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    Cc fable----help!

    So my son s doing the full accelerated 4th grade MPProgram. Everything is going very nicely until we do CC Fable. That's where I actually have problems. I'm not a natural writer, therefore not a great writing instructor. That said, my son likes to write but of course needs help with outlining and paragraphs. When we started CC I was a bit flustered that we were expected to just write an outline without any instruction on how to do so. I tried to explain the best I could, but again, even I needed help. Thank goodness for the TM. Then we come to the paraphrase where he's expected to rewrite the whole fable, and that seems daunting and we haven't done that yet. And finally we come to the writing examples of the anemographia, and other hard to pronounce words. I feel a lot is assumed on the instructor...like I'm suppose to know how to teach this stuff. Anyway, it seems this might not be the right writing program, or help a mama out. This is the sore spot in our day. I've been looking at IEW level A DVDs to maybe switch to, but don't want to give up too soon. What am I missing? Practical suggestions to this non scholarly mama would be very helpful here. Thanks!
    Courtney
    Ds10 acc.5th
    Dd8 2nd
    Ds6 K
    Dd4
    Ds2
    Dd1
    #7coming July
    "saved by grace"

    #2
    Re: Cc fable----help!

    Court,
    I seriously, seriously, seriously do not want to you to give up yet! I do not know how many weeks in you are, but I want to tell you that after years of trying out different writing programs, I would not trade CC for anything that is out there....and that is not just because I love MP and their core curriculum. I seriously think this writing program is a gem, but it takes some digging to unearth its true beauty. I am not trying to embellish...there is more depth to the activities that your children do than meets the eye of the page in front of you. So I will try to walk you through it a bit from my experience, and hopefully, with time and patience, you will start to realize that CC is surprisingly rich and wonderful.

    First, a little background. We have tried several different approaches to teaching writing...from modern curriculum publishers like Sadlier's Writing Workshop, to traditional English texts like Rod and Staff, to Susan Wise Bauer's copybook/dictation/narration approach, to strict narration, to IEW. In each case, I tried to give each program at least two years to prove itself as far as helping me teach writing to my children better. There are other classical approaches to writing, but they were either not printed when I was searching, or I read the reviews and they were not what I wanted (such as the ones that combine grammar and composition together).

    In any of these cases, my children were able to "execute" what was asked of them fine. But never did I see any improvement in their ability to actually go to their other subjects and put together a paragraph or a couple of paragraphs of their own. To me, if their "writing program" was not translating to their being able to actually write better, than something was missing. I have also had the benefit of trying these programs with my oldest two at the same time...so I had differences in age available (they are two and a half years apart; more in maturity if you consider the oldest is a girl, and the second is a boy); I had the fact they were different genders; and they have very opposite personalities...one is very linear/engineering type, while the other is more creative and lovely. They were both struggling with the same issues...how to figure out what to say, even at these young ages.

    So that is the background. The difference I see with Classical Composition is that by setting a foundation of imitation, students are not asked to come up with something of their own to say. They practice, practice, practice with what others have written, which then helps them internalize how they themselves should write. I say internalize because much of the learning that is going on is subtle, and builds over time, through practice. My oldest daughter just put together her first essay outline in Religion this year, and it came easily to her. It would be easy to say, "Oh, she is finally old enough for all this instruction to have taken hold." But she has been in upper school courses for several years already, and the only difference we have had is that last year she did the first two levels of CC. I firmly believe that it is the practice of the outlining which helped her finally see how she should set up her own writing.

    But yes, you are right that there is not a lot of lengthy instruction in the TM to let you know that they are actually learning a lot by going through these steps. I think this is a really good thing, actually. When I first began using Fable, as I mentioned in a recent post, I felt much like you described Court - I felt like an alien dropped onto a new planet who was struggling to get my bearings. I do have a public university liberal arts degree with an emphasis on writing, but I have always still been clueless as to HOW TO TEACH IT. I did not feel as though I had any sort of advantage when I started. So I kept things very basic - no embellishment, no lengthy discussions or explanations....simply using what is there in the book. No overkill, no even "sort of kill"...just the bare bones. We simply did the activities.

    My biggest point I could make to you is: This is not an instruction heavy course. There is not a lot of explanation on purpose. Because your child will not learn to write by you explaining how to write. This is a course where your children learn to write by simply doing the activities listed. They will start out not doing them very well, but that is because it is new, and they have to learn how to do it. That is why they are so repetitive. Do not worry about that. Do not worry about whether you think you are teaching it well. It is really not that important for you to "teach" much at all. They learn this by doing the activities. If you trust that, and relieve yourself of the pressure, I think you have a much less stressful experience.

    But I also want to take a minute and give you some practical tips that I hope will help you feel more comfortable during these early weeks, because I remember what it was like for me, and hopefully these are things I would have liked to have known. So, I will post this, and give the practical advice in another post so this does not get super huge.

    AMDG,
    Sarah
    2020-2021
    16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
    DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
    DS, 16
    DD, 14
    DD, 12
    DD, 10
    DD, 8
    DD, 6
    +DS+
    DS, 2

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Cc fable----help!

      Crash Course in Classical Composition: Fable....what I do:

      Day 1 - starting the fable. In our first lesson, I explain that we are starting to learn to write by learning how other people have written. Fables are one of the shortest types of stories there are, so they are a really good way for us to see how stories are "set-up." Then we read the fable together, and talk about the vocabulary words listed in the TM. Then I explain that in all these stories that we will be learning, there will be three things that we can identify: Recognition, Reversal, and Suffering.

      There can be two kinds of Recognition. The first is easy. I "recognize" something in the story that I have had experience with, such as watching an ant running around on the ground looking for food, or seeing a butterfly flying in the breeze. The second type is that a character in the story realizes something during the story that he did not know before. An "aha" moment, if you will. So for the Ant and the Chrysalis, that would be when the Ant suddenly realizes the butterfly was what used to be in the chrysalis. Or in the Ant and the Grasshopper, when the grasshopper realizes that it should have been storing up food for the winter after all. The events of the story have led to something being "realized."

      Then we talk about Reversal. This is where someone high was brought low, or someone low was brought high, or both. Fables are excellent for this, and kids can usually pick up on them easily: proud being humbled; the humble being raised up. In the ant and the chrysalis, the lowly chrysalis is even physically raised....which is nice. Then you talk about Suffering, and whether either character or both suffered anything during the story. Let your children go with what they pick up on. They may catch it all, they may not. Sometimes my kids surprise me with what they realize. Other times this is very quick and we don't talk about it a ton. Then they have to close their book and tell me the story. Don't stress over this. It is their first crack at it, and however well they do, is however well they do.

      Day Two: Variations...Let me know if you want more specific help here, but these are pretty cut and dried. I do not stress about whether their new sentences are "better" than the given ones. The point of this exercise is to help your children realize that you can change the words in a sentence without changing the meaning of the sentence. You can gradually begin to walk them into trying to make their sentences "more interesting," but that does not need to be strongly emphasized. Just let them get used to the idea that there is no one, single right way to write something. Kids, especially perfectionists, can get hung up on trying to write something because they are afraid they will not say it right, or because they think there is a 'right answer' and they do not know it. Letting them monkey around with sentences helps them see that there are a lot of different ways to write the same thing. It is freeing for them just to realize that. It helps them not be paralyzed when it comes to trying to think of something to say.

      Day Three: Outline. Oh man, this is the one step that seems to be a topic of discussion a lot....but it is also my favorite, favorite step. My gripe about the other writing programs we used was that none of them ever helped my children make that progress into knowing how to write a simple paragraph well. This activity is the kicker for me. So, what I do first is to remind my kids that every story (because we are only focused on stories for the first two years) has several main parts. The number of main parts can vary, but they usually have some sort of beginning situation, some sort of conflict or problem, and then some sort of resolution to that problem. So we begin by figuring out "what is the situation at the beginning of the story?" This helps them see where to begin their outline, by identifying main point number one. Then I say, "okay, so then what is the main thing that these characters go through?" to try and help them identify the other main points...there are usually one or two middle main points. "And where do things really change, or begin to end up?" to try and identify the last main point.

      Once we have done the main points, the I start back with the first main point, and I have them go back through the story, to see what goes with the first main point. Having the 'form' of the outline to me is a real help here, even if it is only in your TM, because I personally would never know how to have them break these things up. I learned how to outline better by doing this with my kids. I learned how to identify sub points and details by doing this with my kids. So just walk through it, using the TM, and guiding them...."What does the story say next? Does that go with this same idea? Then it needs to go right with it as a detail. Is this a new idea? A new comment? Then it needs a new letter." It does take practice, and for me, having the form written out for my kids was a real help. So even if your student book does not have the form, I would give them the form (all the letters, and the numbers, so they know where to put things).

      Why is this such a good activity? Identifying the major points (the roman numerals), and the sub details (the capital letters,) and the details (the numbers) helps children see that not every sentence in a story is as important as the others. They begin to consider that there are "big points" and there are "little points." And then there are "details." Later on, when they go to the activity where they have to strip the story of all of its details, these concepts are reinforced and strengthened. They can see better what is necessary for a story, and what is there to make the story more interesting. There will also be an activity where they have to start at the end, and tell the story backward. This activity is easier if you can tell them to take their main points and put them in the reverse order. So there is a lot that they learn just by identifying these things. And kids get it...it takes time at first, but they do get used to it. I just did my first lesson with my 4A student, who is ten, and she picked up on it right away. But when I did this the first time with my son when he was 10, he and I had to go through several lessons before we felt like we had "gotten the hang of it" because it was new to him, *and to me.*

      The other thing I think happens, because I have seen this happen with my kids already, is that by the repetitive lessons of working on the outlines, they begin to see that writing is actually very structured. They begin to see that in order to write themselves, they need to have a main point, a couple of supporting points, and then details to make it interesting. It takes so much of the guesswork out of figuring out what makes a good paragraph. It makes the process seem simple, which it really is. You don't need to memorize that you should have "this type of sentence, and this type of sentence, and this type of sentence," in each of your paragraphs. To me, this has been the simplest, most direct means of their learning how to structure their writing...and it is merely just walking them through the outline, step by step. I still need the "form" from the teacher's manual to help me do this with them, but we do it carefully because it is more valuable than it seems at first glance. Not a lot of teaching, just the simple act of identifying what each part is. Whether you state each part in three words, or in a phrase, I don't think really matters. I think the more valuable lesson is identifying the structure.

      Day Four: Have them narrate the story from their outline...which should be pretty self-explanatory. Again, I do not stress over it, or evaluate it. I simply want them to have the experience of doing it. Over time, they get better at it.

      Okay....next four days in yet another post...
      AMDG,
      Sarah
      2020-2021
      16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
      DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
      DS, 16
      DD, 14
      DD, 12
      DD, 10
      DD, 8
      DD, 6
      +DS+
      DS, 2

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Cc fable----help!

        Crash Course in Classical Composition: Fable....how I do it:

        Day Five: Paraphrase 1. Man, if there is anything more nerve wracking than being forced to be creative, it is being told to be creative by using a fancy Greek term. I felt so lost and hopeless my first couple of times using these Figures of Description. I was afraid that because I did not know them, I would never be able to help my kids learn them. I was afraid that my own lack of creative writing ability was going to prevent me from helping my kids be creative. After all, how could I explain these things, or give examples of them, when I did not have that creativity myself? Yet, my son was sitting right in front of me our first time through, expecting me to teach him, and my authority was at stake. So I faked it. I totally, completely, faked it. I rolled right on through explaining it as though I actually knew what I was talking about. I read the definition to him, I gave him the examples from the book, and I asked him to try one.....*crickets.* *blank stare.* *nadda.*

        Ugh. So I dug down deep, and tried myself to do it. I took a line from the story and added a note about "wind" (anemographia.) Then I asked him to try to add some "wind." He did. Not anything elaborate, just a mention of the wind. Okay, that one was done. Then I said, okay, describe the "tree." He could do that...so I said, okay, you just added "dendographia." Done. Then I said, okay, tell me about the ant, without calling him an ant. This took some practice, but we got the hang of it (ethopoeia....this has become one of my son's favorite things to do...calling people a phrase instead of a word...like, "the stocky, bearded quarterback from Green Bay," instead of Aaron Rogers...that sort of thing)

        These are really not a big deal. They just look that way because of the Greek terms. You do not need to set about memorizing them. They will become familiar to you as you use them, because they only learn a handful the first year, and the come around again and again. Just read them each time you see them, and do the work. Do not stress over whether it is "good" or not. Just have them execute. It is the practice that builds better ability, not stressing over making each one great. They are only assigned three at a time, so it is a very limited amount of needing to be creative. It builds this skill a tiny little bit at a time. After you come up with the figures of description, you have them write the story, making sure to include one of the sentences they varied (from a previous day), and the figures of description in it. Keeping the "creativity" portion short, helps them get to this retelling faster so they do not have too long of a lesson.


        Day Six: Paraphrase 2. These are fun. These are where they tell it backward, or strip it of all of its details, that sort of thing.

        Day Seven: Do more variations.

        Day Eight: Put together the elements they have done...using either one of their paraphrases, their variations, etc. I basically tell them to write the story their last time, using whatever work they have done, to make a final draft. I try to avoid using words like "best version" or anything that is comparative...my kids stress over writing, and having a sense of "this will be my best" creates mental blocks of anxiety and fear. So I just say, "this is your last time through this story, so put in whatever you like from your work on it." No stress. As long as they cover all the parts of the story (outline helps with this) and include something of their own creativity, then I am a happy camper. I check for grammar, punctuation, and spelling, and then give them a "Super job" and we move on.

        I hope this gives a quick run down of my approach to Fable. Once you get the hang of it for yourself, each time you need to learn something new, you just go through the same process, of feeling a bit awkward, but pushing through, and gaining confidence. Court, I hope it helps you, and anyone else who needs a pep talk, to stick with it, and learn it, so that it loses its intimidation factor. It really has become one of my favorite things to do with my kids, which is a real treat after many, many, many years of Composition being a source of tears for both student and mamma!!!!

        AMDG,
        Sarah
        2020-2021
        16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
        DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
        DS, 16
        DD, 14
        DD, 12
        DD, 10
        DD, 8
        DD, 6
        +DS+
        DS, 2

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Cc fable----help!

          Sarah,

          I did not ask the original question, but I will be doing fable next year and wanted to THANK YOU for taking so much time to type all that up. I just spent the last 15 minutes writing it all down and filing it away for next year!

          The generosity on these boards never ceases to amaze me!

          😃 Tracy
          Tracy
          My boys: JR, Riley, and Jack
          MP rising 6A, 5A, and MPK

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Cc fable----help!

            I am thankful too, Sarah!
            Nievs, blessed to have such thoughtful MP friends

            2020-2021 God bless us all
            DS13, 8th grade
            DS12, 7th grade
            DS9, 5th grade
            DS6, 1st grade

            “Prayer is the best weapon that we have.
            It is the key that opens the Heart of God." ~Padre Pio

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Cc fable----help!

              Sarah,
              I was about to write a response to the first response you sent and now I see there's a lot more! Thank you for your encouragement because I certainly need it! I do not want to have to buy a new curriculum and I certainly don't want to give up too soon. So thank you for taking the time to explain things to me!

              We are currently on week 4/5. I'm going to read your other responses and I'll get back with you.

              Courtney
              Courtney
              Ds10 acc.5th
              Dd8 2nd
              Ds6 K
              Dd4
              Ds2
              Dd1
              #7coming July
              "saved by grace"

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Cc fable----help!

                I agree completely with Sarah. There is no better way for a child to learn to write than through imitating great writing. This program is worth all the effort the child puts into it. It takes every impediment from the normal "creative" writing process found in most programs and lets the child learn the "how" of the very structured world of composition. (Not too mention you are combining this with the structure learning of English Grammar though Latin and EGR) The fables and stories are familiar or easily become familiar and the exercises in the Classical Composition programs allow the child to learn and practice all the mechanics without having to create the subject matter.

                Couple tips to add.

                First, when you being the variations exercises, you may see "word block" with some children. It would not be uncommon at first to model how to do this with the kids and even assist in the search for new words or phrases to replace the selected ones. You could make a list together and then let them choose the ones they want to use. I mean it's not always easy to replace "ant" at first or "apple"...but like Sarah mentioned the kids will often get frustrated bc the new words and sentences aren't really the "best" or even make sense to their minds. Well you know what, they aren't. The best way to phrase the sentence is the one that is given. So the new ones they create are merely different--and the result of thinking outside the box! "Apple" can become "round, red, juicy-fleshed fruit"---which after doing these exercises two times with every fable before long they do gain confidence in replacing words when they look at their outline and try to paraphrase. It gets easier--but often you are still needed to assist when the word or phrase is particularly quirky. And if you have a child who wants to use the Thesaurus--I think that's fine too--after effort has been given to try to generate their own.

                The more easily the child can paraphrase/retell the story only using their outline the easier the writing down of it will be to them. In the beginning I believe I actually wrote the first tries from dictation from my oldest and then he recopied. I did that bc he was intimidated and seemed unsure in himself--so when he could just concentrate on forming good sentences to dictate to me to retell the story and then read them written he recognized his ability to do it too. This was a good model for him to start.

                And like Sarah, we would note what figures of description we needed for each fable and we would try to keep it as simple as possible. Always point out that they can add this description anywhere in the story and in anyway they like, but often when you think about it, there seems more likely places for them to be put. Sometimes when it seemed difficult on a particular fable my student might brainstorm with my help some different ways to get that description in, and then often he would end up combining some of his choices to make his final description. As the year went on this became easier and in the next level, Narrative--this really became the part he loved. I think this is because this is the only area where the child really has to use his own creativity which can be as simple or as elaborate as they like!

                Going backwards and telling stories from another point of view is usually the hardest. Expect it. Help the child orally do it first. This is new for you both and assisting the child accomplish all the exercises in the first few Fables is going to really set the year right. It looks daunting but becomes familiar as each week passes.

                Use the DVDs if you have them. They are helpful to you both!

                One tip from Andrew Pudewa that helped me. View yourself as an editor to the child when he turns in his work to you. Without too much comment just make the corrections that need to be made--fixing awkward sentences, grammar and punctuation errors, etc and then merely give it back and let them recopy with the corrections. It doesn't need to be a beating! All writers need editors! My husband just wrote a letter of recommendation for a local high schooler to apply to a service academy, and he handed it to me to edit. My kids saw that and I did pointed out how we all benefit from help and editing from others! So lastly, be positive, patient, and don't expect perfection or some brilliant masterpiece!! It is going to look mostly like the original fable and that is what it is supposed to look like. Celebrate the accomplishment, good add-ins, and awesome handwriting! I loved it when at the end of our work, the student would proudly read his retelling to the family after dinner!! Bravo!

                Good Luck!
                Elizabeth
                Elizabeth
                Currently using 6A (DS 11), 4A (DD 9), 2 (DS 7), and Jr.K (DS almost 5)

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Cc fable----help!

                  Sarah,
                  You sure explained things very well and I'm feeling better for sure! So thank you!
                  You are corect in saying that the kids will pick up quickly what they need to learn. For recognition, reversal and suffering, we actually got the Hang of it and my son understands that part. We have also enjoyed doing the variations and rewriting the sentences.

                  The outline is where we got our first hang up and that is where I had to do some acting and used the TM to guide how I guided him in writing it. But I dare say after doing 3 fables now, he's starting to get the hang of writing the outlines. He's also showing a bit of enthusiasm. Thank you for explaining how you do the outlines by listing the main parts first then going back. I think we'll do that too.

                  Now for the paraphrasing. Thank you thank you thank you for doing some explaining! I felt like an idiot trying to understand what we were to do. So now with your explanation I'm looking back in the book at the examples and a light is turning on! Yeah! We were skipping this Part cause I wasn't sure what to do. Also, I didn't realize the term anemographia literally meant to describe the wind. I'm kinda laughing at my self now!

                  Do you have your kids rewrite the whole fable or just the paraphrase? And do you allow them to look at the fable or just what they recall? Like a narration. I see they say to go off the outline.
                  Wow, I'm feeling so much better.
                  About how long do you allow your kids to rewrite the fable? I'm thinking maybe 30 min? I don't want this to be a lingering task. So I would like to give a resonable amount of time for writing.

                  Again, thank you Sarah. I showed my husband your response to me and he was very impressed with how well you answered my questions.☺️
                  Courtney
                  Ds10 acc.5th
                  Dd8 2nd
                  Ds6 K
                  Dd4
                  Ds2
                  Dd1
                  #7coming July
                  "saved by grace"

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Cc fable----help!

                    Elizabeth,
                    Thank you so much for adding to this thread....I was nodding my head to everything you wrote, thinking, "Oh, what a good point!" We take the same approach of what you described, and you filled in a lot for me! Thanks!

                    Court,
                    I am so glad you are feeling better about Fable, and that the posts were helpful. To address your follow up questions:

                    The first day, they just tell it to me with their book closed. The other days of paraphrasing or narrating I will vary it as to how the overall day is going, how far into the year we are, if the child is a strong writer or not, etc. So for example, with my current 4A child, I am easing into the writing it down. (They never copy it, but they do write it from their outline) She is a slow writer, and easily frustrated. So I am doing as Elizabeth described and working up to writing it gradually. This first week, we just did it orally. Next lesson, I will write down her version for her, and have her use that later in the lesson to copy and add her figures of description and variations to then copy. So when I write it, I will skip lines so we can add things in easily. A few lessons down the road I will begin having her write her own narrations on day one, and work from that.

                    Now my 3rd grade student will not need to space it out like that. She already writes cursive easily, is already happily doing all her work in cursive, and writes her own thoughts down pretty well. So I will start off the year with her writing her narrations. I think in the course of the two weeks for each lesson, by the time they are doing full steam, they are writing it three different times. But we usually work up to that.

                    I do not expect them to be writing long. When they tell it to me, it is just a few minutes. So writing it should not be significantly longer. These are really short. I honestly do not watch a clock, but I cannot imagine they are actively writing for more than 15 minutes or so. A good way to get them used to this is to have them tell it to you on day one, then tell it to you on the paraphrase day, and then for one of the other days, have them actually write it. By then, they have told it twice, it is really familiar, and it should not be a struggle to write it down at that point, especially if they use their outline. They can be very very simple retellings. That is fine. They will get better at it the more they do it.

                    I hope that helps a bit more, and I am glad you brought up the questions, as they are the same sorts of things I struggled to understand too. Happy to help!

                    AMDG
                    Sarah
                    2020-2021
                    16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
                    DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
                    DS, 16
                    DD, 14
                    DD, 12
                    DD, 10
                    DD, 8
                    DD, 6
                    +DS+
                    DS, 2

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Cc fable----help!

                      I can't thank you enough for posting these detailed suggestions. We're using Fable next year and after reviewing the samples on the site, I wondered if we'd be able to handle it. I even considered subbing it out with another writing program, although I've been blown away with the results of just a couple of months of MP and sensed that their choices were consistently good ones.

                      I now feel more confident about progressing to Fable. I'll search the forum when the time comes and hopefully be able to pick up these pearls of wisdom! Thanks again.

                      Susan
                      DD 13 - MP 8

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Cc fable----help!

                        Those suggestions are helpful. I'll ease him into writing it. My son has very good recall and can restate the fable and he impresses me with his oral narration. But when I tell him to write it, it seems overwhelming to him.
                        We did wwe for 3 years so, I think he should be ready to write it out. His cursive penmanship is a hurdle. He's a bit sloppy and it takes twice as long for him to write in cursive. So, it'll take some time and work before he s writing / correcting/ writing the fables. I'm glad to know how you start. That helps me not feel too much pressure to do exactly as the book says. Thank you again Sarah!
                        Courtney
                        Ds10 acc.5th
                        Dd8 2nd
                        Ds6 K
                        Dd4
                        Ds2
                        Dd1
                        #7coming July
                        "saved by grace"

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: Cc fable----help!

                          Sure thing! We did WWE for three years too, (the oldest did three years, younger guy only did one) and yes, that was such a surprise to see after all that work that it did not translate into their being able to simply write something down. Even as I write this, I am in the kitchen with my oldest, and she's commenting: "We did sooooo many writing programs, Mom. That's why last year was so hard - I still didn't know how to write. Every one of them had a different way of doing it wrong. Now I finally understand it. All you have to do is put your information down in an outline and then write your paragraph from the outline. You really don't have to think about it so hard. You don't have to be so creative. You just follow the same steps every time and write it."

                          Ahhhh....out of the mouths of babes!
                          AMDG,
                          Sarah
                          2020-2021
                          16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
                          DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
                          DS, 16
                          DD, 14
                          DD, 12
                          DD, 10
                          DD, 8
                          DD, 6
                          +DS+
                          DS, 2

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: Cc fable----help!

                            Sarah, your daughter has said it very well! That sums it up nicely!

                            Elizabeth,
                            Thank you for your tips! I have read and will reread this thread. You all have been so helpful!

                            I am going to be writing down his dictation and then have him rewrite it like you suggested. Then I believe he won't be so overwhelmed when he does it all by himself.

                            With the variations I like how creativity is used within the boundaries of the fable. My son likes it when I say "what kind of sentence can you make?" He's enjoyed showing me his own take on the sentence and creativity with the words.

                            My concern has been his structure of writing as well. Like when to start a new paragraph. But from what I'm reading from you and Sarah is that by writing outlines they will learn how to seperate main points and ideas. It's becoming more clear to me.

                            Thank you for takng the time to help,me out. I feel I'm ready to start again with gusto!
                            Courtney
                            Ds10 acc.5th
                            Dd8 2nd
                            Ds6 K
                            Dd4
                            Ds2
                            Dd1
                            #7coming July
                            "saved by grace"

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                              #15
                              Re: Cc fable----help!

                              Sarah,
                              Reading this thread makes this engineer believe she could actually teach writing! Very helpful!
                              Wishing I could go back and teach them all again...
                              Blessings to you all,
                              Cindy in Indy
                              Cindy Davis
                              Science and Math teacher at Highlands Latin School - Indianapolis
                              ds-26 college graduate: independent young adult
                              ds-24 college graduate: 3rd year med school
                              dd-22 college graduate: working as a registered nurse

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