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Terms for FFL Recitation

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    Terms for FFL Recitation

    I've been wondering why I am struggling with the format of Recitation for FFL and I think I may have figured out what is confusing me! In Lesson XI, for example, it lists the following for recitation: personal endings; tense endings (5 tenses); amo (six tenses, p.p.); do, sot, judo, lavo (p.p.); and sum (three tenses). Can anyone explain why personal endings are called personal endings and not present tense endings? Isn't that what they are, present tense endings?

    Thank you!

    #2
    They are called personal endings because they are not just used in the present tense. For example, when you form the imperfect, you do so by taking the stem, adding "ba", and then adding the "personal endings". So technically the personal endings would be "o/m, s, t, mus, tis, nt," the present endings would be "o, s, t, mus, tis, nt."

    Does that make sense?

    Paul
    Paul Schaeffer
    --
    Academy Director
    Memoria Press Online Academy

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      #3
      Originally posted by pschaeffer View Post
      They are called personal endings because they are not just used in the present tense. For example, when you form the imperfect, you do so by taking the stem, adding "ba", and then adding the "personal endings". So technically the personal endings would be "o/m, s, t, mus, tis, nt," the present endings would be "o, s, t, mus, tis, nt."

      Does that make sense?

      Paul
      Paul,
      Thanks for your response. I think I understand what you're saying, but I'm still a bit unclear on a few things. (I haven't studied Latin before and perhaps my study of Spanish and French are muddying the waters, so I apologize if my questions are unclear.)

      So the present tense endings just happen to be the same as the personal endings (except for the difference between o/m)? Is that correct?

      Okay, so in the document "First Form Latin Oral Recitation at Highlands Latin School" o, s, t, mud, tis, nt are called personal endings. This seems to be the opposite of what you said.

      I guess I'm wondering what the purpose is for reciting the personal endings, but not present tense endings. To me it seems like it would make more sense, or be more complete, to recite all the different tense endings.

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        #4
        Yes, the only difference between the present tense endings and the personal endings is the o/m. For simplicity's sake, sometimes teachers do not point out the difference and instead teach the "m" in the imperfect and future perfect as an exception. I assumed that you were only at a point in FF where you had learned five tenses. I just checked and realized that you have learned the six tenses so we do equate the personal endings and present tense endings in the recitation. As a teacher I like to differentiate the two in order to reinforce in the students' minds that those personal endings are building blocks and also include the person and number in them (instead of needing an extra pronoun like English).

        Essentially you're reciting the same thing.

        Sorry for the confusion,
        Paul
        Paul Schaeffer
        --
        Academy Director
        Memoria Press Online Academy

        Comment

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