Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

High Frequency Words - Drilling

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    High Frequency Words - Drilling

    We are chugging along through StoryTime Treasures. During the reading times I have discovered that my daughter needs some extra drilling with some high frequency words and trickier words that don't follow the main phonics rules. I have turned to the following resources to help make some flashcards:

    - Classical Phonics
    - Online lists
    - Flashcards sold online

    I thought perhaps someone has already done this work and has a short list of high frequency words or trickier words that they have used with their child(ren). Classical Phonics has been a wonderful start. Whereas the online lists and flashcards you can buy have WAY TOO many words and words that I would want my daughter to decode versus memorize/learn by sight.

    Here's my list so far (going for bare minimum):

    he, she, we, be, me
    should, could, would
    who, what, where, when, how
    find, mind, kind
    for, of, an, as, (more like this?)

    *She's doing pretty well with the other Classical Phonics Sight Words.

    Can you help with others to make a short list? Funny that online lists can have anywhere from 100 to 1000! Gotta be too many!

    I apologize in advance as I'm sure this has been asked before. It's hard to search the forum for such a specific question.

    THANKS!
    Last edited by thenightbeforechristmas; 02-21-2015, 04:47 PM.

    #2
    The sight words listed on page 120 of Classical Phonics is probably all the words you need to teach by sight. Most words listed on the page break a phonetic rule though some are listed because they are so common. All the other words you will encounter can be broken down into syllables or "chunks" that have a phonetic principal to teach (ea, oy, igh etc...) for decoding purposes.

    Phonics lessons for reading should be simple and pertinent to what is about to be read. Lessons should be quick with immediate practice. So, taking difficult words from their reading for the day, going over how to decode those, practicing the decoding of other words that are similar, then reading those words in context is the best use of phonics for reading. No writing is usually needed for these phonics for reading lessons to be successful.

    Flash cards of common or sight words are great as a warm up to the reading lesson. Once a child has mastered those, they can be eliminated. Our teachers keep the challenging words they have gone over that are from the days reading in a prominent spot where they can be referenced if a child needs help. Too many flash cards can be an issue as most readers need to see words in context.

    Blessings,
    Michelle T

    Comment


      #3
      Syllables

      I have yet to teach about syllables. I usually just encourage her to slowly sound out each letter.

      How do I go about teaching about syllables? Or do I just model how to break up words?

      I am new to teaching reading (aside from FSR and other beginner programs) so knowing what to teach and how to teach it doesn't come naturally/easily.

      Thanks!

      Comment


        #4
        Ive never really drilled sight words (caveat, I havn't used FSR as it came out after I needed it). I teach any rule breaker/sight words needed for the next story we are reading in our phonics books. We practice them then read them in the story. They remember them much better using them in context rather than on random flash cards. And as far as drilling high frequency words- they will encounter those words, well, frequently. Why drill them when they will get frequent exposure to them in context? If you are using a thorough, well designed phonics program (like FSR) there is no need to do extra drill. It will all be covered in the program. If your child struggles with a particular word or two then you can focus some extra time on those words. Otherwise let them encounter the words in the stories. It will click.
        Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
        DD, 25, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
        DS, 23, BS '18 mechanical engineering
        DS, 21, chemistry major
        DS, 18, Physics major
        DD, 15, dyslexic, 10th grade customizednMP plus co-op
        DS, 12, super squirmy, possible dysgraphia, MP 7A
        DD, 6 , K- finally one who seems to like drawing and writing- first one since my oldest!

        Comment


          #5
          I agree with Momgineer above. When my children were learning to read, I would give them any sight words that couldn't be sounded out as they needed them (e.g. there, some, one, yes). They picked the words up quickly as they read them in context. I would teach we, she, he as a family group, not as "sight words" per se. Stay patient; it all comes together and then the child begins to delight in reading.
          Blessings,
          Cindy
          Cindy Davis
          Science and Math teacher at Highlands Latin School - Indianapolis
          ds-25 college graduate: independent young adult
          ds-24 college graduate: 2nd year med school
          dd-22 college senior: Nursing

          Comment


            #6
            Momgineer's advice can easily be used for how to teach syllables too...as any reading program will include a way of going over that. I have not seen it come up yet in FSR, but in the past, it seems to come very naturally....you just continue the sounding out process. I do not use the word "syllable" to do it (that comes along in their work eventually) I just encourage them to keep sounding out the word until they get it.

            AMDG,
            Sarah
            2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
            DD, 19, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
            DS, 16
            DD, 14
            DD, 12
            DD, 10
            DD, 8
            DD, 6
            +DS+
            DS, 2

            Comment


              #7
              FSR does not cover syllables. Once a child has mastered his letter sounds, the soft sounds for c and g, and the three sounds of y they are ready to just read, read, read. Syllabication is only one tool to aid the student in decoding larger words. But, it is not taught at the kindergarten level because most words we work with are one syllable. Once the soft sounds of c and g and the three sounds of y are taught, introducing syllables will be more important.

              The easiest way to teach this is by having the student place his hand under his chin and say a word. However many times his chin moves his hand is the number of syllables. Students usually pick this skill up pretty quickly. In my kindergarten class we say the name of each student and figure out how many syllables (FYI Mrs. Tefertiller usually has the most!) This of course is just for hearing the number of syllables. It will take several lessons to teach the rules of syllabication (ie divide a word between two consonants together etc.) which is a skill for first grade.

              A skill just as helpful is to recognize the phonetic "chunks".

              Hope this helps!
              Michelle T

              Comment


                #8
                First Grade

                We just started the soft sounds for c and g (Week 9 of 1st grade phonics) since we began her 1st grade year with FSR Book D and Primary Phonics Sets 5 & 6. I tried to look ahead (through the 20s) in the lesson guide and don't see when/how syllables and "phonetic chunks" are taught in 1st grade.

                Can you further explain how to teach the child to recognize phonetic chunks?

                How would you write a lesson on the board to teach syllables and phonetic chunks?

                Sorry if these questions seem simplistic and something I should know. I wish I knew this all better and felt better equipped to teach phonics and reading. If it came more easily, I could help her in the moment and know when and how to teach these things as she progresses in her reading.

                Thanks.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I'm wondering if the book Phonics A to Z might be a good resource for you? I've seen it mentioned in several threads as being a helpful behind the scenes discussion you can investigate to make you better in the moment with your student. MP sells it here, if you're interested: http://www.memoriapress.com/curriculum/educational-resources/phonics-z
                  HTH!
                  Festina lentē,
                  Jessica P

                  10th year HSing · 8th year MP
                  @ Home, virtual-HLN, & MPOA
                  10th, 8th, 5th, 2nd

                  Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

                  Comment


                    #10
                    It is not a problem at all. I will endeavor to explain it further. But I will encompass a reading lesson using week 9 reading for my example. It is the first part of Caps For Sale.

                    First I would complete the first lesson in Story Time Treasures that introduces new words and vocabulary. If the student already knows any of these that is great, if not read them to him and have him repeat then write them on the lines indicated.

                    Second I would review any pertinent common words. In this case: put, who, once, one, couldn't, thought: These I would put onto index cards and practice several times as flash cards before reading.

                    Third: I would put the following words on the board: carrying, carried, checked, walked, holding, himself,upset, called, fifty, cents, morning, nobody, hungry, money, nice, place, leaned

                    Explain that these are words that will be encountered in today's reading.

                    Now as we go quickly through each of these words I might say " The first two words are almost the same, they came from the same root word, carry" . "What do you think the first word is if the root word is 'carry'? " (Carrying) " What do you think the next word is if the root word is carry. Be careful here because carry ends in the letter y and that letter changes to an i before the ed was added. (Carried)

                    Now I might put carry, fifty, hungry and money together and talk about syllables. "Put your hand under your chin and say the word carry slowly. How many times did your chin move your hand?" (2) "Carry has two syllables." I would then repeat listening for syllables with the words fifty, hungry and money. After they have done this I would say, "In words that end in y and have two syllables the y says the long e sound." You might even write the words on the board broken down into syllables to help with decoding. Tell students each syllable will be sounded out alone : fif-ty, Hun-gry, mon-ey. Then have the students read the words carry, fifty. Hungry and money again.

                    For checked,walked, called and leaned I would write those together and ask if they see the smaller word or root word. Say "Listen as I read these words." Then ask " What sound do the letters ed make in this first word?" (T) Then I would repeat for the other words. I would then have the students read the words back to me.

                    I use the terminology root word. Usually just by using it in context students begin to understand the meaning. If you need to explain further or have questions, you can explain it further.

                    For the word nobody. Cover over the body part of the word and have them read no. Then erase the no leaving just the word body. Tell them the word is body. What sound does that y make at the end of the word body? (Long e) Do you remember why? (Because the word has two syllables.)

                    Nice, place and cents can be grouped together and used as a review of soft c. Maybe read other soft cwords on page 80 in Classical Phonics. Ask "Why doesn't the word caps have a soft c sound?" (because it isn't followed by an e, i or y)

                    For upset and himself I would ask students if they see two smaller words that make up the word upset. While it is written on the board I would cover over the last part of the word,set, with my hand while they read the first part of the word,up. Then cover over the first part of the word,up, while they read the last part of the word, set. Then I would have them read it altogether : upset. Follow the same procedure for any other compound words.

                    For morning and holding I would use my hand to cover over the -ing and have them read hold. If they don't know that, I would just tell them "'old' says old as in hold". Reveal the -ing and explain -i-n-g says ing. Then read holding. Cover over -ing in morning and have them sound out morn. If they struggle with morn, just tell the, "'or' says or as in corn". Reveal the -ing. Have them read morning.

                    As an alternative for the word leaned I would ask, " What sound does the first letter make? (L) what sound does ea make? (Long e sound) Put those together... (Lea) Now add that next letter. (Lean) " I would tell the student the -ed at the end of the word sounds like the letter d. So let's blend lean with that d sound.

                    Next I would have the students watch and repeat after me as I pointed to and read each word. Then I would have them go back and read all the words aloud again.

                    Then we would read the story.

                    Sometimes it helps to have the list up and ask first if they already know any of the words on the board. If they do you can skip the word study. Then as you look at your list of words, group words with similarities together as I did above. This week had a lot of words so the word study may take twenty minutes. Most lessons should go much quicker. Remember there is no written work here just getting the child to really look at the words.

                    I hope this is helpful.

                    Blessings,
                    Michelle T

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Phonics from A to Z is an excellent resource!

                      Michelle T

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Michelle,
                        As usual, when I read your post I wished I could have my little ones sitting in your first grade class...you must do such a great job with them! My first one to use STT & MSTT is going to be next year, so I am filing away your method for future reference. Thanks!

                        AMDG,
                        Sarah
                        2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
                        DD, 19, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
                        DS, 16
                        DD, 14
                        DD, 12
                        DD, 10
                        DD, 8
                        DD, 6
                        +DS+
                        DS, 2

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Thank you so much, Sarah! But, my classroom is actually kindergarten!

                          Blessings,
                          Michelle T

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Story Time Treasures - Discovering reading gaps

                            Michelle,

                            Thanks again for outlining what you do for "Caps for Sale" as part of Story Time Treasures (putting words on flash cards, reviewing the phonics, and drilling them). This worked beautifully for "Caps for Sale" and reduced a lot of frustration. Since I just have one student doing STT, I gave her the flash cards and had her put the words into two piles--(1) words she could read and (2) words she could not read. I tested her to ensure the words were in the proper piles. Then we just went over the "could not read" pile and posted them above her desk for reference while she read.

                            We didn't really need this process as much for "Blueberries for Sal" which went smoothly. Now we are onto "Make Way for Ducklings" and I feel like I am feeding her a lot of common words and helping her too often with others. I just did not know she didn't know words like "our" and "only." I didn't know she would get stuck on words like "build" and "wing." She did all of First Start Reading and Primary Phonics sets up to 5 and 6. But I am still seeing gaps in her knowledge of common words and phonics rules such as the "y" at the end of words.

                            I'm not sure what to do because I don't see the gaps until she starts reading the pages for that day. As I said, the other books went smoother.

                            Can you and others offer help?

                            Also can you prep me for Billy and Blaze? I really would like that book to go better than "Make Way for Ducklings."

                            Thanks very much!

                            Comment


                              #15
                              thenightbeforechristmas,

                              It may take a day or so to get that to you. But I am working on it!

                              Blessings,

                              Michelle T

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X