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I am really struggling with placement (Kindy/1st)

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  • Maggie
    replied
    Love the idea of the photo frame! I'm excited to use the K enrichment this fall . As soon as I see the updates are complete I can finally pull the trigger.

    Blessings,
    Amy

    Leave a comment:


  • SaintJude7
    replied
    kindergarten art cards

    The art cards became available right as child number five was finishing up kindergarten. I bought the set anyway to keep for the next child. Prior to that I went online and pulled the images into a powerpoint presentation. I like the convenience of the art cards, although there were several that I took out. (At the Moulin Rouge, The Sleeping Gypsy, The Roofs of Barcelona in the Moonlight, The Harvest Wagon, The Peaceable Kingdom, and Driftwood) I guess these were chosen because an adult liked them, but they don't appeal to my children at all. The woman on the right side of At the Moulin Rouge looks like the stuff of nightmares. I'll substitute some Mary Cassatt and Van Gogh in their place, and our library has a great selection of books on art that appeals to children. We also used the weekly art selections from Classical Writing Primer for my children to try to copy. This was a big hit, especially with my special needs son. I have a big cookbook holder that we use to put the picture of the week on display when it is in a book. It's a good option, if you can't fit the art cards in your budget.
    Blessings,
    Jude

    dd 17
    ds 14 (special needs)
    ds 11
    ds 9
    dd 7
    ds 4
    dd 2

    Leave a comment:


  • pickandgrin
    replied
    Art Cards are both beautiful and affordable! I definitely recommend them. We pretty much have a perpetual K-2 student with our age spans and I love having the art and music for the week floating through on someone's lesson plan each week. We put the card of the week in a photo frame on the mantle once we've examined it. The rest go into a pile for shuffling and recitation. This year I'm buying a duplicate set so my kiddo can put up her favorites on her bedroom wall.

    Leave a comment:


  • CherryBlossomMJ
    replied
    I use the Enrichment Guide for it all, but especially the literature (author profile), poetry, and art information. St this point the EGs might be my favorite material item.

    Hey mama's ... for those of you that said there are aspects you think your kiddo is not ready for the 1st grade material, what specifically did you have in mind?

    Leave a comment:


  • kagmypts
    replied
    Originally posted by SaintJude7 View Post
    Week 5: Letters Tf and Ff (having previously covered M, A, S, N, and R in weeks 1-4)
    Week 6 teaches H and possessives ('s)
    Week 7 teaches C and P and begins using the "Fun in the Sun" reader. (This was the only reader I purchased, because by the middle of kindergarten my daughter was reading everything she could get her hands on.)
    Bear in mind that while they are learning these letters and sounds they are also doing a good bit of writing, so the spacing works out well.
    I would start out by ordering the lesson plans and FSR. The kindergarten enrichment guide wasn't available for my last kindergartener. This worked out well, because I tweaked the literature and poetry portion using some LCC recommended literature and more classical poetry. (Yes, I realize taste in children's literature is very subjective.) And I don't plan to purchase the Copybook again, because I change the verses to the Douay-Rheims translation.
    I see the lesson plans as my starting point, and I pencil in my changes.
    Blessings,
    Jude

    dd 17
    ds 14 (special needs)
    ds 11
    ds 9
    dd 7
    ds 4
    dd 2
    Thank you! Did you use the Kindergarten Art Cards with your last Kindergartner? I thought that the artist and author backgrounds contained in the Enrichment Guide would be a nice addition.

    For those who have used the Enrichment Guide, for what did you use it?

    Leave a comment:


  • SaintJude7
    replied
    subsequent weeks

    Week 5: Letters Tf and Ff (having previously covered M, A, S, N, and R in weeks 1-4)
    Week 6 teaches H and possessives ('s)
    Week 7 teaches C and P and begins using the "Fun in the Sun" reader. (This was the only reader I purchased, because by the middle of kindergarten my daughter was reading everything she could get her hands on.)
    Bear in mind that while they are learning these letters and sounds they are also doing a good bit of writing, so the spacing works out well.
    I would start out by ordering the lesson plans and FSR. The kindergarten enrichment guide wasn't available for my last kindergartener. This worked out well, because I tweaked the literature and poetry portion using some LCC recommended literature and more classical poetry. (Yes, I realize taste in children's literature is very subjective.) And I don't plan to purchase the Copybook again, because I change the verses to the Douay-Rheims translation.
    I see the lesson plans as my starting point, and I pencil in my changes.
    Blessings,
    Jude

    dd 17
    ds 14 (special needs)
    ds 11
    ds 9
    dd 7
    ds 4
    dd 2

    Leave a comment:


  • kagmypts
    replied
    I have one additional question. Is only one letter covered per week?

    Leave a comment:


  • kagmypts
    replied
    Thank you so much for the replies. Just out of our curiosity, in which week do the students begin the readers, and which (set of) reader(s) is used first? I think that I am going to order the Kindergarten lesson plans, the enrichment guide, and FSR this weekend. Having the lesson plans in hand will really help me see how the entire program fits and works together. I am so excited to get started!

    ETA - For the record I am definitely not considering MP first grade for my son to use right now. I know that he is not ready for that, and I don't think that this his reading or writing skills are currently at a first grade level. Before dropping several hundred dollars on a nearly complete Kindergarten core, I just want to make sure that there is enough new material to justify the cost.
    Last edited by kagmypts; 06-20-2014, 02:36 PM.

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  • Enigma
    replied
    I would do Kinder and move quickly through material he knows. I used K with G and D even though they were already reading CVC words. The review was a benefit for them, and the extra practice was a confidence booster! There was enough in K to challenge them that they were never bored. I would not skip any lessons, however, even if your ds has had them before. Every program is slightly {or greatly} different in scope and sequence.

    Like KF, my dd is already reading Little Bear very slowly but she will do Kinder anyway because her other skills are not ready for MP 1. I like to think MP is a grade ahead. So K = 1st, 1st = 2nd, etc.. Do not feel the need to rush. MP provides plenty of challenging material at every age to meet a wide range of development.

    Enjoy!
    Last edited by Enigma; 06-20-2014, 01:29 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • KF2000
    replied
    Hello, and welcome! I hope we can all help in your decision process. One thing to keep in mind is that at these young ages, I don't think you can review too much. That is actually the purpose of focusing on reading, writing, and math and leaving the other portions of the curriculum for later. You really want a lot of time to review and practice everything.

    Also, very often either reading skills, or writing skills, or math skills will outpace the others. This is another reason to not feel the need to move ahead too far too soon...so that you give your child time to have all his skills advance together. For instance, I have an almost five year old who is really reading well now, but she needs longer to gain writing skills. Plus, she needs reinforcement of sounding out words that are unfamiliar. So we will still do Kindergarten, even though she is reading the first grade books already.

    So, to answer your specific questions. First Start Reading is the main component of phonics instruction. It provides all the steps for learning to read AND learning to write....this is the course where you could move more quickly if the early part seems easy, and then take your time on things that are new. The Classical Phonics books is the reference tool that helps reinforce phonics lessons by providing reading lists of similar phonetic based words for practice. The SRA Phonics workbooks are additional practice for what is being learned in FSR.

    As for handwriting, as I mentioned First Start Reading includes training in proper handwriting along with reading instruction, which is such a great way of helping both these skills advance together. So even if the reading is coming easily, you don't want to "just skip" lessons, because the writing is there too and needs time to develop. The Copybook series provides practice in proper penmanship, but also serves as early memory work as children learn Scripture quotations and commit them to memory. The Composition and Sketchbook allows them to copy their memory passages, or a retelling of the Bible story for the week, or from one of their other books, and gives space for their own drawings.

    Hopefully you can begin to see that all the pieces of the program really fit together nicely to help address all the skills students need at this age: reading, writing, memory, story comprehension, etc. MP keeps things very thorough, but efficient...no overlap! So each component is really worthwhile.

    I think the advice you have been given to start in K sounds great, and keep in mind, you can review the materials, and if you need to make adjustments, just call the office and they can help.

    AMDG,
    Sarah

    Leave a comment:


  • pschaeffer
    replied
    Hello.

    I agree with Jude. You can start with kindergarten, but move through at an accelerated pace as your student is ready to progress. That way, you don't miss anything, and your continuity through the curriculum will be smooth.

    Regards,

    Tanya

    Leave a comment:


  • SaintJude7
    replied
    phonics

    "Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons" is a phonics-based program.
    Phonics: a method of teaching people to read by correlating sounds with letters or groups of letters in an alphabetic writing system.
    The Composition and Sketchbook has a blank page for a picture and a facing page that is lined for writing.
    If you would like to use MP, I would order the Kindergarten package, look over each week's lessons, and figure out where in the year to place him. It is important to keep in mind the level of writing that is expected. Review and mastery certainly won't hurt him.
    Blessings,
    Jude

    dd 17
    ds 14 (special needs)
    ds 11
    ds 9
    dd 7
    ds 4
    dd 2

    Leave a comment:


  • kagmypts
    started a topic I am really struggling with placement (Kindy/1st)

    I am really struggling with placement (Kindy/1st)

    My son will turn 6 next month, and I am really struggling with his placement. While my son, who has some major speech delays/problems, is definitely not ready for the first grade package, I am worried about how well he fits into the Kindergarten package. For reference, I am looking at the Kindergarten Complete Curriculum Package (minus math, optional phonics, and Christian Studies). I am currently using Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons while I sort out our plans for next year. My son knows all of the letters, their respective sounds, and how to read CVC words. He can also sound out words with long vowels, but I have to tell him that the vowel is long. He is by no means a fluent reader, but I expect that in the next few weeks that he will be reading basic CVC readers fairly well.

    With respect to handwriting, he does fairly well for his age. Having said that, we are working on proper pencil grip and letter formation. His handwriting skills are more along the line of a Kindergartner who has already completed half of the year.

    Aside from letter sounds, my son has not received any formal phonics instruction.

    Having said all of that, where is his proper placement? Would the first several weeks of the Kindergarten be review for him? Are there any books in the Kindergarten program that we could skip?

    For my own knowledge, what is the Composition and Sketchbook? Is it a blank page at the top for drawing and lined paper at the bottom? I cannot find a sample online. On a related note, how do First Start Reading, Classical Phonics, and SRA Phonics 1 differ? Is there a lot of overlap in content and/or material? I have a similar question with respect to handwriting. How do the handwriting objectives in Copybook I, Composition & Sketchbook, and FSR differ?

    Thank you so much!
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