learned some things. I think autoimmune issues are a bit like MP core curriculum: while there is a sold base of information that is applicable to everyone, i.e. diet, stress management, medication, supplements, everyone needs to tweak for their own situation and find their particular food and stress triggers and which medications and supplements they need.

                              jen1134, ClassicalFamily and others who have "gotten off" gluten and such, can you offer any pointers?

                              Thanks again Diana for bumping this up! I will probably post again with more management questions.

                              Monica
                              Hi, Diana and Monica!

                              Well, I had to go back and read what I wrote 3 years ago...interesting timing on this, as I am back to 100% gluten-free AND 100%-grain free AND 100% dairy free after a long time of alternating between being strict and letting things sneak back in for holidays, birthdays, etc. I was never 100% dairy-free until now, as I haven't had issues with grass-fed butter or hard/aged cheeses.

                              Long-story-short, I have been able to manage having some cheat meals and then drink bone broth, etc. to recover...the more I eat gluten, the less each reaction is to it...but inflammation has been building in my body which resulted in the worst seasonal allergies that I have had to deal with in a long time (in July), pneumonia, regularly pulling a muscle or injuring myself while working out...and now...I have carpal tunnel, radial tenosynovitis, and arthritis in my thumbs. (And all the hand stuff came about when I tried to step up my piano game and began practicing to play at church...) So, all of this was the wake-up call I needed to commit to a long-term solution AND test the foods that I am not sure about.

                              So, I immediately dropped grains, dairy, and most processed foods. In September, our family is going to do Whole30, which I think is going to work well for me right now because I'm going to pay for the Real Plans app which is integrated with InstaCart, which is crucial for me right now because grocery shopping is really hard on my hands, and doing a lot of typing on my phone is painful and flares the arthritis, so I need as much integration as possible. After the Whole 30, the rest of my family will bring certain foods back into their diet to test while I transition into a keto cycle. I do really well on when I am on a keto diet but don't try to stay in ketosis all the time, as I think I would need some serious support from a nutritionist to make sure I wasn't deplete of things, minerals especially. But keto-cycling, along with intermittent fasting, can have a sort of jump-start/restart effect for those dealing with auto-immune issues. I have definitely found that to be the case for me! My doctor is a big fan of using food/diet/lifestyle changes to treat if possible, so I am thankful to have his advice and support.

                              So, after 30 days of Whole30, and a keto cycle of 4-6 weeks after that, I will either go back to just straight Whole 30 or start testing foods with a food journal, depending on where my hands are in the healing process ( they need to have been better for a few weeks before I start testing food groups). I won't test gluten, because I have had enough reactions to it to know for sure, but I want to properly test the gluten-free grains. I don't seem to react to corn or rice, but I want to be sure, because many with auto-immune conditions have inflammatory responses to all grains. My doctor has encouraged me to make sure when I test things, I use organic, good quality products so that I can be sure that if I have a reaction, it is to the actual food, not the pesticide, additive, etc.

                              So all that to say, my advice at this time is this: don't be fooled by a low-flare period--if there are certain foods you know are a problem, just commit to not eating them forever, as the damage/inflammation can build slowly and then knock you off your feet! The other thing is this--it seems really hard to go 100% free of something that is ubiquitous in the American diet, but, in reality, it is far easier to say no every single time than to have to make a case-by-case decision. For instance: THIS cake is my favorite ever--totally worth the splurge and taking ibuprofen to mitigate the response--but grandmother's weird and too-sweet dessert? Well, now it just got personal. But if it is always and forever a no--it's not personal, it's not another decision using up my precious decision-making energy. It just is what it is, and I am moving on to other, more important matters.

                              And I agree with what others have said: it is important to develop the ability/wisdom to know when you need to stop ASAP and rest and when you need to push on through the day. Part of this is communicating with your spouse/family/close friends, as applicable, so that they can encourage you and support you in this and remind you not to feel guilty because your best for today isn't what it was yesterday.

                              And the more you cut the problem things, food or otherwise, out of your diet/schedule, the more you become aware of what works and doesn't work, including exercise styles, intensity, and duration; time of day to do certain tasks; organizational methods and time-management strategies; and on and on.

                              My hands can only handle short sessions of typing, so I'll leave it at that and resist the urge to keep editing/adding!






                              Michaela
                              Daughter: Age 11 MP 6A (MPOA for TFL, 6th grade math, and composition)
                              Son: Age 6 1st Grade MP Traditional Spelling, Literature, Math, and Handwriting
                              for 2019/2020 school year

                              Comment


                                #30
                                ClassicalFamily KF2000 So, in the absence of something like celiac or a diagnosed allergy/intolerance, my husband doesn’t buy into the “cut out all [insert food here]” approach. I’ve suspected for a long time that sugar is causing a lot of my hormonal issues but he doesn’t want me to cut out all of it (partly because it would be easy for my OCD to go overboard which would just lead to more stress). How would you guys recommend approaching it from a moderation perspective, since celiac or diabetes aren’t involved — or is that even possible when it’s affecting health though not labeled?
                                Jennifer
                                Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

                                DS17: MP, MPOA, HSC
                                DS16: MP, MPOA, HSC
                                DS14: MP, MPOA
                                DS12: Finishing SC 4 >> Moving on to mix of SC 5/6 & 7/8
                                DD10: Finishing 3A >> Moving on to miix of 5M and SC7/8
                                DD8: SC3
                                DD6: MPK

                                Comment

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