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    daughter slowly learning to read

    Hi all,
    We have a daughter who will be 7 in June who is slowly learning to read...very slowly. I know I am not supposed to compare, but her older brother and sister quickly learned to read and early. I take no credit for it...they just sort of picked it up and have this love of reading. I think our youngest has a want to read, as well. However, she would much rather play with her ponies and make up stories to share (which I love and one of the things I adore about her). I don't want to trade those stories for her reading...I suppose I fear her falling behind.
    MP is tough and I like that. I love having expectations above and beyond what they think they can do being set for them. However, I do worry about our youngest. We are still working on phonics and have not started on the 1st grade lit program for her. I guess my question is, do we start that and do what we can or do I hold off and start that with her next year (assuming she is ready for that?) Just need some direction.
    My husband trusts my judgment...just not sure I do!
    Thanks for any help you all can offer,
    Suzanne

    #2
    Greetings!

    First I will just remind you that every child is different and reaches those reading readiness indicators at different times, just like loosing teeth! I bet your daughter's stories are very imaginative. (I have a daughter known in he family for her stories.) Like you, I wouldn't want to squelch that creative imagination in her.

    Secondly I have a few questions. Has your daughter been through the First Start Reading program? If not, which phonic based program has she completed? A strong phonic based program will be imperative.


    Looking forward to your reply,
    Michelle T

    Comment


      #3
      Suzanne,
      Your youngest sounds a lot like my third child, who is incredibly bright, but had zero interest in school-related work until much later than her siblings. She remembers things like no one else, and also has an incredible imagination, but her ability to put aside her own plans for the day to do her work is still really difficult, even at nine! So she was the latest to start school in our family, and still struggles with things the others have not found difficult....like handwriting. But then when it comes to composing her own sentences, she is leap years ahead of where her siblings were at her age.

      So I agree with Michelle, that you have to be thankful for the uniqueness of each child, and continue to help them make progress...even if is at a different rate than your other children. She will most likely have a completely different set of strengths and weaknesses from your other children, which keeps you on your toes!

      In addition to Michelle's question about phonics, what grade/core is she in? You mentioned you have first grade literature....is she in first then? It is not too late to start even now. You might be surprised how much progress she makes before next fall (if that is when you start school). Also, remember that you can begin the literature guides slowly, adapting them to what she can do right now, and slowly increasing your expectations as she gets used to them or is able to do more.

      If she really needs more time with just phonics, but her other areas of school are going well, you could always have her start first grade lit in the fall, and have that be a bit behind her other subjects. If she ends up gaining ground in a year or two, you could do a combination year to try to bring her back up to grade level down the road. Remember...homeschooling gives you that flexibility!

      AMDG,
      Sarah
      2020-2021
      16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
      DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
      DS, 17
      DD, 15
      DD, 13
      DD, 11
      DD, 9
      DD, 7
      +DS+
      DS, 2

      Comment


        #4
        Hi ladies,

        Thank you for your encouraging words.

        Honestly, we've tried a few different phonics programs...all with the hopes that she would grasp onto one of them and run off with it!
        We did started with Hooked on Phonics early on...just as I did with our older kiddos. I took a break from it because she wasn't all that interested in it. I did the same thing with our middle child hoping for the same results, that when we returned to it, she would take off as her sister did. (Again, I know that I am not to compare and I don't know a days. And you are absolutely right, she has strengths in areas that her brother and sister do not.)

        We did part of First Start last year, but she seemed so overwhelmed with it. I tend to be pushy with my kids where and when I should probably let off a bit and I definitely didn't want to push any harder with her. I thought we'd come back to it at the start of it last fall when she started 1st grade. I had heard good things about another phonics program so we started that. She is doing alright with it, as long as I don't push for too much. She does alright in other areas of school. She is in Rod & Staff grade 1 math and seems to be doing ok there. Her Bible work she is engaged and enjoys doing that most of the time. She doesn't mind her handwriting.
        Mostly, I think it is as you said Sarah, she just does not want to put aside her imaginative play long enough to do 15 minutes of phonics or reading. She loves being read to and she will invite you in to her "Pet Store" that she just opened so that you can come buy a new pet and and a new outfit for it...she'll tell you all about her 700 ponies and their names and who is friends and who isn't...who likes to play with who and which ponies like to get dirty and which ones like to stay clean.
        I know that one day she will learn to read and all my worry will be for naught.
        I suppose I just worry that MP is not the right fit for her regardless of how badly her father and I would like it to be.

        Again, thank you for all of your encouragement.
        I sincerely appreciate it.
        Suzanne

        Comment


          #5
          Suzanne,
          I have been thinking about your post, and something that sticks out to me as I reread your response was that you have bounced around a bit from program to program, trying a bit, and then trying something else. I admit, I have tried a lot of different programs myself over the years, but normally one per child. Some worked better than others, some faster or slower than others, but at the end of the day, they all worked in that the end result was a child who knew how to read, kwim?

          Something that mght help a bit is to simply take a program that you have....You mentioned that you have First Start Reading, which I am currently using also, so let's go with it, especially if you would like MP to be your long-term choice. Let's look at it. It is a complete program, phonics based, that covers reading and writing together, all planned, laid out well in the teacher's manual....basically, it offers just about all you could expect to need, right? (Aside from some practice readers along the way) So commit to using it all the way through. Make it your commitment, not your daughter's commitment. If it has what you need to help her learn to read, then it should be your choice, right?

          Like I said, I have a daughter who sounds a lot like yours....getting them to sit down and work is where your real effort needs to come in. Making a commitment to a single program removes one obstacle for you. My daughter works on a complete motivation level. If there is something in it for her, she will make up her mind to do it. Since First Start has four books, maybe you work out a reward for completing each book (A, B, C, D) and then a big reward at the end. Set up a chart with squares that have the lesson numbers for the book you are working on. Each time she completes a lesson, cross it off or put a horse sticker on it to show her progress. Learning to read can seem like a lot of work for something they do not even know they want to do. Help her see that she wants to do each lesson because of some other goal, and eventually, she will need less and less tangible rewards because reading is its own reward. You just have to get her there.

          Hths!
          AMDG,
          Sarah
          2020-2021
          16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
          DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
          DS, 17
          DD, 15
          DD, 13
          DD, 11
          DD, 9
          DD, 7
          +DS+
          DS, 2

          Comment

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