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Intro and a few questions

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    Intro and a few questions

    Hello Everyone,
    My name is Jenni and I have 5 children. My two oldest attend high school at a local public high school and I will be homeschooling my three younger children. They are 12 (7th), 9 (4th), and 6 (1st). I am just beginning to research classical curriculum and Latin instruction. Before stumbling upon this site, I purchased different curriculum (traditional) for each child. I've already opened the packages and can't return them , but I would like to incorporate Latin and any other items that I can from your site that will make it easy for me to transition them to full packages next year. Any suggestions are welcome.
    Thanks in advance,
    Jenni

    #2
    Jennifer,
    Hello, and welcome! Glad to hear you have found MP, and the forum too! Adding Latin into your curriculum would be a wonderful way to begin a transition to the full program.

    Your first grader would not need the exposure this year, as Second grade begins with Prima Latina, so that will be a great starting point. Your fourth grader should do Latina Christiana I. It is still an introductory text, so it will be a gentle introduction with a good amount of vocabulary and enough grammar to get him/her started. After that, you would go into First Form.

    Your older student would have two ways to go...you could start on First Form, and complete through Fourth Form by tenth grade....leaving two years for Latin translation work, which is an excellent way to go, especially since you are adding this work on top of a full curriculum. Also, First Form has great dvds, and lots of practice work to help with mastery.

    The other option is to begin Henle First Year with the MP guide for Units I - III. You would still take three years to get through the First Year book, but some older students enjoy having the analytical challenge of early translating more so than just focusing on grammar. There is also an online class which could help you with that.

    Also, keep in mind that by doing Latin, you will be learning grammar, and can thereby ease up on the grammar portion of your other curriculum to offset some time.

    In addition, taking some of the books the kids will have missed studying in depth, like D'Aulaires Greek Myths, and Famous Men of Rome, and reading them aloud to the whole group will be a great early exposure to the names and events of classical history.

    Lastly, if you have a current seventh grader who will not be doing MP this year, my suggestion for when you come in is to still have that older student do the seventh grade classical/Christian studies portion. It is the in-depth Greek year, where students read the Iliad and the Odessey, and will be an important course to not skip. It will be better preparation for reading the Aeneid, which comes in the eighth grade curriculum. The courses are very challenging, with some folks even using them in high school, so they will be worth it.

    I hope that helps a bit, and if not, feel free to ask away; there are great families here who all help share experience!

    AMDG,
    Sarah
    2020-2021
    16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
    DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
    DS, 17
    DD, 15
    DD, 13
    DD, 11
    DD, 9
    DD, 7
    +DS+
    DS, 2

    Comment


      #3
      Reply

      Originally posted by KF2000 View Post
      Jennifer,
      Hello, and welcome! Glad to hear you have found MP, and the forum too! Adding Latin into your curriculum would be a wonderful way to begin a transition to the full program.

      Your first grader would not need the exposure this year, as Second grade begins with Prima Latina, so that will be a great starting point. Your fourth grader should do Latina Christiana I. It is still an introductory text, so it will be a gentle introduction with a good amount of vocabulary and enough grammar to get him/her started. After that, you would go into First Form.

      Your older student would have two ways to go...you could start on First Form, and complete through Fourth Form by tenth grade....leaving two years for Latin translation work, which is an excellent way to go, especially since you are adding this work on top of a full curriculum. Also, First Form has great dvds, and lots of practice work to help with mastery.

      The other option is to begin Henle First Year with the MP guide for Units I - III. You would still take three years to get through the First Year book, but some older students enjoy having the analytical challenge of early translating more so than just focusing on grammar. There is also an online class which could help you with that.

      Also, keep in mind that by doing Latin, you will be learning grammar, and can thereby ease up on the grammar portion of your other curriculum to offset some time.

      In addition, taking some of the books the kids will have missed studying in depth, like D'Aulaires Greek Myths, and Famous Men of Rome, and reading them aloud to the whole group will be a great early exposure to the names and events of classical history.

      Lastly, if you have a current seventh grader who will not be doing MP this year, my suggestion for when you come in is to still have that older student do the seventh grade classical/Christian studies portion. It is the in-depth Greek year, where students read the Iliad and the Odyssey, and will be an important course to not skip. It will be better preparation for reading the Aeneid, which comes in the eighth grade curriculum. The courses are very challenging, with some folks even using them in high school, so they will be worth it.

      I hope that helps a bit, and if not, feel free to ask away; there are great families here who all help share experience!

      AMDG,
      Sarah
      Sarah,
      Thank you for the valuable information. The idea for reading the books missed as read alouds is something that I will definitely incorporate. Also, thank you for mentioning that Latin incorporates grammar too. That eases my load quite a bit in adding to the other curriculum.
      I may look at tweaking my seventh graders curriculum a bit and lean more towards incorporating more Memoria Press. You see, she loves studying Greek Mythology. They briefly touched on it in 6th grade (public school) and she is fascinated with learning about it. I definitely want her to experience going through that Classical/ Christian Studies portion, even if I have to shelve some of the other curriculum or just use it for reference. Sadly, the curriculum that we purchased does not have any "living" books...it's just text books, so I'm willing to make adjustments in order to incorporate more of the classics.

      I do have one more question. Do you think that adding the literature packages for my first and fourth graders will be too much? We have the A Beka readers that came with the curriculum, but we did not get any other forms of literature.
      Thanks again,
      Jenni

      Comment


        #4
        Jenni,

        Sounds like you have a good handle on things so far! As for literature, since Classical education is so focused on language, you will see the literature guides as being really valuable. The students work on vocabulary, coming up with their own explanations for their words (even if it is just a synonym), forming their thoughts into sentences, reading closely, and discussing what they have read. Even in the older grades students are also expected to be reading aloud to you from their books to practice oral speaking, which also helps retention. Finally, taking the time to go slowly through these great stories really helps them absorb the stories in a way that flying through them does not, which brings to life the transformative power of literature.

        So, yes, I think adding them in would be extremely valuable!!!

        Perhaps start with one of the fourth grade sets, and see how much it adds to your day. You can shoot for completing whatever is reasonable with your other work. As for the first grader, there are two main books....Storytime Treasures and More Storytime Treasures. Maybe start out with one, and see how long it takes you. You could always finish up over the summer, and be in terrific shape for second.

        Happy planning!
        AMDG,
        Sarah
        2020-2021
        16th Year HSing; 10th Year with MP
        DD, 19, Homeschool grad; college sophomore
        DS, 17
        DD, 15
        DD, 13
        DD, 11
        DD, 9
        DD, 7
        +DS+
        DS, 2

        Comment

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