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    Is Learning Fun?

    Appreciated the article by Ms. Lowe with the title Is Learning Fun? in the Summer 2013 edition of the MP catalog.

    I would love to hear your thoughts about it and your experience with MP curricula.

    We are about to call and order the 6th grade package which is very different from the literature based material we have been using. Kindergarten is going well and I love the enrichment and art cards but do not see either are included in the 6th grade package.

    #2
    I'll let others give you their experience about "fun" and the MP curriculum, but I will confirm that there are no art cards or enrichment guide for 6th grade.

    The enrichment guides are designed to be the social studies and science portion of the primary curriculum. Since we have actual courses for that material in 6th grade, we do not plan on having an enrichment guide. As for the art cards, in the distant future we plan to develop a full art curriculum for the grammar school using the same 100 pieces of art that the students have been introduced to in K-2, but that will not be done for a few years.

    Paul
    Paul Schaeffer
    --
    Academy Director
    Memoria Press Online Academy

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      #3
      Oh to have a bit 'o fun!

      Welcome to MP!

      We are very slowly working our way through MP's 6th grade curriculum guide. For years I have been reading of the different teaching methods and trying to understand Classical Education. I've received some good counsel over the years and a litany of poor counsel. Most veteran homeschoolers that I have known scoff at a 'Classical Education' because of the 'rote memory'. Yet, Classical Education beckoned me year after year. After trying two other classical curricula we decided to try MP, though it was a very gradual implementation.

      My younger two (Kinder & 1st grade) have done very well with MP. And they LOVE the drill work. I can't say for certain why they love it, but I have a sneaking suspicion that is has something to do with mastering material their elder brother (by 5 & 7 years) is working on. Big brother, however, doesn't seem so thrilled with the competition.

      The 6th grade guide has been a struggle for us. But a huge part of that struggle is my expecting him to work on his own when he really needed me to be working with him. For instance, I read part of Trojan War (independently), went over the the study guide with him a bit and expected him to give concise answers. I never read with him, unless he couldn't answer a question. I just wasn't working with him enough. It was an easy read for him; but his last two years have not been very challenging academically and he really needed some more guidance initially. When we finally made it through Trojan War, I checked the forum and read through the Anne of Green Gables teacher's guide. I also noticed that while reading another more difficult book (Cat of Bubastes by GA Henty) out loud to him, he would sneak the book from the shelf and read it while he was supposed to be working on other stuff - 3 times in one day! So we started Anne with two books. I read aloud from one and he follows along in the other, writing page numbers for the answers in the margins of his workbook. We're continuing it as a read-aloud because I have a couple of others that have fallen right in love with Anne and can't wait to see the movie. I've even caught Big Brother reading ahead a time or two! Woo Hoo!

      And then there's the Composition and Latin-Grammar factor! Thinking of it brings tears to my eyes! I have owned Prima Latina since that dear child was headed into second grade. We never started it because I thought that he needed to have a thorough understanding of English Grammar before learning another language. So we have been Grammar-Jumping for years - all painful! Same thing with Composition. Finally I got my hands on IEW for Composition and started listening to Andrew Pudewa. Then I heard his take on learning Grammar and Latin, so I handed my 12 yo Prima. (MP and IEW are the only curricula providers that I have heard recommend teaching Latin instead of a heavy grammar program). He actually liked it! So we decided to skip that one and jump to LCI. We'll complete that in the next couple of weeks. Last night he was telling me that he'd rather learn a language without declensions and suspensions (or something like that ). It was all I could do to keep from dancing on the table! He corrects my Latin pronunciation usually prays in Latin, and overall is doing well. I could be wrong, but I think he likes it because it is so organized and methodical. At any rate, he understands the material and that is evident to me.

      It has been a year of hard work for us, but also one of great accomplishment! And don't get me wrong, I love to have fun; but as my dear husband once told me, "fun isn't in the Bible."

      Comment


        #4
        I can't help a lot (haven't read the article), but you can look for various Charlotte Mason websites for more art study. Ambleside Online schedules 18 selections a year (2 weeks each), and Simply Charlotte Mason has art portfolios to buy. Or you could use the Kindergarten art cards and perhaps add a biography or search the internet for ideas relating to that artist or piece.

        What will the more in-depth art study from MP look like? Will there be artist biographies or art lessons imitating the picture or ???

        Is the article on MP's website anywhere? I've been cleaning & purging the house and I can't find my MP catalog anywhere.
        ~~~Amy~~~~
        Self-educating focusing on Latin & good books. John 8:32
        Homeschooling: Jonathan (10), David (9), Andrew (7), and Anna (3)

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          #5
          The Summer 2013 catalog is accessible online here: http://www.memoriapress.com/classical-catalog/summer-2013

          As for the in-depth art study, it will probably be more like an art history course that goes through the different art periods and styles.

          Paul
          Paul Schaeffer
          --
          Academy Director
          Memoria Press Online Academy

          Comment


            #6
            fun?

            The article was very enjoyable. The classical method of education matches up very well with how I tend to teach anyway. I joke that I am raising future Jesuits. I am just not a fun and games kind of teacher. But my children do enjoy the mastery of material. In Andrew Campbell's "Living Memory," he cites the proverb "Omnia mea mecum porto," which means, "Everything I own, I carry with me." Then he applies this to how that which we learn in childhood stays within us forever. My job is to see that my children are exposed to those things that inspire virtue.
            Blessings,
            Jude

            dd 16, ds 13, ds 10, ds 8, dd 6, ds 4, dd 14 mos.
            DD24
            DS21
            DS18
            DS16
            DD14
            DS11
            DD9

            Comment


              #7
              We have been using MP for several years now, and I have noticed that the coursework is both interesting & challenging, which produces a lot of groaning, but also a lot of good discussions.

              However, the FUN happens outside of school when the kids notice a Latin phrase and can translate part of it, or when they identify a constellation in the night sky, understand a reference to a Greek myth, notice a bug running across the sidewalk, or can figure out an unfamiliar word. It's like they've gained entry into a secret club!
              Jill, mom to
              ds10 (MP 5th), ds8 (MP 3rd), dd6, ds5

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