Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OT: 8 Year Olds

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    OT: 8 Year Olds

    My oldest is nearly 8 -- St Patrick's Day. I keep hearing that 8 is a bit of a milestone and that emotionally, socially, physically 8 is kind of a precursor to the struggles to come in the later adolescent years (aka puberty). Is this hogwash? Or can someone elucidate? Further, can you recommend some tactics, plans or preparations if they are needed? This is our first time around with an almost-8-er.
    “If I should fall even a thousand times a day, a thousand times, with peaceful repentance, I will say immediately, Nunc Coepi, ‘Now, I begin.’.”

    ~Venerable Bruno Lanteri
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Wonder Boy 14 ... MP5 + R&S Math 6
    Joy Bubble 12 ... MP5 full core
    Cowboy 10 ... MP5 + R&S Math 4
    Sassafras 6 ... MP1
    All … SSPX Catechesis

    #2
    Re: OT: 8 Year Olds

    Anita,

    Just peeking in today since I am sending my 20 yo son off for the odyssey of international travel in just a few hours. College awaits!

    I have said for at least 14 years: 8 years old boys are THE MOTHER'S PAYBACK! I have had 3 of them. 8 year old boys are still lovey with mom and will snuggle up to her (a few of my boys would still sit on my lap). Yet, they are beginning to see what other's need. Every one of my 8 year old boys (three of them) has been anxious to comb my hair, massage my shoulders, or plot making me breakfast in bed on special occasions.

    Of course, I do know from many, many threads on this board that each individual child's personality comes into play. Of all my own kids, only my one single daughter is the kid to gray my hair with bad attitude, ha, ha. That said, I have observed that 8 yrs is the sweet spot in childhood: just about half way between still wanting and needing loving care, but able to take on true responsibilities in a way that younger kids cannot. I don't think it's coincidence that 8 yrs/3rd grade seems to be the true launching year for "grammar school".


    Jen
    DS, 28 yrs, graduated from MIT (Aerospace)

    DS, 26 yrs, graduated from SIU's School of Business, ENGAGED!

    DD, 23 yrs, graduated from The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC; 2nd grade teacher.

    DS, 13 yrs, 9th grade; attends a private classical school, 7th - 12th.

    All homeschooled for some/all of their K-12 education.

    Me: retired after 16 years of continuous homeschooling, now a high school chemistry teacher at a large Catholic high school

    Comment


      #3
      Re: OT: 8 Year Olds

      Hi Anita! I am not sure what common wisdom says about 8 year olds, but I can offer a couple of things. I think the transition I start seeing happens in that seven+ year, so that by 8 you are really seeing a different child than you had previously. And if you think historically, classical education really began for children at age 7, a consideration that comes into play with our faith as well (i.e. "the age of reason").

      I am currently on my fourth 8 year old, whose birthday was in late July, so she is "fully eight." She is a great "test case" for you. Up until this school year, she has always been cooperative, quiet, cheerful, self-motivated, and basically an all-around gem. Hitting 8, her personality is still generally intact, but there are rougher edges. She has been testing the waters of being lax in her self-discipline, getting sneaky at times, complaining more, that sort of thing. I still see the "gem" that has always been there, and I know what her lasting personality will be, but she is being a kid who is going through a "stage." That is what I think of year 8 as....a lot of testing of freedom to make choices in their own behavior.

      Prior to this, my kids have usually had a strong desire to be good, and feeling strong embarrassment if they need to be reprimanded (we do have our exceptions to that generality, of course!). Starting at 8, or so, there is a thicker skin that develops. They are more aware of their freedom to choose, and to possibly accept the consequences. This is the age my children usually start to ask what a punishment would be, to see if it might be "worth it" to go ahead and do the bad thing. This is what can be a shocker - that your previously delightful child has suddenly morphed into a quasi-defiant one.

      I do see peaks and valleys over the ensuing years. But on the whole, it does not completely suffocate the personality that was there to begin with. It merely means that the consistency that was so important when your toddlers were testing their limits is equally important as your children get older. I would add to that the need for calm, respectful authority, that is not swayed by their new ability to choose. I tell my kids often that we only give them the choices we think they can handle for now. As they show more responsibility with those choices, then they get more freedom. It does start now, at this age you are asking about, but it is a very slow process. You have plenty of time to figure it out. And amazingly, these pseudo-big kids still need a lot of affection, as they battle between their desire to be little and big at the same time! (Evening prayer is a great time to "cuddle" with a bigger child)

      Since I know you are Catholic, I will add that this is where the practice of regular Confession is so beautiful for setting regular "checks" on their developing use of freedom.

      Hths, from one mom to another!
      AMDG,
      Sarah
      Last edited by KF2000; 01-07-2016, 06:29 PM.
      2020-2021
      16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
      DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
      DS, 17
      DD, 15
      DD, 13
      DD, 11
      DD, 9
      DD, 7
      +DS+
      DS, 2

      Comment


        #4
        Re: OT: 8 Year Olds

        My 8-year-old boy has been very different from my experience with my dd when she was eight. Part of it is personality, part of it is gender, part of it is birth order and, in our case, part of it is Asperger's. *weary laugh*

        When my dd was eight, I could really see the transition from concrete to abstract thinking really taking place. It wasn't an overnight thing; rather, I could see the wheels beginning to turn. Much as Sarah described, my little pleaser still wanted very much to please me, but was also beginning to fight some inner demons whispering in her ear. This is when we began to see some questioning of authority, limit/boundary testing and the beginning of argument taking place. Compared with what I see from her more worldly peers, our dd was a cakewalk! However, for us in our insulated little world, it rocked the boat a bit.

        My ds will be nine next month, so I've had 11 months of his 8-year-old-ness so far. He is still struggling to grasp abstract ideas, is confounded by sayings and common phrases and is so very concrete. Asperger's likely plays into that. He is still my little (huge) snuggle bug and though the kid wears a size 4 shoe and is eating me out of house and home, he is still a sweet, goofy, eager-to-please little guy. Like his sister, we're starting to see his argumentative side coming out but unlike her, he has considerable difficulty putting himself in others' shoes or understanding the opposite side of an argument. He is stubborn, loud and just cannot fathom why people don't think and act exactly as he does. Again, it's hard to tease out how much of this is Aspie and how much is just plain old middle-child-boy. The one thing I see in him that I don't see as much in my daughter is a real, almost overdeveloped, sense of empathy. (She can shut down emotionally and become completely rational -sometimes to a fault- while he just can't.) While he can't understand why or how someone wouldn't agree with him on issues of Brussels sprouts or regular bathing, he cannot stand even the thought of someone suffering. He can be downright mean when dealing with others, as his world is made up of black-and-white rules. No exceptions. (We are working diligently on understanding when to apply the spirit vs. the letter of the law!) But when we're able to show him that his words are hurting another person or if he sees someone else engaging in hurtful behavior, he falls apart. For days (quite literally) he'll feel terribly. While he can be downright annoying in his perseverations (Star Wars, football. Legos, astronomy...) and his insistence that rules must be followed to the letter, we have to be so careful in how we correct him. We also have to keep a close eye on what he's reading and watching because he is so, so sensitive. (We got through the first 10 minutes of the Lego Movie before having to turn it off. He was upset for WEEKS because one character "grackled" his parents.)

        The short answer? I did notice a difference in my kids at this age. But I can't tell you how much was age and how much was "other stuff". I agree wholeheartedly with Sarah that just maintaining consistency is key. We don't negotiate with terrorists in the toddler years and we continue that mantra now that we have an adolescent (I never knew ELEVEN was adolescence, but according to my NP, it is). I'm not a jerk, mind you, but I still remain gentle-but-firm when dealing with the fun new behaviors that crop up with each age. By the time I'm an expert at this, I'll be a grandmother. *LOL* An overbearing, know-it-all granny who insists that her grandchildren would be perfect if only she were allowed to raise them.
        Mary

        DD15 - 9th core + CLRC Ancient Greek I & Latin IV + VideoText math
        DS12 - 7th core + Novare Earth Science + CLRC HS Latin I + VideoText math
        DD8 - SC level 2

        Comment


          #5
          Re: OT: 8 Year Olds

          Wise words, all. Thank you.

          What I am noticing is an increased need for freedom and privacy and more obstinacy (there could be MORE obstinacy with this child?! GADS!). This is paired with the beautiful helper, guider and protector he is. Truly he is a gentle and kind boy. I just see him longing a bit for something beyond us. And I remember how restless I was around this age -- although our home lives are worlds apart. I don't want to project anything into him or his needs, but I want to make sure he has more freedom, paired with more responsibility (which he loves) and boundaries that are expanded, yet more clearly marked (if that makes sense). I want him to be not "happy" but fulfilled.

          8 was the beginning of cognizance for me. I started to understand that I wasn't a baby anymore, but I also knew I was not yet a "big kid". It was hard. 9 was incredibly stressful as I looked around at my peers (who were basically clueless) and my parents (who were unconcerned with my needs) and felt very alone. That period began a lot of angst for me -- the first bout I had with a sort of lifelong depression; that my inner world and the outer world were more than a bit incompatible.

          My son has been tested for everything, yet never diagnosed with anything. Given his challenges, we take a lot of cues from ways to help kids on the Autism Spectrum, though he doesn't fit the classic Dx for Autism. He is more in the camp of apraxia/aphasia/MERLD, but he does have a few similarities with Autism. He would have likely been classified under the previous DSM as PDD-NOS, which is now lumped together with Asperger's under the Autism umbrella (don't get me started on THAT). But if you factor that PDD-NOS is an acronym for "pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified", that really doesn't tell you anything anyway. Our view has always been: He is who he is -- no labels. And we treat him, in large part, the way we would treat a typical child. He is expected to work hard, be polite, have table manners, know his prayers, not interrupt and play sports. He is also encouraged to be silly, use his imagination, have "quiet time" alone and pursue his own interests. He loves his siblings, sits attentively at Mass and loves adventure. He's a great kid. But I do see him pulling away a bit -- which is totally natural and expected. I would be worried if he were clingy and overly-dependent, honestly. But we do make sure he still gets snuggles, tons of reassurance and good one-on-one time with both me and my husband. So... I think things are okay, on the whole.

          I just wanted to know if there were any big land mines I might be better prepared to avoid. You can't ask this question "out in the world" as the advice and anecdotal "evidence" could be... Um... Scary. I figured (correctly) you all would be the best to ask

          To respond specifically to Sarah: he is not able to make first communion yet. His communication skills are still too immature. And his reasoning is not *quite* there yet. Maybe in another year he will be ready. Our pastor is scratching his head a little trying to figure out how we will get him prepared. We have a formal Catechesis program in our parish but our first attempt (a little over a year ago) was unsuccessful. The K Faith Formation teacher was (ahem) "incompatible" with special needs (even though I was siting in the classroom right beside my son and daughter and neither were being disruptive -- but that's another story for another day). I'm 99% sure that we will have to do home Catechesis. But it's still unclear what the guidelines are and how to determine his readiness. We go to a very small parish and my children are the only ones with special needs (which is awesome -- she said with complete sarcasm). I've been waiting for the CATHOLIC SUPPLEMENT TO COME OUT (scowls humorously at the moderator in charge of that) but that's not due until at least Spring. I don't know how much it can help our situation, either.

          Anyway -- thanks, y'all. My little guy is becoming my Big Guy. He'll be fine -- better than fine. But his Mama is just a little misty that her baby is growing up (so fast!). I want to make sure we're doing the best for him that we can.
          Last edited by Anita; 01-08-2016, 12:33 PM.
          “If I should fall even a thousand times a day, a thousand times, with peaceful repentance, I will say immediately, Nunc Coepi, ‘Now, I begin.’.”

          ~Venerable Bruno Lanteri
          ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
          Wonder Boy 14 ... MP5 + R&S Math 6
          Joy Bubble 12 ... MP5 full core
          Cowboy 10 ... MP5 + R&S Math 4
          Sassafras 6 ... MP1
          All … SSPX Catechesis

          Comment


            #6
            Re: OT: 8 Year Olds

            Hold on: Sarah?! YOU'RE in charge of the Catholic supplement?!
            http://forum.memoriapress.com/showth...lic+supplement

            Help me, woman! LOLOLOL! I had a chat last Summer with (Paul? Mike? Someone) about this and inferred that the person speaking to me was in charge of development. (Oops) So -- where do I start? This is a child who has a verbal comprehension and output of about a 3 or 4 year-old. But he is great at Math, phonics and loves sacred art. We are Latin Rite, so it is required that we use the Baltimore catechism for first holy communion prep and education. I also need something that meshes with daily MP curricula. Beyond that, I got nothin'. Do I just take the "First Holy Communion Catechism" and break it down into weeks?
            “If I should fall even a thousand times a day, a thousand times, with peaceful repentance, I will say immediately, Nunc Coepi, ‘Now, I begin.’.”

            ~Venerable Bruno Lanteri
            ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
            Wonder Boy 14 ... MP5 + R&S Math 6
            Joy Bubble 12 ... MP5 full core
            Cowboy 10 ... MP5 + R&S Math 4
            Sassafras 6 ... MP1
            All … SSPX Catechesis

            Comment


              #7
              Re: OT: 8 Year Olds

              Anita,

              *this post was written before I saw your additional post. See below for a follow up*

              I have been anxious for your response, and am glad your shared so much more of what you are seeing with your son. It does sound like you have a good handle already on the current "state of affairs," and that you just need to "keep on, keepin' on." The spectrum of personalities in our own home is the only one I worry about, and for that, we definitely have a child at an extreme end, who pushes us more so than the others. I am grateful for these challenges, as I believe they remind us that we don't love each other because we are perfect...it is so much more than that.

              As for Sacrement prep, I hope you can figure things out with your parish. Of all the places we have lived, there was only one where we were expected to participate in the parish program. It was the pastor's decision, not the bishop's. In our case, we had a child who was ready for the Sacraments at an age the pastor would not allow. (We did ask - no exceptions were given). As parents, we knew our daughter was already being disappointed on a daily basis to not get to receive. We discussed the situation with our former priest, who was a good family friend, and who is now a very holy bishop. His advice was this: parents are the ones responsible for discerning when their children are ready for the Sacraments, both early, and "late." Therefore, if we were certain our child was ready (or conversely, not ready) than it was our decision to make. He then offered to allow her to make her FHC when we were home for the holidays. It worked out beautifully, as having the date set made the next couple months of waiting a prayerful experience, and removed a year and a half of waiting for her.

              I am not advocating that you try to subvert the authority of your parish priest. I am offering our experience as an example of what we believed to be the working of the Holy Spirit to help our child receive the graces she needed. Each of our other children has been able to prepare independently as well, usually receiving at a daily Mass so as not to draw too much attention. We have been grateful for priests who agree to these arrangements. It may have helped that we have had the confidence to say what we wanted to do, rather than approach it as though we were "asking permission." I hope you will navigate your options well, and come up with a route that is right for your son.

              We even have several families in our community whose severely affected children are able to receive because they are able to identify the Sacrament as Jesus. I want to encourage you to keep in mind that it is a very basic amount of understanding that is truly necessary, and that you as parents are blessed with what you need to prepare your children well. I hope your priests will support you in that. And feel free to PM me with any specific questions.

              AMDG,
              Sarah
              2020-2021
              16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
              DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
              DS, 17
              DD, 15
              DD, 13
              DD, 11
              DD, 9
              DD, 7
              +DS+
              DS, 2

              Comment


                #8
                Re: OT: 8 Year Olds

                Anita,
                Ok, to answer your follow up post,,,

                Paul Schaeffer is the MP rep who has been in charge of putting together a Catholic supplement. I was working with him to help put that into a daily format for each grade. However, my personal situation changed over the last six months so that I did not feel I could give it the time and attention it needed to get done well, and SOON! So I know the project is continuing, but I cannot speak to the timeframe or the specifics anymore, as I have stepped back from planning that.

                I will therefore offer some suggestions, but consider them as coming from "just another mom", who happens to know a lot about catechesis. One thing to keep in mind is that reception of the Sacraments is something for which we should be prepared, but not for which we need to be perfect beforehand. Therefore, children's state of readiness must be child-specific. As I mentioned previously, we know of one family in particular whose son is primarily wheel-chair bound and nonverbal, but who was able to display recognition of the host as Jesus, for which he has been allowed to receive. The degree of his culpability would determine whether he needs Confession, which would be nearly impossible for this child, given his inability to communicate. This does not prevent him from receiving. So your son already has much going for him, doesn't he?

                Your thought of taking the FCC and breaking it up over weeks is good. Keep in mind his ability to prepare for Confession first. If your son is able to recognize his choices as right and wrong, and can experience contrition, I would assume he could be prepared. There is no special permission needed to go to Confession. He would just want to share with the priest that it is his first time when he does go. We usually practice a bit, to get the format "down," and then when ready, they join in with us when we go.

                We use a variety of great materials to help, which you can easily find from Catholic suppliers. The basics I expect for them is to know the Ten Commandments, to know the FCC, and to go through some various "prep" books so that we have spent time talking about it in the weeks leading up to it. Mostly the "books" give you an excuse to sit down and prepare in a focused way.

                But it should not have an expectation like "passing a test" to get to receive. We usually ask a priest after a daily Mass, or if he comes over for supper. We say, "Our child needs to be examined to be able to receive First Holy Communion." Then they sit, have a short conversation, and that is all. Sometimes there will be something that still needs more preparation (nerves can come into play) so we just try again a few weeks later. That is really all. Then we arrange with the priest for a day on which to have them receive, and plan to invite friends.

                Maybe that will give you some ideas. I know homeschoolers tend to handle it in a variety of ways, and this is what has worked for us. You can definitely make more or less of a "to do" based on your family, but we tend to be pretty simple folk, so this is good for us. I wish you well in discerning, and hope others will chime in with their experiences too. I am sure I will be blown away by what others do

                AMDG,
                Sarah
                2020-2021
                16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
                DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
                DS, 17
                DD, 15
                DD, 13
                DD, 11
                DD, 9
                DD, 7
                +DS+
                DS, 2

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: OT: 8 Year Olds

                  This is where I smile, as a mom. He knows the Eucharist is Jesus. He has wanted to receive since he was 5 years old. He goes with me to First Friday adoration and he can sit in the pew by himself and follow along (with the Latin Mass, no less!) if I have to take the older kids out of the church for discipline (during a week day, for example). I'm not totally sure, but I think our priest's view is that if he can't make confession, then he can't receive... I could be wrong. Again, we are LR so our parish is a bit more strict. I really need to sit down with Fr and flesh this all out. But my understanding is that if he is capable of reception then he is also capable of sin and would need to be able to have recourse to confession -- otherwise toddlers or anyone who recognizes the Real Presence would be allowed to receive. But I also know the deaf community and other special needs groups seem to be able to make their confession somehow... Or do they? There ARE protocols in place in the Church for these situations. I'm just foggy on what they are. AND WHY ARE THEY SO VAGUE? Walk me through that one.

                  I've seen the special needs communion prep stuff from Loyola Press but... That program is not for us. It's ... I can't explain it... It just doesn't fit our family style or our approach to the sacraments. Cartoons, flip books and their whole approach to receiving the Eucharist ... Nuh uh. What you mentioned (prep through prayer, books, practicing confession, getting a priest to "examine" him for readiness, and yes, receiving when he is ready with a little ceremony of friends) is exactly how I planned to do things. He is a test case for his younger siblings, who will also likely have to follow the same course.

                  So this is -- yet again -- where I am "alone" in the wilderness. (I should be used to this by now. But listen: if anyone tells you that special needs kids have a wealth of beautiful resources available to them, they are either fibbing or they know how to hide them under a bushel basket REALLY WELL.) I know I'm not really "alone" God and my MP/SC community are always there -- but it really does feel like pioneer work sometimes. WHY IS THE SPECIAL NEEDS COMMUNITY SO UNDERSERVED? Especially in this, of all areas. It makes me righteously ANGRY for my children and all the children like them. Didn't Jesus say, "Suffer the children to come unto Me and hinder them not -- for the Kingdom of God belongs to such as these?" This is exactly why I am so thankful for SC. The only piece missing is that we are Catholic, not Protestant. But maybe this is my job, right? To figure out some stuff for the next SC Catholic family who has the same dilemma. It's just frustrating sometimes (end rant).

                  Thank you, Sarah. You've given me a great shot in the arm today.
                  “If I should fall even a thousand times a day, a thousand times, with peaceful repentance, I will say immediately, Nunc Coepi, ‘Now, I begin.’.”

                  ~Venerable Bruno Lanteri
                  ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
                  Wonder Boy 14 ... MP5 + R&S Math 6
                  Joy Bubble 12 ... MP5 full core
                  Cowboy 10 ... MP5 + R&S Math 4
                  Sassafras 6 ... MP1
                  All … SSPX Catechesis

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: OT: 8 Year Olds

                    Yay . So glad I could help. Today is quiet - a fever has hit us, and my 4 year old is so super hot...glad I could be of use to you!

                    And yes - sounds like you are hitting on a "calling" of your own!

                    AMDG,
                    Sarah
                    2020-2021
                    16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
                    DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
                    DS, 17
                    DD, 15
                    DD, 13
                    DD, 11
                    DD, 9
                    DD, 7
                    +DS+
                    DS, 2

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: OT: 8 Year Olds

                      Originally posted by Anita View Post
                      This is where I smile, as a mom. He knows the Eucharist is Jesus. He has wanted to receive since he was 5 years old. He goes with me to First Friday adoration and he can sit in the pew by himself and follow along (with the Latin Mass, no less!) if I have to take the older kids out of the church for discipline (during a week day, for example). I'm not totally sure, but I think our priest's view is that if he can't make confession, then he can't receive... I could be wrong. Again, we are LR so our parish is a bit more strict. I really need to sit down with Fr and flesh this all out. But my understanding is that if he is capable of reception then he is also capable of sin and would need to be able to have recourse to confession -- otherwise toddlers or anyone who recognizes the Real Presence would be allowed to receive. But I also know the deaf community and other special needs groups seem to be able to make their confession somehow... Or do they? There ARE protocols in place in the Church for these situations. I'm just foggy on what they are. AND WHY ARE THEY SO VAGUE? Walk me through that one.

                      I've seen the special needs communion prep stuff from Loyola Press but... That program is not for us. It's ... I can't explain it... It just doesn't fit our family style or our approach to the sacraments. Cartoons, flip books and their whole approach to receiving the Eucharist ... Nuh uh. What you mentioned (prep through prayer, books, practicing confession, getting a priest to "examine" him for readiness, and yes, receiving when he is ready with a little ceremony of friends) is exactly how I planned to do things. He is a test case for his younger siblings, who will also likely have to follow the same course.

                      So this is -- yet again -- where I am "alone" in the wilderness. (I should be used to this by now. But listen: if anyone tells you that special needs kids have a wealth of beautiful resources available to them, they are either fibbing or they know how to hide them under a bushel basket REALLY WELL.) I know I'm not really "alone" God and my MP/SC community are always there -- but it really does feel like pioneer work sometimes. WHY IS THE SPECIAL NEEDS COMMUNITY SO UNDERSERVED? Especially in this, of all areas. It makes me righteously ANGRY for my children and all the children like them. Didn't Jesus say, "Suffer the children to come unto Me and hinder them not -- for the Kingdom of God belongs to such as these?" This is exactly why I am so thankful for SC. The only piece missing is that we are Catholic, not Protestant. But maybe this is my job, right? To figure out some stuff for the next SC Catholic family who has the same dilemma. It's just frustrating sometimes (end rant).

                      Thank you, Sarah. You've given me a great shot in the arm today.

                      Hi, Anita. This might be a good place to start:

                      Have you seen any of these resources? Just one example: Special Needs Adaptive Faith Instruction for Catholics

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: OT: 8 Year Olds

                        Originally posted by KF2000 View Post
                        So glad I could help. Today is quiet - a fever has hit us, and my 4 year old is so super hot...glad I could be of use to you!

                        And yes - sounds like you are hitting on a "calling" of your own!

                        AMDG,
                        Sarah
                        Aw, I'm sorry Hope it breaks. We had it last week. My girl was 103 for about 4 days. Just a bug, though.

                        And yes -- God usually has to make me mad enough to make change. It's how I met my husband, how I started homeschooling... Basically every big decision in my life has been driven by my hotbloodedness. God just laughs and laughs...

                        Guardian Angel: "Lord, I'm trying, but I just can't get this woman to get off her keister. She's not budging. Doesn't something need to be done about this? Isn't she the one You picked out to do this job? We are losing time. What do I do?"
                        The Holy Trinity: "Don't worry, Jimmy, this is simple. We'll just put a hundred irritating obstacles in the way to something she really wants. At about obstacle 99, she'll get really fired up, start yelling and stomping and then it will get done. Don't worry, Jimmy -- I designed her that way."
                        “If I should fall even a thousand times a day, a thousand times, with peaceful repentance, I will say immediately, Nunc Coepi, ‘Now, I begin.’.”

                        ~Venerable Bruno Lanteri
                        ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
                        Wonder Boy 14 ... MP5 + R&S Math 6
                        Joy Bubble 12 ... MP5 full core
                        Cowboy 10 ... MP5 + R&S Math 4
                        Sassafras 6 ... MP1
                        All … SSPX Catechesis

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: OT: 8 Year Olds

                          That is it! She is at 103.6!! Her little sister was luckier, only a day, and much lower.

                          Sending you a PM too...
                          AMDG,
                          Sarah
                          2020-2021
                          16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
                          DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
                          DS, 17
                          DD, 15
                          DD, 13
                          DD, 11
                          DD, 9
                          DD, 7
                          +DS+
                          DS, 2

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: OT: 8 Year Olds

                            Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
                            Hi, Anita. This might be a good place to start:

                            Have you seen any of these resources? Just one example: Special Needs Adaptive Faith Instruction for Catholics
                            Thanks Cheryl

                            The first link: yes! I have perused many of those in the past. I see a few new ones, though, that I will look into further. Very sweet of you. (My Lutheran friend who runs to help EVERYONE. You're a gem.) I shelved a lot of this info in the past because Winston was clearly not ready. As school started rolling along and we were (basically) excluded from CCD, it got put on the back burner. Now, I think, is the time to get it cooking again. I will report back with our game plan if you think it would be helpful to the SC crusade.

                            The second link is to the resource I mentioned that we looked at but are not fond of. It is not "classical" enough. I know that's snobbish (maybe?) but I think they could have done better. When you break down what is really included in the kit, it's ... Hmm... How do I relay this? It almost makes light of the Faith. Very cartoonish, very simplistic -- not "simple". When I think of First Holy Communion for my children, I think of incense, a beautiful keepsake catechism, a carved rosary and a spanking new white suit for the boys or a lovely white dress and veil for the girls as they receive on their knees at the altar rail. The Loyola kit is more like jeans and a tee shirt and reception in the hand -- both are licit! I'm not judging the Church's stance on that. She is far wiser than I! But our family is much more Vatican I than post-Vatican II. It's just the way we are wired.

                            But again, thank you. I don't expect you to know all the ins and outs of our situation. You were super-thoughtful to assist.
                            “If I should fall even a thousand times a day, a thousand times, with peaceful repentance, I will say immediately, Nunc Coepi, ‘Now, I begin.’.”

                            ~Venerable Bruno Lanteri
                            ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
                            Wonder Boy 14 ... MP5 + R&S Math 6
                            Joy Bubble 12 ... MP5 full core
                            Cowboy 10 ... MP5 + R&S Math 4
                            Sassafras 6 ... MP1
                            All … SSPX Catechesis

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Re: OT: 8 Year Olds

                              I wondered about that. Yes, I see that you mentioned the program now. Maybe some of the other links will be helpful. I understand the motivation to create your own!

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X