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    More Latin Questions

    Hi all!
    I have some more Latin questions. We're (still) nearing the end of First Form and need more practice.

    Do the summer review sessions have additional materials or do they only use the student workbook? I'm wondering if there are extra practice sheets or anything that have been created that could be purchased by those not in the class.

    I was searching to figure out how to identify which conjugation a verb is and found the conjugations listed as I, II, III, IIIio, and IV instead of I, II, III, IV, and V as they are in First Form. Can someone please explain this to me?

    (I apologize in advance if my questions are not very clear. There is a 4 year old singing "Shiver my timbers and shiver my soul" in a very loud voice about three feet from me. I'm having a hard time formulating a thought! )

    #2
    Re: More Latin Questions

    Originally posted by Lakeside View Post
    Hi all!
    I have some more Latin questions. We're (still) nearing the end of First Form and need more practice.

    Do the summer review sessions have additional materials or do they only use the student workbook? I'm wondering if there are extra practice sheets or anything that have been created that could be purchased by those not in the class.

    I was searching to figure out how to identify which conjugation a verb is and found the conjugations listed as I, II, III, IIIio, and IV instead of I, II, III, IV, and V as they are in First Form. Can someone please explain this to me?

    (I apologize in advance if my questions are not very clear. There is a 4 year old singing "Shiver my timbers and shiver my soul" in a very loud voice about three feet from me. I'm having a hard time formulating a thought! )
    I have forwarded your question about the Online Summer Review class to the Director of the Online Academy. He is on vacation today but will be back tomorrow and should respond then.

    There are technically four conjugations: 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th. The 3rd has a subgroup called "3rd io" that is often listed separately, giving a final list of "1st, 2nd, 3rd, 3rd io, 4th." There is no 5th Conjugation. There ARE 5 declensions, however, named "1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th." Is that what you're thinking of?

    Comment


      #3
      Re: More Latin Questions

      Lakeside,
      Can you share what exactly it is you need more practice with--vocab? grammar? translations? There are many sets on Quizlet (https://quizlet.com/subject/first-form/) you could use to drill, if you think that would help.
      Festina lentē,
      Jessica P

      '22-'23 • 13th year HSing • 11th year MP
      DS Hillsdale College freshman
      DD 11th • HLN & Latin online
      DD 8th • HLN & Home
      DS 5th • HLN & Home
      Me • Memoria College, MPOA Fourth Form for Adults

      Teaching Third Form Latin and co-directing @
      Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School, est. 2016

      Comment


        #4
        Re: More Latin Questions

        Originally posted by pickandgrin View Post
        Lakeside,
        Can you share what exactly it is you need more practice with--vocab? grammar? translations? There are many sets on Quizlet (https://quizlet.com/subject/first-form/) you could use to drill, if you think that would help.
        I'm unfamiliar with Quizlet, but I would say grammar and translation are where I'm seeing the need for some shoring up. He can do the recitation, so I know the information is there in his brain somewhere. I'm just not sure that the information is making the transition from the memorized forms in the recitation to the practical application of conjugating a verb or declining a noun. Does that make sense? That was why I made those forms for the nouns that I posted a while ago. Now I just made one for verbs so that I can give him some verbs to practice conjugating.

        Comment


          #5
          Re: More Latin Questions

          Originally posted by Michael View Post
          I have forwarded your question about the Online Summer Review class to the Director of the Online Academy. He is on vacation today but will be back tomorrow and should respond then.

          There are technically four conjugations: 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th. The 3rd has a subgroup called "3rd io" that is often listed separately, giving a final list of "1st, 2nd, 3rd, 3rd io, 4th." There is no 5th Conjugation. There ARE 5 declensions, however, named "1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th." Is that what you're thinking of?
          Thank you, Michael. When I was searching for how to determine which conjugation a verb belonged I found several sites that said there are technically five latin conjugations, but that they're called I, II, III, IIIio, and IV not I, II, III, IV, and V. When I read that I did not recall the IIIio conjugation, so I assumed that they were called I, II, III, IV, and V in FFL most likely confusing the number of declensions with the number of conjugations.

          Clearly I am a muddled mess here where Latin is concerned. As I've been trying to respond to your question I just clicked that First Form doesn't even introduce all of the different conjugations, correct?

          Here is where I am coming from. I have studied Spanish and French, so to me verb conjugations are determined by the infinitive endings. So, I guess I'm trying to use the pegs I have already created, if you know what I mean, in order to make sense of these Latin conjugations. To me the numbering of the declensions is confusing, so I was trying to figure out what made a first conjugation verb a first conjugation verb. In particular when I looked at 501 Latin verbs, I realized that I didn't have any way of quickly figuring that out.

          Comment


            #6
            Re: More Latin Questions

            Originally posted by Lakeside View Post

            Here is where I am coming from. I have studied Spanish and French, so to me verb conjugations are determined by the infinitive endings. So, I guess I'm trying to use the pegs I have already created, if you know what I mean, in order to make sense of these Latin conjugations. To me the numbering of the declensions is confusing, so I was trying to figure out what made a first conjugation verb a first conjugation verb. In particular when I looked at 501 Latin verbs, I realized that I didn't have any way of quickly figuring that out.
            What lesson are you on, btw?

            You are correct that the verb conjugations are going to be determined by the infinitive but in FF you're only going to get the first and second conjugations: -are (like amo, amare, amavi, amatus--the four principle parts), and -ēre (moneo, monēre, monui, monitus). You'll get the others and a few variants in Second Form.

            The numbering of declensions is less important than recognizing which set they belong to. You'll want to learn the numbers, obviously, but the focus is on the group and that group's endings. In first form, you aren't going to get any variants--only a model noun and endings for first through fifth declensions. If you've not already made a list of the model nouns of each declension, this is a very, very helpful chart to make. Also, you can add the gender rules out to the side. For example, here's a bit of what it'd look like:

            Model Noun, Nom/Gen S. endings, Gender Rule
            mensa- mensa -ae, 1 D F (first declension feminine) ***out to the side, write the three given exceptions: poeta, nauta, agricola
            servus- servus, -i, 2 D us M
            bellum- bellum, -i 2 D um N
            etc.

            The way the infinitive is going to tell you the verb conjugation, so the genitive singular ending is going to tell you the noun declension. Knowing the gender is imperative so that you can use the correct gender of adjectives. That's why there is the emphasis on writing and reciting the dictionary form.

            When you lay it all out this way (above), noting the very few exceptions we have in FF (domus & manus in 4th declension and dies in 5th), it simplifies it greatly. You are going from the Romance languages backward into Latin, whereas a child who's learned Latin will be delighted to find out he doesn't have to decline nouns in Spanish!!

            I also commend to you the gender triangle which is a great learning tool to visually organize and order the declensions, their gender options and the exceptions. It can be found in the teacher guide as well as at the end of the FF Grammar Questions in the appendix of the student workbook.

            Hope this helps!
            Last edited by pickandgrin; 04-16-2016, 06:21 PM.
            Festina lentē,
            Jessica P

            '22-'23 • 13th year HSing • 11th year MP
            DS Hillsdale College freshman
            DD 11th • HLN & Latin online
            DD 8th • HLN & Home
            DS 5th • HLN & Home
            Me • Memoria College, MPOA Fourth Form for Adults

            Teaching Third Form Latin and co-directing @
            Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School, est. 2016

            Comment


              #7
              Re: More Latin Questions

              Hello,

              Thank you for the questions. The summer review classes simply use the workbook and the instructors teach off of the unit reviews. Students typically work through a lesson a day (4-5 worksheets) and are able to accomplish a good review. There are only 4 conjugations, but 5 declensions. 3rd IO verbs are really considered part of the 3rd Conjugations, but look like 4th Conjugation verbs.

              Thank you!

              Scott Piland
              Director
              Memoria Press Online Academy
              [email protected]

              Originally posted by Lakeside View Post
              Hi all!
              I have some more Latin questions. We're (still) nearing the end of First Form and need more practice.

              Do the summer review sessions have additional materials or do they only use the student workbook? I'm wondering if there are extra practice sheets or anything that have been created that could be purchased by those not in the class.

              I was searching to figure out how to identify which conjugation a verb is and found the conjugations listed as I, II, III, IIIio, and IV instead of I, II, III, IV, and V as they are in First Form. Can someone please explain this to me?

              (I apologize in advance if my questions are not very clear. There is a 4 year old singing "Shiver my timbers and shiver my soul" in a very loud voice about three feet from me. I'm having a hard time formulating a thought! )

              Comment

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