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For those of you who homeschool multiple grades with MP

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    For those of you who homeschool multiple grades with MP

    I am trying to work out a daily schedule for next year. I will have a 2nd grader doing MP(which we just switched to) and a 1st grader doing our old curriculum. Along with a 2yo and 1yo running around! This should be fun! !

    I need help deciding what subjects, if any, from the 2nd grade plans can be done independently so that I can use that time for my 1st grader. Even if it is open, give direction and have 15-20 minutes of independent work. I am tempted to let her read the literature selections on her own and then come together for the vocabulary, comprehension questions, etc. She is an advanced reader so I am not concerned with her reading capability.

    Thanks for the input!

    #2
    Multiple children

    I think the best advice I could give is to let go of the idea that you are going to be able to recreate a school environment. We get this picture in our heads that we should be sitting next to the child, methodically working through the lesson plans and then smoothly moving to the next child to do the same. And the reality is that we are handing out bits of instruction while feeding, cleaning, and resolving life-shattering conflicts over whose turn it is to play with toy X. I actually think this may benefit our children in the long run, as they learn to dig a little harder for the answer on their own. A big part of my job as a homeschooling mom is to see that my child is a strong reader by the time they hit first grade, so they can do the work with as little help from me as possible. With writing I can give a little more leeway and ask for oral answers over lunch or afternoon snack. That is also usually when we have time to look at art cards or listen to music or discuss interesting things that we have come across. While I may be able to go over some of the information at the beginning of a lesson, I don't sit next to my child to do it. You cannot homeschool in a large family the way you can with only one or two students, unless you want to go through some serious burnout. The time with your toddlers is going to fly by.
    Now the one exception to this is my special needs son. I do have to be with him for a great deal of what he does, so I keep his lessons short.
    Blessings,
    Jude

    dd 16, ds 13, ds 10, ds 8, dd 6, ds 3, dd 1

    Comment


      #3
      I have to concur with SaintJude7...it is very taxing on your psyche to try too hard to stick to a set "schedule." We tend to use the word "routine", which is a better reflection of how things tend to go.

      That being said, I usually do take time over the summer, as I am going to do soon, to look over what subjects the kids have, which ones I really need them to do with me, and which ones they will be responsible for simply showing me their completed work...which it sounds like is the route you want to take with your second grader.

      If you are doing the full MP second grade, and since your reader is strong, my $.02 would be to block together copywork, the phonics workbook work, reading the lit selections, and then the math workbook together. I would think this would buy you a nice amount of time to do some hard-hitting time with your first grader, especially if the little ones are playing together.
      (just make sure you give any new math instructions first) Then when you return to the second grader, you could look over the work, do the math drill work, and work on the literature guide together.

      That is just one possibility. At this age, things that seem very workbook-y are really great ways to get some work done with another child, so by grouping several of those together into one block, you get a nice block of time with another.

      Also, the first several weeks of school are usually our most difficult, as all the kids are getting used to the routine and the subjects...there are always a ton of interruptions and questions. So expect a hump, but once you get over it, things usually settle down and a routine seems to come about.

      Hope that helps! (we have five grades going at the moment, if you count preK)

      AMDG,
      Sarah
      Last edited by KF2000; 05-15-2013, 07:44 AM. Reason: clarifying
      2019-2020 - 9th Year with MP
      DD, 18, Homeschool grad; Art major/philosophy minor
      DS, 16
      DD, 14
      DD, 12
      DD, 10
      DD, 7.5
      DD, 5.5
      +DS+
      DS, 18 months

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by ksullivan87 View Post
        I am trying to work out a daily schedule for next year. I will have a 2nd grader doing MP(which we just switched to) and a 1st grader doing our old curriculum. Along with a 2yo and 1yo running around! This should be fun! !

        I need help deciding what subjects, if any, from the 2nd grade plans can be done independently so that I can use that time for my 1st grader. Even if it is open, give direction and have 15-20 minutes of independent work. I am tempted to let her read the literature selections on her own and then come together for the vocabulary, comprehension questions, etc. She is an advanced reader so I am not concerned with her reading capability.

        Thanks for the input!
        I'm glad you asked this question because I have the exact same ages and I'm wondering how to do it all!
        Courtney
        Ds10 acc.5th
        Dd8 2nd
        Ds6 K
        Dd4
        Ds2
        Dd1
        #7coming July
        "saved by grace"

        Comment


          #5
          just chiming in...

          I'm thankful for this post too...how to make it all "work" seems to be the biggest challenge to homeschooling in my mind. I will only have a first grader next year (who did wonderfully with MP kindergarten), but following on her heels will be my 3 year old and 21 month old (who will be only 1 school year apart), not to mention twins coming in 2 weeks or less!!! Storing these ideas in the depths of my mind for the future...
          Blair

          Mom to 6 sweet girls and finally a boy!
          SB - 9 - starting MP 5M
          A - 7 - starting MP 3rd
          M - 5 - starting MP 1st
          F & SG - 4 year old identical twinners
          CJ - a rascally, busy 2 year old
          GH - 4/17/2017, much adored, baby brother!

          Comment


            #6
            Welcome to MP! We are just finishing up 2nd grade plans this year. I also have a 12th grader doing another program, a 6th grader doing a mix of some MP and some other, a K'er doing only reading and math and tagging along with the 2nd grader as well as two high schoolers at the local school. As they get older, they do much, much more on their own. Also, if they are strong readers it will make independent work easier. My 9yr old is a struggling reader so she did the 2nd grade plans rather than 3rd grade since that is where her language arts level is (we did different math) and I spent more time with her than others may need.

            One suggestion I wanted to make is to not assume your children all have to be "doing school" at a given time. Perhaps you may find it easier when working with your 1st grader to have the 2nd grader playing with the toddlers so you can focus on the 1st grader. Then switch to work with the 2nd grader while the 1st grader plays. With only two to school right now, you have plenty of time in the day. Then they can do independent work while you get stuff done around the house or play with the toddlers.

            That said, there is much a 2nd grader can do independently. I have the lesson plans here in front of me so let me comment on each "subject" in the plans. Latin- will mostly be done with the teacher, about 15 min a day. Part of the workbook can be done independently which is only two days a week. Phonics/Spelling- phonics book can be independent (1-2 pages a day), but spelling will involve teacher time. copying spelling words (2 days a week) can be done alone. Reading- she can read the passages alone if she is a strong reader (we did it together as my daughter needed my help), but I would strongly suggest doing the workbook together. It is very helpful to have the student answer the questions outloud and form a good sentence, then have the teacher write it out so they can copy it in the book. You can also help her form a good sentence. I find this takes much less time than having them do the book alone and then correcting bad sentences. The main point, beside the actual comprehension, is to learn to write good sentences. Math- did not use so cannot comment. Copybook/memory- the reading and memorizing might be easier done with the teacher, but the actual copywork is independent. Cursive- independent. Literature enrichment (history and science and music and poetry) is done with the teacher. This is a good subject to combine with younger kids- let them listen to you read and discuss with you at their level. It is also considered enrichment so if you do not get to it every week it is ok! My daughter struggled with the language arts enough that we just skipped this section as she was burning out with "school".

            Homeschooling offers so much flexibility so don't be afraid to try something different. If you start the year one way and find it is stressful, try another approach. You will eventually find your groove (and your groove will be different each year as your kids age and you add more kids)
            Debbie- mom of 7, civil engineering grad, married to mechanical engineer
            DD, 25, BFA '17 graphic design and illustration
            DS, 23, BS '18 mechanical engineering
            DS, 21, chemistry major
            DS, 18, Physics major
            DD, 15, dyslexic, 10th grade customizednMP plus co-op
            DS, 12, super squirmy, possible dysgraphia, MP 7A
            DD, 6 , K- finally one who seems to like drawing and writing- first one since my oldest!

            Comment


              #7
              I've found 2nd grade conducive to independent work. 3rd grade is a little harder for me but I think it's because I want to learn right along with him the things that I never learned in school. You're 2nd grader will eventually be able to the copywork, SRA, some math and cursive independently. I wouldn't count on being able to the literature independently though. It is challenging and important to model answers to them.
              Courtney
              Mom to 5 boys-14,13,10,8,5 and the girls- 3 and 1

              Comment


                #8
                Welcome!

                Some great ideas here, and I'd like to concur with Courtney on the Literature. For years I've been letting my eldest run with the reading aspect of his education. He's always been a strong reader and I just assumed that he didn't need much direction because of that. I'm now realizing that there is so much more to literature than just being a strong reader. This year he's been working on the 6th grade set and we have really struggled with Trojan War. It wasn't that it was a difficult read for him, he just didn't like it and therefor didn't want to finish the work. Not long ago however I was reading Henty's The Cat of Bubastes to him and he 'snuck' the book off the shelf to finish it. One of the things that seems to make a difference is how much my reading aloud sets the characters. Once I can establish the characters, he can run with the book. When we started Anne of green Gables, I found him sneaking that one as well and reading ahead!

                For my younger ones (3ys, Kinder & 1st) I have the little ones listen in as the 1st (and/or 6th) grader is reading his Literature selection. Some of the workbook pages I have to walk him through, while others I can answer the questions with him, writing them on a white board for him to copy later.

                Math - Rod and Staff math is very repetitive and review-oriented, making it easier to let my guys work independently on this so I can work with someone else. I try to have an eye over the shoulder though to ensure neatness and that they are understanding what they are to be working on. I really don't need to 'teach' the lesson to them every day though.

                Literature & Enrichment is hit and miss. Sometimes we get to it, sometimes we don't.

                Quiet Time! Love this subject for the preschoolers! I started out putting my baby/toddler in a pack 'n play (in a separate room) with some toys and/or board books. I started with 15-20 minutes and worked up to an hour about mid-morning. Not all of my children have had much appreciation for this one, but I could see the need for it (as younger ones & as the older sibling trying to get through school). Rarely was the time that I would take them out of Quiet Time because they were crying. I did however start telling one how long QT would be and set the timer, so when the timer when off he knew he could put away his QT toys. Quiet Time really serves a multi-fold purpose: 1) It gives the older siblings a chance to think and work through a subject and 2) It keeps the little one from wandering aimlessly and/or thinking someone should always be entertaining him/her. 3) Mama's sanity. 4)Etc. I do frequently implement a 30-60 minute quiet time (usually of reading, but coloring, drawing, puzzles, etc works as well) in the afternoon for everyone.

                Again, welcome and have fun with your sweet little ones!

                Blessings!
                Kami

                Comment


                  #9
                  Thanks so much for the feedback!

                  With having a newborn this last year, we really only focused on the 3 R's during her naps and let everything else be icing on top when we could fit it in. I am looking forward to digging next year and having a more established routine. This was very helpful in getting an idea of what direction to go at the beginning! I know it can be done and it is so encouraging to her that from other homeschooling families with even more little ones than me.

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